My child is looking at Warhammer 40k, does anybody know what is?

Lucy - posted on 04/25/2014 ( 7 moms have responded )

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Recently my child started looking into a table top game called Warhammer 40k, it sounds like a game that would instill a better understanding of mathematics by measuring the range of movement, and how many dice to roll for "shots". It seems a highly intelligent game but seems on the violent side, im not opposed directly to that but the game requires going to tournaments and such, and it looks incredibly expensive, any advice on how to proceed?

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Alice - posted on 05/28/2014

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Hey, I play the game, it's pretty fun. It can be expensive but there are a few ways around that. One way to buy good quality minis without going through the full cost is Ebay.

Part of the game should be painting the miniatures. This is actually wonderful for building up that creative side and in some cases confidence. One of the things that is great about this game is its players. It's an awesome way to make like minded friends. While it is a war game, it isn't actually violent. The imagination of the player and the "fluff" is what can make it violent.

If your daughter is enjoying the game I would let her play. I would ask her "what is on you average 1000 point list?" (that is the average game size) Break down the model cost on the kits she names and come up with a way for her to earn them. We do 1 kit a month or two.

Right now the Codex is updating. I don't know which army she is playing, but if it isn't out yet that is the First thing she will need to keep playing.

Of all the games to get into as a woman, warhammer 40k is the most accepting. The players are typically very respectful and welcome any challenger.

If tournaments are out of your range you can see about finding her/her finding some like minded gamers at your local game shop. 1 to 4 games a month typically suffices.

I know this isn't the most helpful(i just woke up and saw this) but I play orks and would be happy to answer any questions you might have.

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Ann - posted on 12/24/2014

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I play the game myself, and from an educational standpoint I'd say that there is a lot to be learned on the artistic, creative side from painting and converting the models, making terrain, etc. Also, I've noticed that quite a few people, who are into miniature games, also seem to develop/have an interest in History and know quite a bit about it. I also play historical miniature games at a club and read about the battles before each game to give myself some context. I've learned quite a lot, for example, about the War of 1812, which has led me to do more reading about what non-military life (especially for women) was like during that time, etc. etc. It all stemmed from playing a miniature game.

So far as the game goes, the "violence" is extremely abstracted, sort of like chess. There is no blood or graphic scenes like in many video games. It is basically moving models, rolling dice and removing models. The math is pretty basic though, mostly just addition and subtraction with some measuring. Pretty light in that area.

Lastly, on the social side, you get to meet people, have to interact and get along with them, etc. Something that is lacking with video games. I've found that if you want to have a good group of people to play the game with you have to develop a sense of fair-play, give and take, and in general be a fun person to be around because it being a table top game, many exceptions and ambiguities crop up in the rules that have to be resolved by the people at the table.

It can be very expensive, but there is ebay, etc. Also, to keep the costs down, this is a good article to read. I agree with pretty much everything the author says from my own experience.

http://www.critical-hits.com/blog/2009/1...

One could use the fact that one's child desires a specific model as a lesson in saving or earning the money to buy it themselves with chores, babysitting, etc. depending upon the child's age of course.

Lucy - posted on 06/29/2014

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Your post makes less sense than the ending of bioshock infinite. It isn't a video game as (Lol) i am really just a thirteen year old boy that plays warhammer 40k and it is a board game. a BOARD GAME. If you read the beautiful conversation i have been having with alice you would (Possibly?) understood that. I fear for my generation, but their faults stem from the parents.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 06/11/2014

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Your daughter IS PLAYING A VIDEO GAME, and yet you think it's more healthy than playing video games...SMH.

Lucy - posted on 06/10/2014

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Yeah, since then we have gone into a store that sells Warhammer, Games workshop i think. She really enjoys playing and I've seen the models, they look really good! She paints them and plays the Imperial something, anyway thank you Alice you advice on Ebay, 1000 point list (I now understand the language connected), she now plays it regularly with a large portion of her school friends and I think that it puts her in a healthy environment with a great alternative to the constant social media, video games and even drugs that so many kids are seeking today.

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