FEEDING SCHLD BECAUSE SHE'S TOO BIG???

Dani - posted on 06/21/2009 ( 29 moms have responded )

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MY DAUGHTER IS THREE AND A HALF MONTHS OLD... SHE WAS 8.8 AT BIRTH AND IS NOW 18.8 LBS ...I HAVE BEEN SOLELY BREAST FEEDING ON DEMAND UP UNTIL THIS PAST WEEK... THE DR TOLD ME AT HER LAST CHECKUP TO GET HER ON A FEEDING SCHLD BECAUSE IT COULD CAUSE PROBLEMS WITH HER CRAWLING/WALKING..... SHOULD I??? HAS ANYONE ELSE HEARD OF OR BEEN TOLD THIS... AND WHATS THE BEST WAY TO START... I DONT WANT TO BE THE CAUSE OF HER BEING OVER WEIGHT BUT I ALSO WANT HER TO TRUST THAT I'M THERE???

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Guggie - posted on 06/22/2009

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Here are the update growth charts for babies who drink milk:



http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns/gro...



"A growth chart isn't a test, where you are striving to get your baby into the 100th percentile. The growth charts show us the statistical distribution of weight, height , etc. in a particular set of babies (or children or adults). So if a baby is in the 50th percentile for weight on the CDC charts, it means that half of the babies of the same age in the US are heavier and half are lighter; if a baby is in the 10th percentile for height, then 90% of babies of the same age in the US are taller and 10% are shorter. Healthy babies, just like adults, can come in all shapes and sizes - a baby in the 3rd percentile can be just as healthy and normal as a baby in the 97th percentile. What doctors are generally looking for on a growth chart is that baby stay relatively consistent in their growth pattern (see below for why this may not happen with the current growth charts). Growth charts are only one part of the puzzle, however, and must be evaluated along with other factors, including:



What size are baby's parents? What were their growth patterns as babies? What about baby's siblings or other family members? Genetics plays a large part in baby's size, so don't ignore it.

Is baby gaining consistently, even if it's not on a curve?

Is baby meeting developmental milestones on or near target?

Is baby alert, happy, active?

Is baby showing other signs of adequate milk intake? "



"Healthy breastfed infants tend to grow more rapidly than formula-fed infants in the first 2-3 months of life and less rapidly from 3 to 12 months. "



1977 Growth Charts



The 1977 growth charts for babies under 2 years old, which are still used by many doctors, are based on a study conducted in Ohio from 1929 to 1975.



The babies in this study:



were primarily fed formula or a combination of breastmilk and formula

often started solids before 4 months

As a result, the 1977 growth charts are not a reliable indicator of the growth of children who:



are breastfed only

delay solids until around six months, as is now recommended by many health organizations

Guggie - posted on 06/21/2009

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Quoting Samantha:

You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.



Lactation is an endocrine function with a negative homeostatic control mechanism. Boiled down, this means that it is a supply and demand function of the body. The less the infant suckles, the less milk the body will make.



 



Yes, she will continue to make milk as you say, but that does not mean she will continue to make enough milk for a 3 month old's nutritional needs.



Every major medical organisation such as the WHO, AAP and CDC warn parents over and over again not to start solid foods until at least 4 months. Furthermore, all of these medical groups agree that exclusively feeding milk for 6 months is important for the child's health and wellbeing.



 



Furthermore, the APA came out against scheduled feeding and issued a statement warning mothers NOT to schedule nursing. This can be a downright dangerous thing to do, but even if the baby is not put into danger from scheduled sessions, there are still other disadvantages. For example, it can lead to future weight and eating issues because the baby is forced to ignore her own hunger cues and eat when she is either starving or not full. Another example is that the mother could lose her supply and have to work hard to get it back up, or even be tempted to give up nursing altogether.



 



OP: google for the WHO's recently released milk-fed growth charts.



