Testing???

User - posted on 11/17/2008 ( 8 moms have responded )

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If you have already started the diet and it has treated all of the issues. Should you still do the testing? Would it be worth it to take her off the diet (which I can't imagine for a # of reasons) to do the test? Is there some way they can test while on the diet. How do they monitor kids who are already diagnosed? We found this solution when the Drs could and we have an appt Wed to talk about it , does anyone have this type of experience?

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Charlene - posted on 11/19/2008

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my son was the same way, no weight gain and he couldn't talk. He was borderline autistic. We changed his diet and he could make full sentences in 5 days, and behavior changed too!

Shannon - posted on 11/19/2008

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I started my son on a gluten-free diet on my own, and have never had him tested by his pediatrician. #1, I won't take him off the diet for it, and #2 the pediatrician was adamant that diet had nothing to do with his myriad of attention/focus/hyperactive problems - although they all improved drastically immediately upon eliminating gluten. I figure I know my child 1000Xs better than the Dr. does, and therefore do not need their approval or official test. best of luck!

User - posted on 11/19/2008

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We drew the blood today. She is still one very unhappy little girl! The Dr seemed kind of amazed that I came to this conclusion on my own and started the diet but was shocked by the vastly different child he saw. She has gained two pounds since Aug 1!! This after nothing since Jan. So regardless of the outcome of the testing we will be staying gluten free

Charlene - posted on 11/18/2008

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I agree, still do the testing, but don't be surprised if it comes up negative. Young bodies can "heal" the situation pretty quickly. If the diet is working, stay with it even if they tell you that the test was negative. They can still look for other underlying problems while on the diet. And like Gorel says, if they eat something and react to it, it's obviously an issue!

Abbie - posted on 11/17/2008

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I am not a child, but I went on the diet before I was tested and had to go back "on gluten" for 2 weeks to get diagnosed. It might be beneficial to go ahead and do the testing to see what kind of damage has been done and to make sure that is actually the problem and not something else. But, it isn't much fun to go back to eating something that is hurting you either. I think the choice is really yours.

Charlene - posted on 11/17/2008

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I had already switched my 2 1/2 year old to a gluten free diet because he had been crying constantly for 2 1/2 years. The Dr.s could figure out what was wrong and were about to label him autistic. And when I figured it out, I couldn't get an appointment to see the Dr for almost a month! The blood work came up negative, which Dr said it would and he asked me to put him back on the food for 2 months to do a bowel biopsy, and I flat out refused, I wasn't going to listen to my baby cry for one more day! They don't really monitor the kids, there is no real medication to give them, except over the counter diarrhea med, or pain killers, ant acids etc. But the absolute best fix is just to stay on the diet, even though it is expenssive and time consuming.

Görel - posted on 11/17/2008

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In Sweden the usually just do follow-up blood tests. My son had to do a follow-up biopsy after 4 years, because he lacks the IgA antibodies that they use to measure with. If your child ever accidentialy has gotten any gluten products and reacted on it, you should be able to argue that the gluten provocation test is not necessary...

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