Gluten-free

[deleted account] ( 15 moms have responded )

So I just read a bunch of the posted conversations and I really feel like you wrote my story! I noticed some of you talked about gluten-free diets. I would like to add that we put our son (who has spd) onto a gluten-free diet because he was showing all the classic signs of celiac disease. Well, it also helped his behavior! We were amazed! Our out-of-control child became the kid we knew he really was. He is sweet, loving and full of compassion! Before going gluten-free he was uncontrollable, overly emotional and aggressive, and just plain crazy! He had NO self-control! Now I know gluten-free isn't a cure-all but it helped tons for my son and even though he still has his "moments" life is so much better for him. We can ALWAYS tell when gluten got snuck into his diet because his mood changes-- and not for the better. Always talk to your kid's doctor before drastically changing his diet but it sure helped for us!

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Siobhan - posted on 03/04/2009

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Prior to comfirming an SPD diagnosis for our daughter, we went to go see a Eastern medicine doc who told us that she had the worst case of gluten-sensitivity that Eastern medicine recognizes and that she would not outgrow it. This was awful to hear because eliminating gluten at first feels like a monumental struggle every day - it does get better though. However, when the allergist tested her for wheat, she showed a very slight reaction, but putting her back on gluten turns her behavior for the worst. We went through a lab called Entero-Lab, pretty expensive, but it did confirm for us that she was sensitive to gluten (not allergic though).
Although initially I debated about a strict gluten free diet, and especially after all of the different test results came back, our Eastern medicine doc did say that neurological problems, like sensory and ADHD, in both children and adults can be due to a gluten intolerance and he has been able to reduce the symptoms of each with a strict GF diet. I do not know what others think, but we do see an extreme difference when our daughter is off of gluten and I am just not willing to chance putting her back on it, hurting her body more and potentially increasing the symptoms of SPD. The Eastern medicine has been treating food allergies A LOT longer than the western practice and they have a substantial amount of successful theories. Just thought I would share our story. Best wishes -
P.S. Our daughter is also highly allergic to dairy and citrus and kidswithfoodallergies.com is the best website I have found!

Amy - posted on 11/14/2008

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Wow! How old is your son? I have a 9 yr old son with a bunch of sensory issues and even more diagnoses from different docs. He doesn't seem to have celiac, but we've considered gluten-free. we are trying dairy free right now, but gluten is the next suspect. luv to hear about any recipes or strategies. good luck!

Stephanie - posted on 03/07/2009

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My son is 10 and his food intolerances include : wheat, rice, corn, oats, and dairy.  He does not have celiacs, but because his body could not naturally process these foods, he was also uncontrollable, overly emotional and aggressive...just plain miserable.  There are times when he does get some of these products in his diet, so we always give him a chewable enzyme with his meals, which helps his body process these foods.  The one he can tolerate (he also has SPD, ADD, Dyspraxia) is from youngliving.com.

[deleted account]

Siobhan, we love the natural approach to dealing with our son's spd and our daughters food allergies. I refuse to give her shots for them. I never thought to go to an Eastern Medicine Dr. Good idea. Your story is great and so true. My son still has spd and still needs therapy, but there is a significant difference when he has gluten. We do not give him any, but every once in awhile he gets some from someone else. Oddly, it also changes his body smell. He actually stinks the next day! Even if he has bathed!

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Teresa - posted on 01/04/2014

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thank you. my son has SPD and can be very agressive. tantrums over random stuff. insomniac... i think this is the change he needs...

[deleted account]

Did you know that papya enzymes help with digestion. We never use Pepto or any of those products. Papaya enzymes also taste pleasant.

Heather - posted on 03/03/2009

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Here's a great place for finding Gluten free products without having to go out of your house.