 

29 Comments

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Elise - posted on 06/24/2009

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I wouldn't put her on a schedule. The bigger the baby, the healthier. My son was 7 pounds 14 ounces at birth, and at 4 months, weighed 20 pounds. He is now 5 1/2 months and still 20 pounds. The weight will level off and slow down the more active she gets. All babies are different at the rate they gain weight. Some gain a lot in the beginning and others it takes them a while to gain it. Feed her when she's hungry. Do not give babies water. It is empty calories, and too much water can mess with their electrolytes and could cause seizures.

Kate - posted on 06/22/2009

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PS - my daughter was 10 lbs 3 oz at birth, is still 99% for height and 95% for weight and NO ONE ever said I should put her on a feeding schedule.

Kate - posted on 06/22/2009

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Find a new doctor! Babies that are breastfed do not need to be on a schedule. This is called baby training and there are a bunch of people out there that are going to try to convince you that you should 'train' your baby to be how you want her to be. I would continue to bf on demand, look for a more supportive doctor and seek support from La Leche League, if you haven't yet. It can be very helpful to talk to other breastfeeding moms about the pressures of raising your child in an society that believes in trying to make babies grow up too fast! www.llli.org

Lindsay - posted on 06/22/2009

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My babies were on a feeding schedule from the beginning. From birth until they were about 2 weeks old, they ate every 2 hours. From 2 weeks until about 2 months, they ate every three hours. After 2 months they went to every 4 hours until they were taken off of the bottle. Now they eat breakfast, lunch, snack, and dinner.

Leslie - posted on 06/22/2009

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My son was a big baby. No one ever said anything about that to me and that sounds like bologna to me.

Mel - posted on 06/22/2009

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that does sound rather big my daughter only just reached 18 lbs around 13-14 months. like someone else suggested i would use a dummy be careful she is not just eating for comfort she may just want to suck and try to pro long feeds as much as you can when shes hungry. the hospital told me (altho my problem was the opposite mine didnt want to eat enough) to try and entertain her and wait as long as possible for a feed

Crystina - posted on 06/21/2009

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Well time is always an individual thing that's what I meant as far as about. I love growth spurts, I miss them in fact, I feel like that was the last time my son slept. :-( :-) Hehe

Guggie - posted on 06/21/2009

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Quoting Crystina:



Quoting Guggie:




Quoting Samantha:





Quoting Guggie:






Quoting Samantha:

You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.












Lactation is an endocrine function with a negative homeostatic control mechanism. Boiled down, this means that it is a supply and demand function of the body. The less the infant suckles, the less milk the body will make.












 












Yes, she will continue to make milk as you say, but that does not mean she will continue to make enough milk for a 3 month old's nutritional needs.










 
















I am very well aware of the fact that lactation is a physiological response involving the endocrine system. I was merely pointing out that reducing the amount of breast feeding the baby will do because of being fed solid food will not cause the mother to no longer produce enough milk to accommodate her baby's new breastmilk needs.










As for scheduled feedings, I completely agree. My daughter happened to have a poop/sleep schedule, but I never had her on a feeding schedule. To this day, she eats only when she's hungry, and eats until she is full. She'll be 5 in August, and is 44" tall and 38lbs.













I see what you're saying...but am just worried it will be lost in translation. If she severely restricts her 3mo's feedings, with or without solids that will reduce her supply. The point is that it will no longer be based on the baby's actual needs, but on the schedule itself.









The more milk that leaves the breast the more milk will be made. If milk sits in the breast for too long, as they are not for storage, it will send the message that less milk needs to be made. So yes is very easily possible to deplete your milk supply but on the contrary it is also very possible to build it back up as your body is constantly changing to meet your child's nutritional needs. Either way it takes about 48 hours to catch up.





Yeah I'm not big on the quote option either. Seems every time it quotes, it add more white space.



 



I think the 48 hours measurement is an individual thing. It always took 3 days on the dot for my milk to change. I remember those vicious growth spurts at 8 weeks and 12 weeks. oh my!

