Out of control

Andrea - posted on 04/26/2009 ( 17 moms have responded )

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My daughter was diagnosed at the age of 4. She is now 9 and her best A1C has been 7.8, once. I have been trying so hard to get her blood sugar under control, I take a food log to her doc every month and we'll change a few things here and there but can't seem to figure it out. She also craves sweets and it is very hard to get her to eat what she is supposed to. Any ideas or suggestions?

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AR - posted on 11/07/2014

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Andrea

I have had type 1 for 40 years and was diagnosed at the age of 5. I wish I had monitors and an Insulin pump then. Honestly, 7.8 is not BAD. You are going to see shifts throughout her life and not everyone is going to have a 5.3. The recommends now are under 8.0 and trying to be at least a 7.5. If I go under 7, I am hitting 40's all the time and Dr agrees that is not good. Do not be hard on yourself. You posted this in 2009, so she is now 14. That year in itself is a trial, hormones make blood sugars a constant battle. The sugar craving was intense for me these few years and she will probably try and hide things from you. At the time, I was not getting enough Insulin and when Dr realized that, the amount helped a lot for me. I have found Xylitol to be a fabulous alternative. There are candies made from it also. They are a little pricey, but this also works in digestive helps and does not promote tooth decay..actually helps your teeth. Amazon carries a lot. Agave nectar also good and does not raise blood sugars quickly and for me very little.
I will tell you this was the period for me where I was also tired of being Diabetic and ate like I was "normal'. At this time is was all Injections, not pump was available. The pump was made a HUGE difference in how my sugars react and in giving me more food freedoms. Everything does NOT have to be sugarless, but you have to know how your body reacts so you can plan how the pump spreads out the Insulin time. It also is a huge change for illness blood sugar changes/menstration. I have Minimed also and would recommend them for service especially.
The last thing I would say to ALL, is YOU be your child's own best physican. There are great Dr.s out there, but in my experience very few. I have had to research and study and know ME, to advocate for myself medically. If you feel like your Dr. does not understand Diabetes well, or is making changes you do not feel are "okay'. Get a new one. Ask other Diabetics in your area about Doctors and competency. There ARE those who deal with it 24/7 and truly have the knowedge to help you, but you have to do your homework in finding them.
If you have any questions feel free to ask! Hang in there and pat yourself on the back Moms, it is not an easy road and I know my own had a lot to deal . Be thankful though that your children have so many tools to make it easier than years ago and therefore will live longer and healthier lives.

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AR - posted on 11/07/2014

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OH, and having a Doctor tell you to WAIT UNTIL SHE IS DOING BETTER is garbage in my opinion. MANY NEED the pump to have more normal Insulin output and sugars and I was one of them. Shots were NOT doing it, not matter what we did. Changed instantly with pump. Research the data and present to your doctor. You WILL have to push as a parent advocate more than once in her lifetime. If he will not listen. Find a competent Diabetic Endo who will

Wendy - posted on 08/18/2009

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Get her on a insulin pump.My son gets his pump and supplies through metronics. I found it regulates the blood sugars so much better.Eventually they will have to test less on there blood sugars. It has a beeper that tells you when there not getting any deleivery in the pump or when it gets to high. His blood sugars were all ove rthe place til we got the pump. 24 hrs. number on the back of the pump to help you any time or walk you through to reset bolis. Very helpful!



Get sugar free candies and even diabetic shakes- (cheaper at costco) are a good source- all sold at Walmart . They seem to have more diabetic foods and snacks and cold medicines/lotions for the feet for diabetics.



Drinking cold water brings down high blood sugars slowly. Snacking on beef jerky and string cheese. Any protein will maintain blood sugars when they are not hungry.



Just remember when they get to be a teenager they will crave sweets and hide them. Check under the bed and beware of them going to the corner store with friends for candies and cokes. At least that is what my son did and hide them under his bed.

Renee - posted on 05/18/2009

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Quoting Hayley:

Hi, i was looking for some help really, i have an appt with doc this wk for my 8 yr old boy who is constantly stealing chocolate from our cupboards early in the morning b4 we get up, is permanently hungry, has aggressive mood swings. i think that he could be diabetic especially as his nan (my mum) is insulin dependent and i had gestational diabetes in my 3rd pregnancy last year. do you think i could b right? do u recognise any of these symptoms?



Hi Hayley!  My daughter did become quite combative prior to her diagnosis, but the biggest symptoms were EXTREME thirst (waking up in the night crying and begging for a drink) and frequent urination.  If you think something isn't right and you are noticing changes by all means call you doctor.  If it is diabetes the sooner you get on top of it the better!  If it's not (and I hope it isn't) there be something else going on that needs to be looked at.  Good luck!

Tiffany - posted on 05/18/2009

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Quoting Hayley:

Hi, i was looking for some help really, i have an appt with doc this wk for my 8 yr old boy who is constantly stealing chocolate from our cupboards early in the morning b4 we get up, is permanently hungry, has aggressive mood swings. i think that he could be diabetic especially as his nan (my mum) is insulin dependent and i had gestational diabetes in my 3rd pregnancy last year. do you think i could b right? do u recognise any of these symptoms?



