Does your schools recognize dyslexia as a learning disablilty?

Angelia - posted on 03/05/2009 ( 97 moms have responded )

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I live in Kentucky and our state department of education doesnt recognize dyslexia as a learning disabilty. The dyslexia association which has the tutoring program which my daughter is in , has drafted a bill that we are trying to get passed by our state legislature which will require all children to be tested for dyslexia at kindergarden age. I think this would be great because by catching it early our kids will have the help they need from the very beginning. Please let me know what your states are doing to help our kids with dyslexia.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Susan - posted on 01/11/2013

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Hi Everyone,

Just letting everyone one know that I won!!!!!! New York State is paying for my son to go to a private school because they can't educate him. I have learned a lot in the past 4 months it has taken me to get here. If anyone needs any help please let me know and I will do my best. I believe every child deserves the same opportunities as any other child. Good luck everyone!! Thanks for all the support.

Susan

Kristina - posted on 06/27/2011

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States cannot refuse to recognize dyslexia as a "Specific Learning Disability(SLD). Review the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)

(20 U.S.C. 1400) Title I Part A Sec. 602(30)(B)

(30) Specific learning disability.--



(A) In general.--The term `specific learning disability' means a disorder in 1 or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which disorder may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or do mathematical calculations.



(B) Disorders included.--Such term includes such conditions as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia.

(C) Disorders not included.--Such term does not include a learning problem that is primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance, or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage.



Regulations Part 300A General Provisions Sec.300.8(c)(10)



(10) Specific learning disability. (i) General. Specific learning disability means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations, including conditions such as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia.



(ii) Disorders not included. Specific learning disability does not include learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance, or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage.

Antoinette Toni Nella.....I Have Alot Of AKA's - posted on 03/07/2012

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You will not find any school in this so called wonderful country that will help your child overcome his/her Dyslexia. The DOE continues to ignorantly avoid the word "Dyslexia", always trying to use an umbrella term instead and calling it a learning disability. when infact it is merely a learning difference. The DOE will throw out Pilot Programs here and there in some States where parents have formed Organizations to fight for the Rights of their dyslexic children. the truth of the matter is, none of these Programs address the needs of our children because the DOE does not care. The most they will offer is the Wilson program, which if done properly, one to one 5 days a week, will help a little.( DOE won't grant that either) also it won't help a child if he is mainstreamed because they just can't keep up. So here a bright and brilliant child finds himself in special Ed. this is CRIMINAL ! But it is best for the child, only because they will be able to work at a slower pace, yet crush them at the same time because they feel different. Then children begin having behavioral problems or just shut down due to frustration.

Yes we should continue to fight the DOE, but we also must make sure they will have the proper teachers to teach our children to read. BUT they won't, because teachers simply don't recognize, let alone have the training necessary . We all have 2 choices and only 2 choices. Get you child evaluated privately, get the diagnosis , bring it to the school. Now you have to prove that you have tried all the waste of time methods the DOE has offered, which only wastes prescious time. but it's the law. After their methods have failed then you find a school for Dyslexics, get a lawyer and sue the DOE and have them pay the $40.000 to $80,000 a year tuition. ( These schools are not easy to find). Or put your child in Special Ed ( I know it hurts), but everyday your child is suffering and down goes the self-esteem. There was a study done and over 90% of criminals had dyslexia. Starts with frustration, low self esteem, rebelion and then trouble their entire life. Anyway, yes Special Ed. with Wilson at school and then private tutoring by someone with OG training or even Wilson will do. I live in staten island N.Y. and am so greatful that the parents who have been finghting for well over 20 years, and we are still fighting finally one women took charge and opened a tutoring center for dyslexics, with trained OG tutors, the only one in NYC, imagine that. I put my son in special ed, killed me, but he was suffering too much and his self-esteem was crushed and he cried everyday not to go to school. once in special Ed.his self -esteem went up and he had no problem going to school. Then when the tutoring center was opened, I sent him ( yes very costly), he was reading at pre-school level, now, only 10 months later, as promised, he is reading at upper 2nd grade level. Still not able to write at 3rd grade level, but that is improving quickly. First comes reading and then writing.

HE IS THE SMARTEST KID IN HIS CLASS AND HE IS LOVING IT ! Love when he says "oh this is easy. Thank You GOD !