Crystina - posted on 06/21/2009

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Quoting Guggie:



Quoting Samantha:




Quoting Guggie:





Quoting Samantha:

You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.










Lactation is an endocrine function with a negative homeostatic control mechanism. Boiled down, this means that it is a supply and demand function of the body. The less the infant suckles, the less milk the body will make.










 










Yes, she will continue to make milk as you say, but that does not mean she will continue to make enough milk for a 3 month old's nutritional needs.








 













I am very well aware of the fact that lactation is a physiological response involving the endocrine system. I was merely pointing out that reducing the amount of breast feeding the baby will do because of being fed solid food will not cause the mother to no longer produce enough milk to accommodate her baby's new breastmilk needs.








As for scheduled feedings, I completely agree. My daughter happened to have a poop/sleep schedule, but I never had her on a feeding schedule. To this day, she eats only when she's hungry, and eats until she is full. She'll be 5 in August, and is 44" tall and 38lbs.










I see what you're saying...but am just worried it will be lost in translation. If she severely restricts her 3mo's feedings, with or without solids that will reduce her supply. The point is that it will no longer be based on the baby's actual needs, but on the schedule itself.





The more milk that leaves the breast the more milk will be made. If milk sits in the breast for too long, as they are not for storage, it will send the message that less milk needs to be made. So yes is very easily possible to deplete your milk supply but on the contrary it is also very possible to build it back up as your body is constantly changing to meet your child's nutritional needs. Either way it takes about 48 hours to catch up.

Crystina - posted on 06/21/2009

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Quoting Guggie:



Quoting Samantha:




Quoting Guggie:





Quoting Samantha:

You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.










Lactation is an endocrine function with a negative homeostatic control mechanism. Boiled down, this means that it is a supply and demand function of the body. The less the infant suckles, the less milk the body will make.










 










Yes, she will continue to make milk as you say, but that does not mean she will continue to make enough milk for a 3 month old's nutritional needs.








 













I am very well aware of the fact that lactation is a physiological response involving the endocrine system. I was merely pointing out that reducing the amount of breast feeding the baby will do because of being fed solid food will not cause the mother to no longer produce enough milk to accommodate her baby's new breastmilk needs.








As for scheduled feedings, I completely agree. My daughter happened to have a poop/sleep schedule, but I never had her on a feeding schedule. To this day, she eats only when she's hungry, and eats until she is full. She'll be 5 in August, and is 44" tall and 38lbs.










I see what you're saying...but am just worried it will be lost in translation. If she severely restricts her 3mo's feedings, with or without solids that will reduce her supply. The point is that it will no longer be based on the baby's actual needs, but on the schedule itself.





This quoting thing is weird. But the best way to sum up this situation in real words is- the more milk that leaves the breast the more milk will be made. If milk sits inside the breast (as they are not made for storage) it will send a message that less milk needs to be made.  Depleting your supply is very much possible if you go too many long periods of time without feeding, however frequent feedings and pumping after feedings will replenish the milk supply in approximately 48 hours, which is the amount of time it takes you're body to get the message and catch up. People just overthink breastfeeding too often.

Crystina - posted on 06/21/2009

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I hate doctor's sometimes. Babies suck differently on breasts depending on if they're sucking for comfort or food. She will walk and she will crawl. Breastfeeding helps develop the mind. I would say if she isn't showing any signs of crawling by 10 moths worry but as soon as she moving around via scooting or anything active she's going to lose weight. Most pediatric Doctor's aren't specialized in breastfeeding and they think they know everything. My personal opinion is feed her when she's hungry, comfort her when she's insecure, and love her when she's cute and if all those things happen at the breast then that's probably best. :-) Also, breastfeeding isn't forcing her to eat it's allowing her to decide when she's had enough and I think you and her are best at deciding when she's full especially because breastfeeding is so different from bottle feeding.








P.S. I'm a breastfeeding mom so this is coming from some knowledge on the topic. :-)

Guggie - posted on 06/21/2009

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Quoting Samantha:



Quoting Guggie:




Quoting Samantha:

You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.








