A few questions about cows milk for babies??

Nichole - posted on 08/24/2009 ( 6 moms have responded )

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I am confused. I am a new mom and from what I have been told you shouldn't give your baby cows milk till they are over a year, is this correct? If it is correct than why are you aloud to give them baby yogurt, cottage cheese and other kinds of soft cheese. This is all made with cows milk, right? This maybe a dumb question but I would really like to know the answer to this. If they are aloud to have stuff made from milk why can't they have milk?

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Charlie - posted on 08/24/2009

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Between six and twelve months, supplementing with solids (instead of formula) or very small amounts of cow, goat, soy or rice milk is less of a problem, as long as baby is still nursing for the majority of milk intake and baby is not allergic. However, babies under a year are more at risk for allergic reactions so it can be a good idea to wait.



After a year, other milks may be used, but are not needed (other sources provide the same nutrients). It's recommended that you limit the amount of cow's milk that your child receives (possibly other milks too, except breastmilk) to 2-3 cups (16-24 ounces) per day. Too much cow's milk in a child's diet can put him at risk for iron-deficiency anemia (because milk can interfere with the absorption of iron) and decrease the child's desire for other foods.

Some experts consider yogurt and cheese to be okay for most babies after 6 months. Others prefer waiting until 9-12 months. Of course, if baby has a cow's milk allergy or there is a strong history of allergy to cow's milk in the family, yogurt, cheese and all other foods made with cow's milk should be avoided until 12 months or later. The main difference between yogurt and milk is that the lactose in yogurt has been converted into lactic acid. Cheese differs from milk in two ways: the whey proteins are drained off in the cheese-making process (so only casein proteins remain), and the curdling enzymes break down the casein proteins into smaller protein molecules. For babies and toddlers, try to find the whole milk yogurt (not low or no fat), and avoid the yogurt with artificial sweeteners lots of sugary fruits

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Nichole - posted on 08/24/2009

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Frozen yogurt!!! What a great idea, I never thought of that. Thanks....He does love his yogurt, lol.

Charlie - posted on 08/24/2009

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Pediatricians say after one year you can give ice cream , But i am not one of those mothers that goes directly by the book i know my child is 9 months he has tasted ice cream twice and has been fine i wouldn't give it to him often though .

If you want something cool for him try freezing one of his yogurts or we have fruit puree in a squeezie pack i throw them in the freezer and he loves chewing on it !

Nichole - posted on 08/24/2009

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Quoting Loureen:

Between six and twelve months, supplementing with solids (instead of formula) or very small amounts of cow, goat, soy or rice milk is less of a problem, as long as baby is still nursing for the majority of milk intake and baby is not allergic. However, babies under a year are more at risk for allergic reactions (see below) so it can be a good idea to wait.

After a year, other milks may be used, but are not needed (other sources provide the same nutrients). It's recommended that you limit the amount of cow's milk that your child receives (possibly other milks too, except breastmilk) to 2-3 cups (16-24 ounces) per day. Too much cow's milk in a child's diet can put him at risk for iron-deficiency anemia (because milk can interfere with the absorption of iron) and decrease the child's desire for other foods.
Some experts consider yogurt and cheese to be okay for most babies after 6 months. Others prefer waiting until 9-12 months. Of course, if baby has a cow's milk allergy or there is a strong history of allergy to cow's milk in the family, yogurt, cheese and all other foods made with cow's milk should be avoided until 12 months or later. The main difference between yogurt and milk is that the lactose in yogurt has been converted into lactic acid. Cheese differs from milk in two ways: the whey proteins are drained off in the cheese-making process (so only casein proteins remain), and the curdling enzymes break down the casein proteins into smaller protein molecules. For babies and toddlers, try to find the whole milk yogurt (not low or no fat), and avoid the yogurt with artificial sweeteners lots of sugary fruits


Loureen that was helpful and makes me understand it so much better now. Thank you so much. I just found it really weird that a baby can eat all these things made with milk but not actual milk. lol. Do you know when he can have ice cream, cause his daddy loves ice cream and he is always reaching for it. It's so cute but I am scared to give it to him.

Tawni - posted on 08/24/2009

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I bought a really awesome book on amazon.com called "Food For Tots". It gives you tips on how to feed your baby from birth to 6 years old. It has definitely been very helpful for me! The book does say to not give your baby cows milk before the age of one and it could actually be dangerous!

Heidi - posted on 08/24/2009

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You read correctly.Cows milk is not recommended until the child is a year old. Cow's milk doesn't contain sufficient iron to recommend its use before that age

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