Antoinette Toni Nella.....I Have Alot Of AKA's - posted on 03/04/2011

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Th Wilson program will not help unless it's done one on one with a QUALIFIED teacher. Public school teachers are not qualified. Ask and you will find out that they only took a quick seminar. They aren't even allowed to say they are certified in Wilson because they are not .

Susan - posted on 12/21/2012

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Hi Eddie,

Welcome!! WE are all in this strange boat. You are definitely doing the right thing. I would talk to an Educational Lawyer who specializes in representing children who have learning disabilities. See if they can sue the state of Kentucky so that they pay for the private school. I am doing that right now in New York. There was a legal case in 2007 that went to the supreme court that says that the state has to pay for your child"s education if the district in your area is unable to it. Look into it because it might be worth it. My son is in the process and we have a school district meeting January 2 for placement. We are asking for a private school that teaches to learning disabilities. I have an attorney and a educational specialist that did my son's evaluations and can speak the language necessary to communicate all his issues. Which, sound like your son's issues. If you need help or information let me know. We have to empower each other with information. Don't give up hope.

Susan

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Jzak - posted on 11/11/2015

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I would try and find an Orton Gillingham tutor in ur area and start working with them outside of school. Unless u have the money for a good private school that will help ur child. OG is best started before 2nd grade as it is geared towards young kids. My 4th grader was insulted by it. U have to really consider if your current school is being unhelpful if u have the energy to hire a lawyer or advocate and take on the school. With my daughters multiple issues (anxiety, UTIs, sensory processing) I could not have taken that kind of stress on. Sometimes u can move to an inner city school and get more services than in an affluent public school believe it or not. Each school is different. It is worth asking around to see if there is another public elem school in the area that is worth transferring ur son to that will gladly help him. Going after a school that doesn't freely offer help can be time consuming expensive and exhausting. Suing the state is going to use up valuable time. I would get ur child some tutoring help in the meantime if that is the route u choose To go. Best of luck! My daughter is now in college after I found smaller private schools that would help her with her issues. It was a long difficult road but pulling her out of public school was the best decision we probably made and needed to do it sooner than we did

Linda - posted on 09/22/2015

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Hi Susan, can you pls tell me the process you went through? My son is 5 and still hasn't been diagnosed with dyslexia. The neuropsychologist said that if no progress is made within the first 6 months of Kindergarten, he should get another evaluation done. I evaluated him privately the first time and can't afford to do it all the time. Currently he is enrolled in an ICT class and has an IEP but from what I can tell, this year he won't make a lot of progress, he still adds and subtracts letters and recognizes about 15+ letters only, sometimes he will recognize numbers and sometimes he won't, breaks my heart . He has a twin brother and I can't help but compare the two of them. I dedicate so much time to his learning and he still struggles. I really don't want to waste any time and would love to enroll him to a private school. I would love to know the process and timelines of your experience.

Giannerys - posted on 04/19/2015

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Hey I also live in Nyc and having the same problem with my daughter I can afford private school tuition

Cathy - posted on 04/03/2015

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I am struggling with getting my son services with a WIlson trained therapist in my district in New York. Any help or feedback is greatly appreciated!!

Kelly - posted on 08/08/2014

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This upcoming conference is looking for Dyslexia presenters for online webinar in December 2014: http://www.learningally.org/dyslexiaconf...

Please consider sharing your experiences and developing a presentation for attending parents who have dyslexic school-aged children. If the DOE nationally will not change their terminology and provide the fidelity necessary for "learning differences" to our dyslexic children, we as parents will have to work together in unity to bring about new realities and success for our children.

Amy - posted on 05/29/2014

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HI. I am going through this now did you ever place your son in a different school? Im not sure how to begin. Thank you. Amy

Amy - posted on 05/29/2014

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HI. I am in NY as well my son is in 6th grade with an IEP. I am thinking of switching him to a different school because of his testing with the school his scores go down each year. We have had a neuro psy eval stating he has dyslexia. how did you go about getting a different school and can you tell me the name? Thank you. Amy

User - posted on 05/22/2014

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Noreen,

Even though there are no laws on record for NY state regarding dyslexia, the state still has to abide by the laws on the federal level IDEA. I believe the federal laws trump state. No child can be denied a Free Appropriate Public Education. However, I was interested to know how long it took Susan to get her child into a private school. My son is in 2nd grade and I feel precious time is being wasted. He received the Assistive Technology three weeks ago on a trial basis but nothing has been downloaded. SMH

Angelia,

Your state may not have any laws on record for dyslexia but they have to recognize dyslexia. Dyslexia is listed within IDEA. They might want to address the other issues a child might have and skirt around the dyslexia. Us as parents can not allow that to happen!

Debbie - posted on 04/02/2014

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did you have to wait for him to “fail enough” before they helped him?
syddeb@hotmail.com

Danielle - posted on 02/18/2014

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Hello, my son has sufferd In school for years and recently i went to a IEP meeting and I was told there not trained enough to help my son they are still being trained.So upset because I have known my son suffered from Dyslexia now I dont know where to turn I was told to take him to a sike because he's making facial expressions, easily distracted, ect. I also suffer from dyslexia and never finish school due to not understanding the work feeling stupid

Noreen - posted on 02/02/2014

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Hello Susan,

I live in New York and would like to send my son to a private school for dyslexia and language based learning disabilities to help him. I knew it was difficult to get the local school district to pay for the tuition but did not realize that it could be the responsibility of the state. Any advice and information you could provide would greatly be appreciated. Thanks very much.

Margie - posted on 01/30/2014

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Hi Susan,

I'd love to hear more about your situation. I too live in NY but our district doesn't test for dyslexia and I'm quite sure that my son does have it. Fortunately, hes' been working with a tutor for the last year and has made great progress. She uses the Orton-Gillingham reading program and has changed my son's life. Prior to this, he had been struggling for 2 years and making little progress --even with AIS support in school. I've been pleading with the district to provide alternative reading programs and have been ignored. It's so frustrating.

Thanks, any and all details regarding your experience would be appreciated.

Margie

Cynthia - posted on 01/26/2014

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Hello,
I live in Illinois and there has been movement to try and pass legislation but has been dying out in committee and the pilot program that was run was opposed due to costs.
I am sending this out to let everyone know that there is a bill going foward nationally that everyone needs to contact their USHouse Rep. for and encourage them to vote for the passage of this bill that brings recognition to the need for early intervention for dyslexia and helps to identify it as a language and learning disorder. It is US House "Resolution on "Dyslexia" #456.
More info can be found at http:dyslexia.yale.edu/CassidyUSRepJan2014.html
Here you can find the links as well for reps and signing of lettters.
If we can get 100 reps in House to approve this, then the national efforts will give much more credibitly to the State levels to help encourage more legislation!

Mary - posted on 12/05/2013

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Hi Susan,

I was wondering where in the NY area do you live. My son is dyslexic and I am trying to arm myself with information. The school my son attends does not offer any programs for dyslexia and the goals from the IEP are awful. I was thinking of trying to get him into a private school for dyslexia. I was wondering how you went about that. Your helpful advice would be greatly appreciated. I feel as though precious time is being wasted. Thanks so much.

Susan - posted on 09/25/2013

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TO All,

To all those people in North Carolina who think your state is all so wonderful you will see in ten years from now how far behind your children are from the northern state children. You go ahead and keep voting in people who destroy your state instead of fixing things. The children are who suffer. All your worried about is keeping a few dollars in your pocket. Your penny wise and pound foolish. I guess you will not be producing intelligent kids. Hope you all get what you pay for!!!!

Tammy - posted on 08/29/2013

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My son was diagnosed with dyslexia a couple of years ago, but because it is not recognized as a disability, the school does not provide any services. He struggles a lot with writing and language as well as organizational skills but he is making it. What can I do as his mother to help him overcome this? If you have any ideas, I would love to hear them.

Susan - posted on 03/15/2013

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Hi Angelia,

I wish you the best of luck getting that passed in Kentucky. I really hope it happens. Parents do need to stand up to a system that is broken. The way they teach in the schools dones't work for regular kids either. We moved to NY from NC to just get my son into an appropriate school for his dyslexia. NC is one of the worse states I have ever seen. No help at all for anything. I guess when you pay no taxes you don't get anything. Terrible state for a child with disabilities. Glad we are out of there. It was the best thing we ever did. Good luck Angelia!!

Susan - posted on 01/12/2013

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Hi Bobbi,

Thanks for the good wishes!! I believe that too. I am Dyslexic also and did not know it until last year. I am 48 years old with Two Master degrees. It is a good thing know one told me because I may have never even went to school. My comprehension is still low but other than that I think I have learned how to compensate. Thanks!!! I will always fight for my son as any Mother should!!! Good luck to you as well Bobbi Jean.