I would defenitely get him tested  because it could be early signs and the sooner you know the sooner you can get it under control, good luck

Tiffany - posted on 05/18/2009

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Hi Andrea, I totally agree with the other ladies in saying trying to first find a new doctor and second find out more information about insulin pumps, My son Jonathan was diagnosed at 18 months and we just started him on the pump in November of last year and we have not seem better numbers, He loves the freedom of eating when he wants to instead of schedules and belive me he was defenitely into hiding food, I would find candy wrappers and all sorts of things when I cleaned his room. It's so much better then the shots and I'ts a better desicion for your child in the long run, those high numbers can affect her more then you think now. Good Luck!!

Hails - posted on 05/18/2009

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Hi, i was looking for some help really, i have an appt with doc this wk for my 8 yr old boy who is constantly stealing chocolate from our cupboards early in the morning b4 we get up, is permanently hungry, has aggressive mood swings. i think that he could be diabetic especially as his nan (my mum) is insulin dependent and i had gestational diabetes in my 3rd pregnancy last year. do you think i could b right? do u recognise any of these symptoms?

Katherine - posted on 05/17/2009

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Getting the pump was the best thing we ever did for our daughter. It doesn't hurt to give insulin anymore therefore less sneaking of food. Pump brought A-1C down. High blood sugars does damage to organs (eyes, kidneys.....) This damage can't be undone. But you won't see it right away, it takes a few years for this to show up for the high blood sugars now. Don't wait.

Renee - posted on 05/05/2009

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I understand not wanting to find a new doctor, but if yours isn't willing to look at other options, like pumps, it might be time. If you've been battling with her numbers for 5 years and not finding any solutions a pump should definitely be something you look into. My daughter's numbers were all over the place, but we have a lot more stability now that she's on the pump. They are expensive, but benefits will usually cover it or if you're lucky there might be grant out there to help. I'm in Ontario (Canada) and the provincial government covers them for kids here...that's the only way we could do it. Just remember she's your kid and you have her best interests in mind, push buttons if you need to. Diabetes is not fun even when everything is going ideally, I don't have to tell you how hard and frustrating it is when things are not going well...good luck!

Andrea - posted on 05/04/2009

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well her doctor wants to wait until she is doing good until she gets the pump. Also her doctor got her endocrine degree in the 80's, so she's not up on the most up to date stuff, but I am really scared to change doctors, bc I am so comfortable with the one I have.

Renee - posted on 05/04/2009

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I totaly agree with Taryn! My 8 year old has been on the pump for over a year now, and it's the best thing we could have done for her and us! It allows a lot more flexibility when eating, she doesn't have to wait till the right time if she's hungery she can have a snack. It also makes it a lot easier to correct the highs. For school lunches I write a note every day with the individual card amounts for each item, that way if she doesn't want to eat something the info is all right there for the nurse. Hope you find a solution, I understand the frustration!

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We found a solution that I wished we had tried years ago...we put our 12 year old on the pump. With the bolus wizard he just punches in the carbs he eats...even if he is sneaking...and doses himself...which has made our lives so much easier! He may think he is getting away with sneaking...but the reports from the pump show every bolus and blood sugar...so it does tell on him...but i would rather him sneak and dose then worry about him sneaking and not doing the insulin.

Joyce - posted on 04/28/2009

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with a 14 year old boy. sneaking is a problem. we carb count but when im at work ,he does sneak. i have two other children, i try to keep a reign on food in the house but it is not fair to deprive them. We have been trying to get him on the pen which would allow more freedom in eating, but he wont have anything to do with it. His ac-1 has been high lately. Its very hard. School lunches are usually with in a good range. Sorry, my conversation is all over the place.

Andrea - posted on 04/28/2009

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Quoting Catherine:

Do you do carb counting?.....its supposed to be really effective, i`m gonna be doing the training in a few weeks x



Yes we do carb counting.  Right now she is on a 1:15 ratio, which gets adjusted often.  Probably will be adjusted again soon. 

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Do you do carb counting?.....its supposed to be really effective, i`m gonna be doing the training in a few weeks x

Andrea - posted on 04/27/2009

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Quoting Tamra:

Does she have access to food at school that you don't control? Is she possibly sneaking food? Do you have her help in the preparation? Maybe if she helped pick out the fruit/veggies and helped you fix it she'd be more open to it? I know there are certain veggies my son loves, and we tend to fix them most often, but I try to introduce something new or have something occasionally he doesn't love. He isn't crazy about salad, but if I let him help me fix them, I get fewer grumbles.



The nurses at school do let her make her own choices, however, they don't let her make the wrong ones, lol.  It's funny that sneaking was asked bc last night, I went in her room and her eyes were really big and she looked suspicious, so I got out of her that she had snuck a cookie, and made her give it to me.  She likes stuff like carrots but she also likes ranch with them or broccoli, if it has cheese, etc.

Tamra - posted on 04/27/2009

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Does she have access to food at school that you don't control? Is she possibly sneaking food? Do you have her help in the preparation? Maybe if she helped pick out the fruit/veggies and helped you fix it she'd be more open to it? I know there are certain veggies my son loves, and we tend to fix them most often, but I try to introduce something new or have something occasionally he doesn't love. He isn't crazy about salad, but if I let him help me fix them, I get fewer grumbles.

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