Lactation is an endocrine function with a negative homeostatic control mechanism. Boiled down, this means that it is a supply and demand function of the body. The less the infant suckles, the less milk the body will make.








 








Yes, she will continue to make milk as you say, but that does not mean she will continue to make enough milk for a 3 month old's nutritional needs.






 










I am very well aware of the fact that lactation is a physiological response involving the endocrine system. I was merely pointing out that reducing the amount of breast feeding the baby will do because of being fed solid food will not cause the mother to no longer produce enough milk to accommodate her baby's new breastmilk needs.






As for scheduled feedings, I completely agree. My daughter happened to have a poop/sleep schedule, but I never had her on a feeding schedule. To this day, she eats only when she's hungry, and eats until she is full. She'll be 5 in August, and is 44" tall and 38lbs.






I see what you're saying...but am just worried it will be lost in translation. If she severely restricts her 3mo's feedings, with or without solids that will reduce her supply. The point is that it will no longer be based on the baby's actual needs, but on the schedule itself.

Samantha - posted on 06/21/2009

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Quoting Guggie:



Quoting Samantha:

You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.






Lactation is an endocrine function with a negative homeostatic control mechanism. Boiled down, this means that it is a supply and demand function of the body. The less the infant suckles, the less milk the body will make.






 






Yes, she will continue to make milk as you say, but that does not mean she will continue to make enough milk for a 3 month old's nutritional needs.



 






I am very well aware of the fact that lactation is a physiological response involving the endocrine system. I was merely pointing out that reducing the amount of breast feeding the baby will do because of being fed solid food will not cause the mother to no longer produce enough milk to accommodate her baby's new breastmilk needs.



As for scheduled feedings, I completely agree. My daughter happened to have a poop/sleep schedule, but I never had her on a feeding schedule. To this day, she eats only when she's hungry, and eats until she is full. She'll be 5 in August, and is 44" tall and 38lbs.

Marabeth - posted on 06/21/2009

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yeah, there is a difference between deplete and dry up. i wouldn't want any of my supply to diminish at 3 months, especially. that babycenter.com place is so full of ads and consumerism.. it makes me mistrustful.

Samantha - posted on 06/21/2009

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You can't deplete your supply of breast milk, as long as you breast feed on a daily basis (even once a day), you will continue to produce breast milk. Regardless if a baby is formula-fed or breastfed, it is recommended to start them on solids at 3 months. The first thing your baby should be started on is baby cereal (rice, bran, oat). Pick only one kind and stick to it for at least two weeks to ensure she is not allergic. Baby cereal is great because you can mix it with your breast milk! After your baby gets into the routine of eating cereal and has had at least two kinds, then she should be read for jarred baby food, or if you prefer, you can puree veggies and fruits at home. Again, only one kind at a time. You can should visit Babycenter.com, they have a wealth of information on what to feed your baby and when. I wouldn't be too concerned about her weight yet, babies are supposed to triple their birth weight by their first birthday. Breastfed babies do tend to weigh a little more as babies, but this is normal, and her weight gain will slow down once she starts walking and enters the toddler years.

Vicki - posted on 06/21/2009

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My son grew VERY quickly. By the time he was 3 months old, he was bigger than the 6 month babies at the local group. This group is for pregnant mothers and babies up to six months, run by dieticians and public health nurses. They all told me I was doing a GREAT job and to keep up the breastfeeding as he was clearly a very healthy baby.

Marabeth - posted on 06/21/2009

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i would continue to nurse on demand and ignore the dr. i'd be afraid of depleting my supply.

Hillary - posted on 06/21/2009

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Breastfed babies, no matter how much they weigh when they're infants, are less likely to become overweight in child- and adult-hood. Yes, she is slightly over the "average" weight for babies her age, but so are many babies, and wouldn't you rather have a happy baby who is nourished or an unhappy baby who is "average"? My daughter is 7 months and is wearing 12-18 months clothes perfectly. She is an appropriate weight for her length, and the only problem she has had is sitting up (not sitting, just the action of sitting up). To maybe put your mind at ease a little more, my mom breastfed me for 2 years. At 10 months I weighed 27 pounds, and I started walking. No, I didn't crawl, but I sure did walk. Go with your gut, if your baby is happy, and you're happy, that's all that matters.