Susan

Bobbi Jean - posted on 01/12/2013

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Susan:

I am so excited for you and your son! I forgot to add, never let anyone put limits on your child's ability to achieve. Last semester I finished with my group of high schoolers. (They were dyslexics who were trying to get ready for the S.A.T. Some of them had been told been told not to bother by earlier teachers.) We got the scores back last week. Everybody passed! : )

I'm out of a tutoring job until next year. Couldn't be happier!

Bobbi Jean - posted on 01/12/2013

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Congratulations, Susan. I know you feel great about your son getting the help he deserves. Hang in there.

Bobbi Jean

Susan - posted on 12/21/2012

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Hi Eddie,

Sorry, I had to run out for a little while and get some errands done. Your school may not recognize Dyslexia but they do recognize learning disabilities. Under the law which is Federal there is a disabilities act that all states have to follow. My lawyer was free because financially I qualified for free lawyer assistance. I did hire the Educational Consultant. We just recently removed here from North Carolina and I found him on the internet. He has guided me through this whole process. He has truly been wonderful. My best advice is to find an Educational Specialist or get your son's outside (private) testing. I had an evaluation done at UNCG in North Carolina for Auditory Processing that seemed to help our case. If you are near a big University you might want them to evaluate him. Do research in your area. You need to become an expert so that you know how to advocate for your sons. I will let you know how things go. I will e-mail you.

Susan

Eddie - posted on 12/21/2012

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Hey Susan,
I posted a reply but I guess it didn't go through. Thanks for your reply and info. I am curious to see how your case plays out. You can email me also arizona225yahoo.com if you wish. How long did your battle with the school system go before you took matters to the legal system? What kind of costs are you talking with the help of a lawyer?
Thanks
Eddie

Eddie - posted on 12/21/2012

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Hello Bobbi,
Thanks for the advice. Our school system doesn't recognize dyslexia or a means for help. I have heard there is legislation in our state gov for something. But in the mean time my boys are getting farther and farther behind. This all new to us. Since we just got the diagnosis back yesterday. So for now we are gonna do what we have to do on our own. But this forum is a great place for info and support.
Thanks again for the well wishes.
Eddie

Bobbi Jean - posted on 12/21/2012

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Eddie:

I agree with Susan about seeking the advice of an Educational lawyer. We did this when the school was trying to deny Dyslexia services to both my kids. (Both my husband and I --both dyslexics ourselves--were pressing for Orton style currciulums for them--much like my husband had gotten in school and I got in college.)--The schools my kids went to came up with every excuse in the book.

The attorney gave us all sorts of good advice on record keeping, questions to ask, and helped arrange for the necessary testing. He helped us get access to a neighboring district with a strong dyslexia services program. My son got the help he needed for his reading and my daughter got the help she needed for her math. (She has dysnomia and dyscalculia--forms of number dyslexia.)

Best wishes for complete success.

Eddie - posted on 12/21/2012

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Hello,
I am not a "MOM" but a concerned parent. I ran across this site looking for info on dyslexia. We just had our son who is 8 diagnosed with dyslexia mild/severe. I to live in Ky. I have enjoyed reading all the posts. The similar struggles and stories where like reading a book about my family. We are moving my two boys to a private school after the holidays. We plan on doing outside tutoring for my youngest for dyslexia. The older one who is 10 has ADDHD and an IEP. But he is struggling also. The class has 28 kids in it and we believe the teacher is overwelmed. We couldnt get into a private "dyslexia" school til next fall. So we are moving them to this other school to finish out the year where the ratios are alloooooot less sressful on teacher/student relationships. Our hope with the move is they both gain their confidence back for now. My youngest thinks he is not smart and something is wrong with him. He has a twin sister I'm sure he compares himself to. We have told him you are very smart. You just learn differently. Breaks my heart. After crying and lots of prayer it is time to do like most other families have done and take matters into my own hands. Like allot of others have said DO NOT trust the school. Your childs best interests are not theirs. Your their parent protect them like a mother grizzly bear. Merry Christmas to you all and may our children's futures be filled with successes they deserve.
Eddie

Susan - posted on 12/09/2012

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Hi Everyone,



I am glad to here that there are so many parents that care and will do whatever it takes to help their children. Thirty years ago the parents cared about making a living and raising kids and that was it. There is much more to being a parent than that. I do think the responsibility lies on the parents shoulders. It is clear that the school system does not want to spend any money it doesn't have to so if the parent doesn't complain neither will the school. A Lot of these kids are still being passed through the system anyway. I also have very little faith in the school system. I consider myself a hands on Mom. The kind of Mom the school system does not like because I will fight for my child to get what he needs. They don't like that either. I hear where you are coming from Lynne. Do what you have to do to get it done!!! Good luck to all of us and God bless our kids. With our guidance they might be OK.

