New to SPD. Is aggression and violence an indicator?

Laura - posted on 01/20/2012 ( 10 moms have responded )

33

0

2

I am in the process of having my son evaluated for SPD. We go in for our evaluation in February. I am wondering is it typical for these children to aggressive and sometimes violent? My son will slap us in the face, what appears for no reason. He is in trouble at preschool all the time for hurting other children. Sometimes it is intentional and other times not. Typical things like time outs or any other consequences for being aggressive seems to have no effect. I have been trying to do research on this.

I am overwhelmed with all the information. I seem to not be able to find any information on this issue. I am not sure if I am looking in the right places.

Any other parents go through this? And does it get better?



Thanks!

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Christel - posted on 01/30/2012

7

0

0

Also, the book "the out of sync child has fun" is a great for suggests for activties that help prevent the behaviors mentioned. Again this book is aimed toward those with sensory processing disorder. One thing that stuck with me from reading this book is the child will self therapy, look at what your child does, they know what they need. My son needs input to his body, and a lot. He threw things and hit, and banged his body on anything. So i provide him with appropriate activities, to prevent the inappropriate ones. Like pillow fights, using a crash pad (something to jump onto, like a mattress or pile of pillow) smashing ice with a hammer, throwing a ball out side, or throwing a large pop bottle with water, oil, glitter. Most of these are from the book. They really do help, and my son has fun. When he gets what his body needs, he won't seek it out in other more dangerous or inappropriate ways. I know some of these activities sound extreme, but the things he would do before were much more extreme. Once i found my son crawling up my car, grabbed onto a tree branch, then did like Tarzan and flung himself to the ground, just to fill the impact. I much rather have jump from the couch into a pile of pillows. Your son may be seeking input his brain says his body needs.

Christel - posted on 01/28/2012

7

0

0

My son had the same issues. Typically when he hit, it wasn't out of anger, just like you said he'd do it for no reason. What he would do more often was throw anything he could get his hands on. And yes time outs and consequences never affect the behavior. In our experience this is because the root problem was sensory not behavior. He had a behavior, such as throwing something, because he was dealing with sensory problems. Throwing and hitting and using too much force was caused from having a proprioceptive dysfunction. SPD can affect so many different senses, and this was one that had the most effects on him. This caused him to hit, tackle, throw himself on the ground, and he was very aggressive. He was constantly in trouble at school for hurting his friends. My son knows that these things are wrong, but his brain says it needs more feedback, and these acts fulfill this need. Everything will become much clearer after his evaluation, and things will get better. If he does have SPD, occupational therapy will help a lot. You and your son will learn how to handle these situations. Best Wishes

Heather - posted on 01/23/2012

297

20

44

I'm not a parent, but I'm an OT whose whole practice is built around testing for/diagnosing and treating SPD. The answer to your question is sometimes. Sometimes children act out aggressively to stop sensations that they perceive as threatening/uncomfortable (really more of a self defense mechanism than anything). Sometimes they are unaware that they've done something hard enough to cause another person physical pain. Sometimes they use aggression to give their bodies the inputs that the body craves (hitting someone, pulling hair, etc, all give the same type of input, called proprioceptive input, which is registered through the joints and muscles of the body and activated when the child does something hard with his body- biting can sometimes be related to this, as well).

Go for the evaluation- a child needs to be evaluated in light of ALL the symptoms involved. And if it is a sensory base- yes, it can and will get better with the appropriate intervention either at home and/or with a therapist.

Hang in there!

Polly - posted on 01/29/2012

14

6

3

My son has this issue and has been ask to leave school twice in the last few weeks. It is a part of the Sensory Overload and even though we know our child "know's" better, his mind is not capable of processing right and wrong at that moment. Teachers have a hard time understanding how to help our children and so tend to lable them as "bad" or "troublesome".

Time out did not work very well because for them to understand what the reason is for time out, they would have to be able to process.

What is working, at least for now, is one word orders. I know that sounds harsh, but our son is responding to this wonderfully. There is no process that he has to follow, only a one word directive.

