I think my daughter has a sensory disorder but don't want her diagnosed because of the stigma that is attached to it. Anyone have any good reads on this issue?

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Renee - posted on 01/21/2009

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I agree with Jill. My son has a Sensory disorder. He was diagnosed in November. It hurts to know that there is something going on that we have no control over, however and regardless to the stigma, she will be so much better off getting help with counseling, and classes on dealing with the disorder. In time you will see a lot of positives instead of negatives. Remember, There is not one mother out there who wants to have a child with a disorder or a disability. Everything will work itself out.

Kelly - posted on 01/21/2009

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Hi. In my pre-baby career I was a child therapist. I totally understand the concern of a stigma. However, if she is diagnosed correctly, early intervention makes a huge difference (as opposed to allowing things to progress). Also, when she reaches school age if she needs it support services will be available to her with a diagnosis... Best wishes to you.

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Tara - posted on 01/25/2009

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Hi Jaymie, I am very new to all of this and learning. I am not sure how old your daughter is but if she is under the age of 3, you could have her evaluated by a occupational therapist and she maybe able to benefit from some services. A great book to read is the Out of Sync Child. I have a 10 year old daughter, who had numerous sensory issues that I noticed before age 3 and we ended up doing a brushing technique with her... I would love to hear more and feel free to contact me... She still has sensory issues, but has also outgrown alot. The feel of her clothes is still a big thing and she pretty much only likes cotton clothing! When she was younger, she was a biter- the oral stimulation thing, she used to hang upside down all the time, she would need to feel and touch everything, hated tags in her clothing, put everything in her mouth. Believe it or not- gum was good for this (but keep in mind) they may also play with it and get it stuck in very unwanted places)- Our rule was- when she started playing with it- it was time to through away... Not sure if any of this is helpful, I would be more then willing to share things that I have done with her along the way. The book is great and helpful! I agree with getting her diagnosed... Don't worry about a stigma- if schools are aware of issues then they can provide services. If you want to keep it private- you can seek evaluations on your own. Talk to your peditrician or call the hospital in your area that provides rehab services and ask if there is a occupational therapist who specializes in Sensory Intergation - if you do it this way it is all on your own and schools do not have to know... The school system that I have worked with- has been a god send and wonderful... It is hard to over come the worries of having your child labeled or feel that there is a stigma attached to them. My daughter was also diagnosed with ADHD, and a Mood Disorder- all are very hard things to overcome, take a lot of work but without the diagnosis, she would not have received the services she needed and she would not be where she is today. She is doing very well, we still need to stay on top of everything but it is something that requires communication between home and school for the best success for her... Like I said, you can still keep it all very private and decide later how you want to handle things, after you have a professional evaluate and provide you with their recommendations. Good luck... and be patient :-) especially if she makes messes because she is exploring the senory world... :-) IE toothpaste all over, baby powder mixed with water... and if she is a child who is looking for a lot of oral stimulation- try the gum, sugar free :-)

[deleted account]

you are your childs stongest advocate, being afraid of the label that will be placed upon her will not make her sensory issues"go away" ,  Getting her the help she needs will help you to understand how to deal with them and teach others. No two children are alike every child has their strengths and weakness, please dont make your child f.eel that her qwerkiness is wrong, Its just who she is and for the sake of her get her the  therapy that she needs  so she can learn how to deal with it

[deleted account]

you are your childs stongest advocate, being afraid of the label that will be placed upon her will not make her sensory issues"go away" ,  Getting her the help she needs will help you to understand how to deal with them and teach others. No two children are alike every child has their strengths and weakness, please dont make your child f.eel that her qwerkiness is wrong, Its just who she is and for the sake of her get her the  therapy that she needs  so she can learn how to deal with it

Shivanna - posted on 01/23/2009

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Hi,

I'm glad that someone asked this question because my 3 yr old was just diagnosed with sensory disorder. I'm not even sure what that is. The doc says that she has an aversion to strange people. I mean I think that is a good thing. I don't want her just going up to strange people. I don't know. She also has delayed speech, and she is in speech therapy now. She started talking just at 2 1/2 on her own, but they said that she still needed it. And now my 1 1/2 yr old son is going through the same issues. I just think that my kids are perfect, and they are kids, and that they will learn in their own time. Am I wrong? I don't want my babies to be labeled as different, cause they're not =/

Cynthia - posted on 01/23/2009

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Hi! I'm new here but I wanted to let you know that the stigma of being labeled "weird" and "unsociable" was much worse for my daughter than the one she was diagnosed with. She has Aspergers and ADHD, and once the teachers understood that, her life improved! Especially with the help we were able to get once she was diagnosed. Up until then, Teachers and other adults were blaming us for her strange behaviors.

[deleted account]

I'm all for diagnosis. There is so MUCH that occupational therapists can do to help out kids before they actually fall behind at school or suffer stigmas due to their behavior. My son started speech therapy at 18 months and now a bit less than a year later is at level with his peers, which would never have happened without the intervention. Good luck!

Christina - posted on 01/21/2009

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hi, my daughter whos 15 has speech/cognitive disorder.  we had her tested at 4 and i dont regret a moment of it.  first off i can say never ever has she gotton a label from it.  i even had to hold her back in kindergarden and explianed it that only very special kids get to do kindergarden twice and how happy i was that she was one of them.  when she told ppl about dong kindergarden again she would repeat what i told her...and all of hte adults those who knew her and those who didnt complimented her on being such a special girl and then they would say that i did a wonderful job and would i mind if ever it crossed their path if they could pass on my special secret.  the second most important thing that happend is we had an IEP (Illinois Education Plan) set from teh start and every year its adjusted for her.  it helps her to understand things easier and lets the teachers know tht she will need more explaination.  shes been a wonderful student and extreamly organized from the get go, with the help of this IEP.  also she can recieve help all the way thru college and beyond if she wants her maters.  its has been a God send for our family.  talk to your school and go from there.  if you have ANY questions please feel free to contact me, we are our childrens voice and if you get hit with some blocks there are ways around it.  good luck and your doing the best (tho maybe not the easiest thing for mommies) for your daughter.  your a wonderful, in touch mother!!!  thats what its all about

Jill - posted on 01/20/2009

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How old is your daughter? If you think there is an issue, it's best to get her diagnosed so you can help her now and not wait until later. Whatever the disorder is, your daughter is more important than what people think about her diagnosis. Good luck, Jaymie.

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