[deleted account]

Hi Susan, thank you for all the information.



I have found our solution and it works exceptionally well. As to educated experts, I have concluded that they usually don't know. Sorry on this viewpoint but I think it is a case of the blind leading the blind. There are exceptions!



I am not really interested that my child has "good" grades as it is pretty meaningless, I want him to understand what he learns, questions its truth and spots false from correct information.



When I was 18 I thought NOW I am an adult who knows and at 48 I realise I just have grown up. I understand people, how it works, where to go and who to trust, what's important and not, and most of this could have been prepared in school. I am not talking here about how to get a passport or to fill in a local council tax form...



Our schooling is so eager to promote that its is right in how it teaches, and esp. on what it teaches and "knows" that parents don't know and that "your" kid is the problem. Schools do little on the fine arts of surviving in this jungle of modern society, in fact it mis-educates of how "experts" are synonymous with "caring." I realise that teachers have a major issue with what I say here but they will not come off their high horse and actually look, so why should I be polite. More failed students today than in the past?! It is the future of not just a child but all our future.

Do you know what stupidity is? it is usually considered to mean not quite right in the head,... but it actually has a valuable meaning: not to know and/or alter the actual facts into some fancy own truth. It is not genetic but taught; stupidity is taught, it can not be any other way because you can make someone un-stupid very easily which doesn't happen through gene-therapy but education.





Let me ask you this key question: What is the purpose of schooling? Let us go back to basics and I do not mean basics of spelling. To ahve grades to get a job or to prepare children for adulthood with all the necessary tools. We all know what grades can do and don't do...





Last but not least, why are our educational experts so eager to promote above view, because they have been taught this way and they don't want us to find out that they hiding the ugly truth behind their fancy words and technical jargon, that they don't know and don't care.



Well I said my piece, I shall rest and say no more of this matter. Thank you for your time and replies.

P.S. but I will check out your information about susan barton. I am always willing to learn and willing to be wrong.

Susan - posted on 12/08/2012

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A good source for all kinds of information about dyslexia and how to help is Internationally recognized expert Susan Barton's non profit website www.brightsolutions.com or the international dyslexic association website they also have local associations you can join and support.

Susan - posted on 12/08/2012

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Hi Lynne,



I just read your post and I think as a parent you have to do what works for your child. I was just told by a speech pathologist that Dyslexia is a very broad term and used for a wide range of learning disabilities. I do think that there are different severities of Dyslexia and it depends on what you are dealing with. It is really appalling to me that more research and efforts have not been addressed within the thirty years since I went to school. I hope there is some serious process in the next thirty years.



My son uses the Orton Gillingham method and he does very well using it. He has also been exposed to Wilson which also works very well. I do think it is up to the parents to make sure these children get what they need. You can't depend on the school system because it is clearly broken.

[deleted account]

Okay, you are an expert of 30 years. I can respect your opinion but let me make a point more clear. I suffered with dyslexia all my life and I didn't want to get into it, you have done this but you wrote it, I lived it.



So, from this experience, I will repeat, it is a problem in how we teach and it is that what causes the problem which results in all those labelling "disorders." It is not a child that is stupid but yes the child has concluded, since nobody can help, that he/she must be stupid. (the parents also concluded since the experts can't help, there must be something wrong with their child.)



When 80% of the classmates do alright by that teaching system then why can't I (dyslexic child) do alright; conclusion the problem is me and not the system. The result is ....



So, I don't trivialize, I have found a way to overcome it and discovered that I have skills others don't have. My child, one of them, also has difficulties and by using a different teaching method we have made major inroads and are confident he will be alright.



I fully realise that it isn't your fault personally but my upset with the educational system has been quite intense to put it mildly. Having found a solution myself to my problems just 30 years late, does not negate the fact that the educational institution and "experts" didn't find it and quite frankly didn't care then and don't care now. There is only very few that do care and when I look over the different forums and my conversations with other parents I find this we usually agree on.