When our son starts to act out physically or emotionally, we put up our hand and in a very strong angry voice say "STOP". Once he has hesitated, we then point to a safe area, (away from either us or whomever he is acting out towards) and in the same strong angry voice say, "GO".

Generally he will throw himself on the ground screaming or he will actually go to where we point. But the important thing is he is not hurting us or anyone else. Once the voilent moment is past we can then work on what he needs to put his world "right".

Ashley - posted on 02/27/2012

239

0

21

My son gets very very aggressive and angry at school or in crowds especially. Some times the things he says bothered him make absolutely no sense to me....

He hits his dad and grandpa in the face - we have really been working on that one. Time outs, good behavior charts, etc don't work for us - he is acting out because he is so uncomfortable in the situation. It doesn't matter the consequences, he is in "pain" and wants it to stop.



I thought they were going to kick him out of school last year, but they had the special ed people do evals on him and we found out about the SPD - now they have to work with him and he has a plan and is doing so much better - not to mention the stuff we do at home helps a lot too.

I am nervous about next year in kindergarden. I want him to be in regular class, but there is one teacher to every 20 kids, right now they have one to 4 and he can have the extra help he needs. I hope it goes well - I am determined it will. But I have to say I am so nervous. Talk to your school - if they have special ed people have them work on it. If they don't, get early intervention services.

10 Comments

View replies by

Bluegirl_021 - posted on 01/06/2014

1

0

0

I'm not sure if my 4 yr old son has SPD but I did the checklist on it and he shows all the signs on it other than the hard time learning in school but he doesn't go to school! My son is normally a loving fun smart little boy but when his tantrums come he gets so aggressive that it doesn't matter what it is he'll hit it. He bit me so hard he drew blood! He just randomly gets angry & when I took him to his doctor they said its attention he needs but we've tried so many different things with him and his sister which is only a yr older than him, but nothing seems to help him. Time out, spanking yelling none of it works he will just freak out & become very violent. I'm so overwhelmed with my son & I don't like to feel that way because I love my son & I want him to be a happy child but its hard. He doesn't like to play with other kids he's content playing with their toys and what not but likes to play alone. He will ask to go play with them but when we do he goes off on his own or like the other day was randomly throwing rocks at his friend all because he didn't want her to play in the rocks with him. So my question is what kind of doctor should I take him to so we can find out what's going on with him? Or is this just my fault he acts out? I'm so frustrated with this that I've joined a few groups trying to get ideas and suggestions but people attack me online saying I'm just a horrible mom& my son doesn't have the "diagnosis" of the group so I shouldn't post on it. I am sorry if I offended anyone for not knowing but still posting. Any one with ideas or suggestions PLEASE HELP ME!!! Thank you

Polly - posted on 02/12/2012

14

6

3

You may find a Body Sox will help with the muscle tone issue. I get a lot of my son's aids at especialneeds.com.

This site also has lots of valuable information to help understand what our children are going through. I had to invest in an indoor trampoline (not from their site as you can find them so much cheaper elsewhere) and have noticed our little boy's muscle tone has improved greatly from the jumping. He watches the learning channels and jumps for hours. Since it is the "rainy season" here, I am sad to say he is spending way too much time in front of the television. Lol, sometimes he puts his "costume" (body sox) on and jumps. It makes him feel better and as long as that happens, we are good with it.

One other thing I have gotten so far is the "cuddle swing". Ours is hanging in our living room and Josh will go sit in there if he is feeling overwhelmed or just wants to be "alone" in the middle of all of us.

Laura - posted on 02/08/2012

33

0

2

Thanks! It went well. The OT was going to get back to me in a few weeks with all the details. But she thought definite proprioreceptive issues with low muscle tone. She gave us a list of heavy work to try at home. Now if I could just him to do some of these things!

Laura - posted on 02/03/2012

33

0

2

Thanks everyone!!! We go for the evaluation on Tuesday. I can not wait. It has been a long process and I am hoping to get some answers.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms