"Need advice" VBAC

Rebecca - posted on 07/27/2012 ( 7 moms have responded )

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I have a one year old and 20 weeks pregnant with my 2nd baby. The first baby, after pushing with no pain meds (because they turned my epidural off) for 2 1/2 hrs I had to have a c-section, the Dr. Said my pelvis was to small for him to come out but he was only 7lbs 10ounces and before I got pregnant I weighed 112lbs so I'm not that big but I'm really thinking about Trying to have a VBAC and they say 2nd babys are usually bigger, but the dr is talking about scheduling the c-section but he said its still my choice in the end.... Some family that was in the room with my first are saying just do the c-section and my husban says to just do the c-section because we can just schedule it and go in and there will be no waiting and all that.. but I breast-fed and plan on doing it agin, and when we got the baby home at night, when it was time to feed I would have to wake my husband up to even help me out of the bed because the cut hurt so bad and I couldn't hardly take care of myself and I had a baby to care for ....... any advice????

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Oh, also my OB told me my pelvis was too small to birth my daughter. I had a 100% natural birth with my second.

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I had my first by c-section and my second was delivered naturally. I chose a VBAC because its easier to recover from plus its safer for the baby. I couldn't get out of bed for a few weeks with my first. I was in so much pain. My second was born at home and minutes after i had her i was up walking around, even walked myself down a flight of stairs when going to the ambulance. Wouldn't be able to do that after a c-section. Plus the medical risks, i copied this from a website

Infection. The uterus or nearby pelvic organs such as the bladder or kidneys can become infected.
Increased blood loss. Blood loss on the average is about twice as much with cesarean birth as with vaginal birth. However, blood transfusions are rarely needed during a cesarean.
Decreased bowel function. The bowel sometimes slows down for several days after surgery, resulting in distention, bloating and discomfort.
Respiratory complications. General anesthesia can sometimes lead to pneumonia.
Longer hospital stay and recovery time. Three to five days in the hospital is the common length of stay, whereas it is less than one to three days for a vaginal birth.
Reactions to anesthesia. The mother's health could be endangered by unexpected responses (such as blood pressure that drops quickly) to anesthesia or other medications during the surgery.
Risk of additional surgeries. For example, hysterectomy, bladder repair, etc.
Risk of adhesions.
Risk to future fertility and babies.
Increased risk of placenta previa in future pregnancies.
Risk that all future births may be surgical.
Maternal death (very rare). (6 in 100,000 for a scheduled cesarean birth.)
In cesarean birth, the possible risks to the baby include the following:

Premature birth. If the due date was not accurately calculated, the baby could be delivered too early.
Breathing problems. Babies born by cesarean are more likely to develop breathing problems such as transient tachypnea (abnormally fast breathing during the first few days after birth).
Low Apgar scores. Babies born by cesarean sometimes have low Apgar scores. The low score can be an effect of the anesthesia and cesarean birth, or the baby may have been in distress to begin with. Or perhaps the baby was not stimulated as he or she would have been by vaginal birth.
Fetal injury. Although rare, the surgeon can accidentally nick the baby while making the uterine incision.
Increased risk of asthma in babies born via cesarean section.

Nicole - posted on 07/27/2012

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I had two boys back to back both by c section. My oldest was breech and my second was just by choice. Why not choose what is familiar to you (c-section recovery) You have no idea how a VBAC will impact your body. With a little one and a newborn, its easier to go with what you have knowledge to prepare for. Get a small crib to put beside your bed so that you don't have to move far.

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Erin - posted on 08/31/2012

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i had two previous c-sections and will most likely be going with one more. I agree wtih Nicole. yeah revocery sucks but just think of it this way. it will most likely make you giggle too. Your lady bits will still be intact. atleast hats how i think about it. My son was born via scetion because the cord was wrappped around his boy. my daughter was by choice because of my liver condition and previous csection. the baby i am preggers with now will probably be via csection as well because i have had two previous ones.

Nicole - posted on 07/27/2012

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My OB gave me the run down of the pros and cons for both. I think that every woman has different experiences. I was also very confident in the hospital here in Chicago, its one of the top rated in the country by US News and World Report. My OB gave the decision to me as he did not prefer one over another as he felt the risks were different but equal in danger. I personally am not a fan of the unknown. All of the things that I wished I had/known after the first c-section, I had ready for my second. As long as you and your OB are confident that the decision chosen is best for baby, go for it!

Rebecca - posted on 07/27/2012

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Yay im glad it worked out for you, my mind is saying try it natural but most everyone around me is saying different. I think recovery would be so much better if I done VBAC I just don't want to go through what I did the last time and then end up having to have a c-section. And I have other risk with having them so close together, the old scar has a higher chance of opening...and my brain is so back and forth, thanks for the comments I wanted to hear other peoples thoughts about it!!!

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