In closing, I am pretty sure I will never convince you but I hope some people will simply try and it is clear to me that as a parents, when you see your kid so struggling, you will go and find the answer below, I have given my solution. I am not saying it works with every parent but I cant see that it won't do some good for dyslexic, disorder or "normal."

Susan - posted on 12/08/2012

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Hi, Bobbi Jean,



I really respect your point of view and I wish you were a politician so that you can explain to the dumb people in Washington what needs to be happening. Not to mention half the male population coming up in the next five years with autism and or dyslexia. What are they going to do then? And they can't handle what they got now!!



As a country we are in big trouble now!!!! I myself being a dyslexic and having a dyslexic son I am trying to currently get my son placed into a private school that specializes in learning disabilities. If they say No I will fight them all the way!!!!!! I have lawyers in my family and it won"t cost me anything. These school districts better come up with another plan or else it will cost them a bloody fortune to send every kid to a private school. How dumb are they!!! I am glad that there are people like you Bobbi Jean fighting for these kids.

Bobbi Jean - posted on 12/08/2012

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I apologize in advance for the long post. I could not let this subject be unaddressed.



Lynn: I respectfully disagree with what I think the gist of your post states about dyslexia and (prehaps unintentionally) trivializes a very real, tramatic, and life altering condition. I usually try to be pretty upbeat about most things, but there is notthing upbeat about dyslexia.



In just my thirty years as an educational professional, I have seen adults and children with their self esteen almost nonexistient because of this. I have gotten kids to counseling because of severe depression. Many of my students (including my son at one time) were headed afoul of the law--fighting and whatnot--because of the anger and desperation inside them. This doesn't include the students who thought so little of themselves that they became trapped in drug addiction or were easy prey for child molesters. Our legal system spends hundreds of thousands of dollars to clean up the mess that much less money, applied earlier in the public school system might have avoided.



I have listened to several students calmly tell me of their plans to committ suicide when they got home that night because they were sick and tired of living with being so dumb. These kids had been told negative things about themselves and their nonexistient dyslexia for so long, that they actually believed that everyone els's life would be so much better if they were dead!



True, many dyslexics are gifted and benefit wonderfully from the proper teaching methods. However, if dyslexia wasn't a disorder, corrective actions would solve the problem for the individual. However, it doesn't work that way. Dyslexia stays with an affected individual until the day he or she dies. I have done well in my education and carrear. I have had a wonderful life. However, I will also be dyslexic and must live with this every day of my life.



My doctor likened dyslexia to diabetes. Some people use exercise, supplements, diet modifications, and life style changes to improve their life quality. Some of these people are able to come off the meds and insulin. Does this mean they no longer have diabetes? Of course they do! They have beat it into remission. The minute something changes--their new lifestyle or a change in their body, it will flare up again.



The same is true of dyslexia. Proper teaching, diet, exercise, supplements, habits, and modifications to daily life help many people deal with this disorder quite well. Many people compensate for their problems very well and actually mostly beat it back into a type of remission. However, when something changes--such as a surge of stress, not enough sleep, or too much junk food--the symptoms come surging back. Trust me, it's a real condition and has been a constant companion of mine for the last sixty years.



It can be safely estimated that about 15% of the American population deals with dyslexia in one form or another. If a disease was affecting the United States in this proportion, the CDC would be all over it. We need to get our priorities straight as a country. We have everything to lose or gain. It is our choice.

[deleted account]

my conclusion is now that dyslexia isn't actually a learning disorder but simply a gifted child that needs a different teaching method which I am afraid our current schooling system doesn't provide. I think it should be renamed teaching disorder but not Teacher disorder it is not the teacher's fault but a teaching method problem!

We know now by experience and result. A good place to start is with education-tech(dot)org(dot)uk and read their free download on sight words. dyslexic children need a) phonic and b) can't memorize symbols, so using images and activities to explain a word, works like a treat.

Susan - posted on 12/04/2012

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We were in North Carolina and that is a state I would not recommend to anyone. They have no services , monies, or anything. I really do not recommend the Charter schools. They offer nothing. We moved to upstate N.Y. and we are in a process right now of having the school district place my son in a private school that is recognized by the state when the school district has no remedial education to provide for him. The North east schools are much better for kids with disabilities because the parents have made the states be more accountable. Honestly, it has gotten a little better since the thirty years I have been in school and this is not saying very much for the system as a whole. It is truly disgraceful how our country treats children with disabilities.

Bobbi Jean - posted on 11/18/2012

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Ref: Learning Ally--Does your daughter follow along in the book as she listens? In addition to tutoring at the high school, I do volunteer consulting with homeschoolers in my area and on line. This sounds like something which could really help a lot of them. Thanks for your patience with all of my questions.

Kelley - posted on 11/18/2012

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Hi Angelia,



I live in Idaho and have a house full of dyslexics! We have struggled and triumphed over the years as we have worked to help our children work the system with this learning difference. The turning point for our family was back in 2004 when we were introduced to the book, The Gift of Dyslexia, and really began to understand the anatomy of a learning disability and the fact that it can be prevented! Perspective and orientation are daily rituals in our world and keep us on a steady path. Once I started using terms that teachers/administrators could understand...giving them personal examples of how a "picture" thinker or multi-dimensional thinker problem solves and how that type of problem solving leads to confusion with symbols (letters, numbers, sounds) their own resistance to the "dyslexic" issue seemed to soften.

The thing is, all students benefit from learning in a multi-dimensional way, and if our schools simply embraced a new tactic (clay) to join with the arsenal of research based reading programs that are being used we could prevent most learning issues from occurring. I have found that providing the list of characteristics of dyslexia found at http://www.dyslexia.com/library/symptoms... has been most helpful to illustrate my point.



I have a girlfriend who was successful at getting Wyoming to recognize dyslexia just this past spring....so there is hope! Good luck!

Dorrie - posted on 11/15/2012

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It's an audio book service for people with learning differences. Non Profit organization. It has text highlight function. The real benefit is that the books are recorded by real people (no nasty computer voices) and it is truly affordable. Unlimited downloads for $119 per year. We have never NOT been able to find a school text book or chapter book on their site. It is very comprehensive. She loves it and she is doing so well with it!

Bobbi Jean - posted on 11/15/2012

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I hadn't heard about Learning Ally. I'll have to check it out. I do know that the reading function on a Kindle is helpful. Is it anything like that?

Dorrie - posted on 11/14/2012

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After battling with my daughters school here in MD for 6 years, I finally couldn't take it any more and had our daughter tested privately by a neuro psychologist who specializes in learning disabilities. Not surprisingly to us, she tested dyslexic. When we asked the Doctor about accommodations at the school, she let us know that the school would not qualify her as learning disabled....even though she clearly is. That being said, I am my daughters biggest advocate and have worked it out with her teacher to allow her to have a reading device in school to help her in all of her reading assignments. I wanted to tell of you Moms with children with dyslexia about our reading software....it's called Learning Ally and I believe it is the only reason why my daughter can be successful in reading at school. It is the absolute best solution for her. Please check them out at learningally.org. She downloads her textbooks and chapter books to her iPod touch, and brings it to school to do her reading. Her teacher and the principal have been very "under the table" accommodating after seeing her results with the reader. We signed off on loss, theft or damage to the iPod while at school...and we bought her one that is specific for school....no music or apps allowed on it. being able to keep up with her classmates has given her a boost of confidence that she sorely needed. She is even in the highest reading group in the class now. I guarantee you that she could not be this successful without her reader :) Please, check it out.

Lisa - posted on 11/06/2012

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No , I live in Pittsburgh, pa and my school district does not even mention the possibility of dyslexia. From my understanding the state does not allow it, but that is heresay....I'm in the beginning of my research into this matter, but I plan on thoroughly exploring this issue"

Lisa - posted on 11/06/2012

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No , I live in Pittsburgh, pa and my school district does not even mention the possibility of dyslexia. From my understanding the state does not allow it, but that is heresay....I'm in the beginning of my research into this matter, but I plan on thoroughly exploring this issue"

Bobbi Jean - posted on 11/01/2012

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I got some questions about a point in my last post. I hope this clears it up. IDEA 2004 is a subsection of the federal Americans With Disabilities Act.



However, as a teacher of dyslexic students, a dyslexic myself, the mother of two dyslexic children (one reading, one math) the schools should stop arguing over fine points of law and do right by the kids.



After teaching dyslexic children in the public school system I retired. It was a constant battle to help my students. I secretly tutored a lot of them after school that didn't "qualify" for the program. Now I teach in a private school where I tutor. The situation is hard for everyone. Hang in there.

Bobbi Jean - posted on 10/31/2012

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Our legal system in this country is a real mess when it comes to this issue. Right now this is the clearest version of this that I can come up with:



The legal standards for determining the existence of a reading disorder or dyslexia, used in non-public school situations, are different from the required criteria in federal and state special education law. A child may meet criteria under one system but not under the other. Students identified with a reading disorder, must also meet the individual state’s eligibility criteria for the specific learning disability under investigation. The individual school district must determine that the child has a need for special education/services in order to receive remedial instruction.



Even if a child is identified with a reading disorder, by an outside source, (such as a pediatric neuropsychiatrist) it does not automatically qualify a student for special education or regular education remedial services. This is because each state and individual district operate independently of the federal government. Therefore, each state has it’s own supplemental laws and each district, its own supplemental regulations. What was originally meant to be a straight forward way of guaranteeing equal education for all under the law with Federal Law IDEA 2004, ends up as a tangled and frustrating mess.



The following websites will give more information about the legal side of this issue:



http://www.wrightslaw.com/idea/law.htm



http://www.legalmatch.com/law-library/ar...



http://www.dyslexia.com/library/ada.htm



I hope it helps.

Kim - posted on 10/31/2012

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Wisconsin is the same way. We are meeting with the next grade teacher every fall to see if he/she will do accomodations and honestly it all depends on the teacher. Very sad. Right now my daughter attends a parochial school. Sending her to public school wouldn't make it any better for her because they would only put her in LD classes and that would actually make it worse for her. We bought an IPad for our daughter to download her textbooks, accellerated reading books from Learning Ally (the AR is the school's program), and the tutoring. We are footing the bill for all these things. We need to have a bill to change things. States need to know this is important!

Bobbi Jean - posted on 10/30/2012

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Just an observation about Barton. She and her program are excellent! (One of a number of good ones--but one of the few which are clear in their presentations.)



hugs,



Bobbi Jean

Susan - posted on 10/29/2012

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Go to Susan Barton bright solution.com non profit approved tutoring by the CA department of education to learn how to tutor your own child or find a tutor. She has free meetings all over the country. The International Dyslexia Association website. Tonight HBO special The Big Picture - Rethinking Dyslexia. Write letters to your representative for change-sammiesmission.com. If we all work together we can create awareness and initiate change. Let's Write, blog, and talk about dyslexia.

Kari - posted on 10/29/2012

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I live in Oklahoma and am coming up against walls on how to get my kid help. He is in 4th grade and we just put him back in public school to get help. He was tested here at the end of 2nd grade by the public schools but they said it showed he had a "processing error" but he wasn't far enough behind to recieve the help he needed. So now that he is 2 years behind I figured they would help m but they are now saying he isn't 2years behind on reading, he is 1 1/2 which is the bs they said 2 years ago. I got a doctor diagnosis that requested he recieve an IEP for dyslexia bc that is what OK requires but it has been 3 weeks anti haven't heard a thing from them. What d I do to help? We need to start a movement to make schools pay attentions dn help kids sooner!

Charlene - posted on 10/25/2012

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Hi All, I have been reading a lot of your blogs. I have to say "thank God ". For all of you and your very personal stories. I am from the Hudson Valley area in NY, and both my 14 year old son and myself are both dyslexic. He has struggled from nursery school through the sixth grade. My school district (who I work for as a TA with special Ed) has I call it has been ban aid -ing him until a school psychologist told me off the record that he has dyslexia. From that point on I did my own research. The school paid for him to see a neuropsychologist and confirmed he indeed has dyslexia. However, they gave him a laptop with software that would help him with text to speech etc. the problem was now every kid wanted a laptop... His esteem was plummeting by the second. See I could not live with my son giving up. I had co workers telling me to sew. Awkward to say the least since I worked there. I contacted a private dyslexic school called the KildonanSchool.. The long and the short of it was they had a 6week academic camp. I applied to be a tutor there. I had to take a 70 hr. traing course in 8 days based on Orton Gillingham method. It was intense and very enlitnig! He made great gains over that 6 weeks and had a lot of fun too-:). My husband and I were able to send him there for his 7th year and this year. His esteem...... has gone from a 2 - 22. The down side is tuition is 46,600. Now what?..... Thanks for listening......-:)

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