Dani - posted on 06/21/2009

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thanks guys.... i know its different for formula fed babies and breastfed babies...the actualy "percentile" is based on formula fed babies...so its hard to judge...her dr is acutally on maternity leave and doesn't get back till july...her nurse practioner told me that...so i'll wait and see what her dr says because she is a breastfeeding mom too... thanks!

Jen - posted on 06/21/2009

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I mostly breast fed (only one bottle a day) and I put my daughter on a schedule at 2 weeks old. It made it much easier for when I needed to go out and about and get things done and not have a baby attached to me all day. Don't get me wrong I loved nursing, but I didn't want my daughter to constantly rely on that. 18lbs at 3 and a half months is way above average. She's doubled her weight in half the time she was supposed to (twice birth weight at 6 months). I know my daughter gained about 2 lbs a month when breast fed and slowed down to 1 lb a month when I stopped. If you want to keep feeding on demand then do so that is your choice no matter what your doctor suggests. If you are looking to put her on a schedule then pick the times that you know she's actually eating (not just comfort sucking) probably every 3 hours and stick to those times. What you could also do is cut back on the actual duration you spend at each feeding. Don't feel that by not nursing your baby isn't going to feel that you're not there for her. You can still have cuddle time and play time and she'll feel just as safe. Also if you're concerned about her development just make sure you help encourage her at each milestone. For example, she's probably trying to roll over (if she hasn't already done it) at this point so just encourage her. You've still got a few months for crawling and a while for walking. I had a late walker (almost 14 months old) and she was actually only in the 30th percentile at her 12 month and 18 month check up. So it can go both ways lol. Good luck with everything.

Tiffanie - posted on 06/21/2009

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I am in the same boat as you. My son was 7pounds 8 ounces at birth and now hes almost 17 pounds and hes only 3 months old. He put himself on a schedual every 3in a half 4 hours he will eat a bottle and he will sleep through the night. I also give him water inbetween feedings. He loves to suck he doesnt really like his sucky so I give him about an ounce or 2 of water in between feedings. Water is also good for digestion. It helps them go to the bathroom better. I tried palbum once a few weeks ago and he spit it out. So I am gonna hold off on that for awhile. But its your choice. If you feel u need to put her on a shedual then do so.

Guggie - posted on 06/21/2009

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oh my goodness please look for another doctor if you can. babies nursed on demand learn to follow their hunger cues.



as for the excuse about not being able to crawl...DD is in the 200th percentile at 7.5months and starting to walk unassisted. you might want to google for some big baby groups. some mamas believe bigger babies at birth and faster growth helps babies to meet milestones sooner.

Katie - posted on 06/21/2009

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http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns/gro...

Here's a kellymom article on it. I would keep feeding her as is and don't worry about it. Just make sure that you don't start her on cereal or anything else until her weight tapers off some--remember that they don't need anything but breastmilk for the first year.

Shannon - posted on 06/21/2009

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I did not breastfeed but try a pacifier if you haven't already. She could just want to suck and not be hungry, she will reject it if she is really hungry. I had to do that with my son when I wasn't sure if he wanted a bottle or a paci.



I don't know anything about weight or a schedule or that, so that's my best advice based on my experience with a child who just really liked to suck.



Good Luck!

Shannon - posted on 06/21/2009

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I did not breastfeed but try a pacifier if you haven't already. She could just want to suck and not be hungry, she will reject it if she is really hungry. I had to do that with my son when I wasn't sure if he wanted a bottle or a paci.



I don't know anything about weight or a schedule or that, so that's my best advice based on my experience with a child who just really liked to suck.



Good Luck!

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