It's called the Gluten Free Pantry.  My mom is a Celiac and uses it all the time.  It even includes recipes along with all the ingredients available with a click.



glutenfree.com

[deleted account]

Yes, we very rarely allow food dyes, especially red. It is hard to avoid when we do jello (rarely). Since we do very little processed foods it isn't too hard to avaoid. My 2 yr old gets WIRED from red food dye. Think Thing 1 and Thing 2 on speed and that's Rylee! Luckily, we made the connection immediately!

Lori - posted on 12/05/2008

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Have you tried to cut out red dye in food products? There are other "colored" dyes that I try to avoid but red is the worst of them all. It is amazing how many products have red in them.

[deleted account]

I can relate. Our gluten-free diet cannot havge potato or rice because of my daughter's allergies! Have you tried Buckwheat--it is gluten-free? Also, Quinoa. It is versatile and a complete protein. You can get the flakes and use it as an "oatmeal," or use the flour as a substitute in recipes. Also, just regular grain quinoa can be used as a rice or couscous substitute. We prefer the texture and taste of quinoa pasta over rice pasta (we ate rice pasta before we knew our daughter was allergic to it). Chickpea flour is also a really great substitute and is gluten-free.

Jennifer Miller - posted on 12/04/2008

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Hey, that's amazing! I got diagnoised with allergy/intolerance to Gluten so I'm taking it out of our diets now, but I did try a few times with Logan and saw results too. Everytime I got it out of his diet, he started speaking. My family (including, Lord bless her, my Mom) didn't get it and would give him stuff that would blow the diet. But I sent them all to see him in Therapy and they are all getting on board. My husband is enjoying the rice pasta most of the time too ;) My problem is I have many food allergies including potato and corn, so I have to make just about everything from scratch! Most GF stuff has one or both of those in them. Its frustrating. I made a GF stuffing for thanksgiving! It was good! I was so upset that no one, not even Whole Foods, carried GF stuffing! Its amazing!

[deleted account]

You have to remember your son is a toddler and although he probably does avoid foods because of texture he also avoids them because he is 2. Hang in there it gets better! First, OT will help him deal with his adversions--not an overnight process but still nice to keep in the back of your mind! Second, you may not think so but his diet is actually pretyy good all things considered. My suggestion if you want to go gluten-free is start slow and small. Try using corn tortillas instead of bread--my son HATES gluten-free bread. The texture is weird. He also LOVES gluten free pancakes. They are frozen and are little. He loves dunking them. Other than that it looks like his diet IS gluten-free. Fruits, Veggies, and meat are our household staples. Search the internet for a couple of gluten-free ideas to try. It also may help to limit how much gluten he gets each day. If he eats cereal or toast at breakfast keep the rest of the day gluten-free. I must state before you drastically change his diet talk to his pediatrician. He will be able to help you keep your son healthy as you try to figure out how best to help your kiddo. :) Charlie's food adversions are still there, but they are not nearly as bad as when he was 2. We let him chew gum to help keep his mouth stimulated. Yours is a little young for gum but maybe he can have a chewie toy or a battery operated toothbrush. Stimulation really does do wonders for oral adversions. Let us know if you have any more questions. We are all learning from eachother here!

SUSAN - posted on 11/19/2008

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My 2-year-old son was recently diagnosed with SPD and sounds very similar to yours. Since this is all new to us, I hadn't heard about a gluten-free diet. My concern is that our son has feeding issues (very sensitive mouth, texture aversion) related to his SPD and eats very few things as it is: no meat or eggs, only 2 kinds of pureed vegetables and applesauce (he will eat bananas), yogurt, some crackers, pizza, grilled cheese, sometimes toast, waffles/pancakes, and french fries. Has anyone tried the gluten-free diet whose child also has feeding issues? I'd be interested in trying it, but I already feel so limited.

[deleted account]

My son is just turning 5 so I feel lucky we got control of this so early. It seems going gluten-free is so easy to do right now. I am also writing a cookbook (I have a daughter with 9 food allergies!). Gluten-free recipes are everywhere just google it! Let me know how it works out for you or if you need any advice or suggestions!

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