WHAT'S YOUR VIEW ON HOME SCHOOLING VS. CONVENTIONAL SCHOOLING. WHAT'S THE POSITIVES & NEGATIVES ?

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Kathy - posted on 01/21/2010

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This is such a personal decision.

I have seen home-schooling go very well (kids got into Duke and Air Force Academy, etc.). I have seen public schooling go very well (Penn State, Harvard, etc.). Although a few of those h-s kids did go to a private school their junior and senior hig school years to make the college admissions process much easier.

I have also seen it go terribly awry. Parents choosing a curriculum just b/c it is faith-based or what their pastor wanted and finding out that it wasn't stringent enough for college admissions-at any level. Parents not supervising properly and the kids cheating on all the exams (ended up in a remedial public school just to graduate). Or, b/c of the great freedom HS allows, the kids roam and become involved in the exact stuff you want them protected from! (drugs, alcohol, smoking, pregnancy, etc.)

To home-school, you need to have an experienced home-school group to support your efforts. You need to know how to say "no" to your kids and stick with it. You also have to be able to let go when the time comes-which is hard for any parent of any schooling situation!

There are very few parents who can be a resource for every subject when they get older or more advanced in their studies. Be prepared to supplement with private schooling or tutoring. You have to be "on" every minute of every day. You must be supremely organized. It is exhausting. It can also be very rewarding.

I would have home-schooled if I had more than one child. But I knew my kid, and he definitely needed to go to public school, learn to deal with people that didn't love and adore him and get some real-world experience of dealing with people not like him. We supplemented with camping, scouting, music, sport and the arts.

Best of luck to you in your decision. Whatever you do, do it with a full and loving heart and you will not be disappointed.

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Tammy - posted on 07/21/2011

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It's something everyone in the house needs to be on board with that's for sure. It's easier to start from the begining but it can be done even after they have attended outside the home. There are many curriculums out there, you can even make your own. Personally we have moved in a more eclectic direction. I have gone topic by topic and looked for the one I liked best. Although for a first year it's sometimes an easier transition, parent wise, to get what I refer to as a "curriculum in a box" like Life pacs or something. The programs through public school systems technicaly aren't really homeschool, just public school at home. Although you do have the advantage of adding to it to beef it up and teach it in a different way. As for getting with other children, that is easy enough. Public school is actually an artificial landscape if you think about it. You can't find that model anywhere in the "real world". Friends don't have to be the exact same age and meet at the exact same location:) As an adult are all your friends the same age as you? Did you meet them all at the same place? Are you still in touch with even half of the kids you went to school with for 12 years? Probably not. LOL! Personally I would revert back to the educational philosophy and models of the 1700's and 1800's which produced some of the best and most educated minds of our county. They went to college at an average age of 12-14 back when academics were harder! Anyway, I could continue on for a very long time:) Suffice it to say, If you think it would be a good thing for your family then don't think in terms of blockades or problems but instead think of hurdles.:) Socialization? There's an APP for that! HA! *giggles*

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My experience with home schooling says that the keys are the cirrculum and the parent. Our state has an online option for home schooling that is part of the public education system. Homeschooling can be more rigorus academically or it can leave a child woefully behind. It seems that there are a variety of ways for children who are homeschooled to connect with peers, rec league sports, public library groups, home school groups, scouts, 4-H that kind of thing. I never tried it with my son because I knew I didn't have the patience to do a good job with him and that ultimatly our relationship would suffer because of it. Also, I am not organized enough to make it work for him.

Kathy - posted on 01/22/2010

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Jo-

just do an internet search on home schooling in your area. For example, a friend of mine was the director of a small HS group which provided very small classes and all of her kids have done very well with it. Even if you had an "only", there would be small classes and field trips with other students. You might consider doing the elementary years in your private school and then having a frank and honest talk with your son when he older and can understand the concept of what HSing entails.

I think it CAN work with onlies, but you know your family best and how that would work out. And you can try it, and if it doesn't work out-you can always re-enroll in a traditional school setting.

Having said that, I'd do the trial period before junior high, since you don't want to get into a hassle with transcripts, junior and senior high requirements, etc. The college admissions process is something to be taken into account-and you have to answer for every little thing you do as a homeschooler.
You will find that your 'only' will be way ahead of his peers in the maturity process (but not as mature as the girls....sigh) and he might have definite ideas of how he wants his schooling to go. I always gave my son the option and he chose to continue on in public school, despite the fact he had no close friends.

Jo - posted on 01/21/2010

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Kathy,



Your advice on home schooling was extremely helpful. It was informational, educational & practical. I too have an only son. Like you said home-schooling might be suitable for parents with more than one child. I'm starting to get the feeling that home-schooling might help my son excel academically but being an only child might hinder his social skills. But if I can find an alternative solution for that I'm sure my son would be benefited from HS. Thanks for taking the time to reply.

Jo - posted on 01/21/2010

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Loretta & Mandy thank you for your opinion. My son goes to a christian school & he's doing pretty good. So far I'm very happy with his school results.....he's outstanding. The only drawback is, I believe he is not challenged enough & there's not much I can do about it since he has an already busy schedule......time is the only constraint right now.



The reason why this Q popped up in my mind is 'cos I met with a few church friends who home-school all or some of their children. Looks like they are well ahead of most of their peer group. Both the moms & the children have some good things to say about homeschooling. I'm not sure if I want to do it right now but I'm definitely interested in it.....want to give it a shot....may be in the near future. I need to do a lot of research on this & also information from people like you does help a lot. Thanks again !

Mandy - posted on 01/20/2010

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I speak from experiance on this one. I was in a very small private christian school til 5th grade when my mom chose to homeschool us. I was homeschooled untill 9th grade. HomeSchooling is great if you have the time and patiencec to do it. I was raised in a very strict household we didnt watch tv not much music, there was never any talk about sex, drugs or violence. Before highschool my parents gave me the option to go to public school or continue homeschooling I wanted to meet lots of kids my age so I chose public school. That decisions was the worst one I have ever made. My suggestion is if you homeschool then stick with it.

Loretta - posted on 01/19/2010

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Hi Jo,

I think that home schooling is fine; it's a decision to made by family--meaning mother, child(ren), father, etc. Of course child's involvement would be age appropriate. Domestic schooling of children allows parent(s) and child to spend more individual time and undivided attention together. There's also the bonding, sense of trust, comfort, and if needed, room for firm discipline or tough love. There's a right way and a wrong way to teach child(ren) whether in-home, in-the-school or after school/homework. Children need to be shown and taught affection, that it's ok to show emotions, to hear and to say 'I love you' and when the going gets tough, to be given space and privacy in-home. The potential drawback may be isolation from peers, from activities in school, boredom in home, rebellion and social issues. These are only possible downsides to home schooling and they need not be if parent(s) make certain that home schooling is well-rounded or balances out in making child's learning, growth and development, social activities--etc, be wholehearted to meet all their needs.

Hope my opinion sheds a little light on the subject. MsRhet118

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