A new tic- uncontrollable hiccups...

Stephanie - posted on 05/16/2011 ( 9 moms have responded )

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I am at a complete loss as to what to do about this. My daughter was sent home from school Friday because she started hiccuping. It is a new tic that she has, it is not actually the hiccups, but it sounds like the hiccups and she can be pretty loud when doing them. They got so close together that she was having a hard time breathing. She eventually hyperventilated and had a panic attack. After calming down, the hiccups didn't return that day.... Her teacher called me by 8:30 this morning, saying that she had the hiccups again and she couldn't get them to stop. I do not know what to do. She can't keep missing school but I can't leave her there to disrupt the other students. I tried talking to her over the phone, suggested that she do another quieter tic instead of the hiccups until she got home, but she insists that she HAS to do it. Does anyone have any suggestions??

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Kristen - posted on 01/29/2013

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Has your daughter been tested for PANDAS/PANS? Tics are one of the symptoms. www.pandasnetwork.org.

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Jessica - posted on 11/21/2012

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Hi, I'm new to this community and am so happy to have found other parents who experience what I go through and look forward to sharing and helping too. I have an 8 year old son who has turettes syndrome and we just went through two evals to rule out autism specifically aspergers. they told me he would have gotten the label but that they no longer diagnose aspergers as being on the spectrum of autism. my son first started having signs of ocd around 2 and 3 years old with horrible lip biting and licking and then the tics started at 4 years with eye blinking. We weren't givin a label until recently. they only told us he had ocd and adhd with adjustment disorder along with spd and now developmental coordination disorder. it has been a long journey and I still feel lost in how all of the labels come out in my boy and what is what and how to help him. we have done a lot of family counseling and he is finely being put in special ed full time with half days starting on the new year. we have home schooled because his snorting tic gave him such anxiety and low self esteem he became very suicidal and I came very close to losing him. We are still homeschooling and will continue to suppliment his electives until he can handle those classes as he integrates back into school. currently his ticks consist of snorting sniffing an eye roll with exaggerated opening and then a look off to the side. he takes Intuniv and we have had to go really low with a long transition into the next dose while he is intolerant of most meds for being to sensitive. this one is his last hope at getting any kind of relief. It also helps with his impulsively which he notices and wants it to help because he says "I don't want to annoy everyone around me cause I cant hold still, and I like to be able to sit to do my work". The fact that it sometimes takes the intensity off his tics is just a bonus.

Laurie - posted on 09/10/2011

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The school should never send a child home for something like that! They should be more understanding. I have two special needs children- I'd be upset with the school.

Leslie - posted on 05/18/2011

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When my daughter had the hiccup tic, they were actually hiccups. The first part of the tic we didn't notice...she was swallowing air, and that gave her the hiccups.

The recommended dosage for the NAC is 2400 mg. in dealing with compulsive skin picking; the doctor I corresponded with suggested we start there and increase to 3600 mg if we continued to see the behavior. Yale University is conducting the clinical study, and they are testing it in 600 mg dosage.

Scotie (my girl) takes the maximum dosage of Prozac 80mg, 3 mg of Intuniv, 3600 mg NAC, melatonin to help her go to sleep. As a Mom, choosing to medicate and searching for the correct meds and dosages is one of the toughest challenges, but sometimes, you just know that you have to find a way to help your child. She also goes to occupational therapy for Sensory Processing Disorder and behavioral therapy for coping skills.

An IEP is an Individualized Education Plan, and any child who has a disability has a legal right to have one. It will ensure that your child is legally protected from discrimination. For instance, sending a child home who is tic'ing is not acceptable. What happens if she develops a barking tic or an oinking tic? She still needs to go to school, and the teachers and the other kids need to be educated on what's going on and how to deal with it.

Stephanie, I'm sorry but I have to go to work now. I feel so much empathy for you. It is so hard to try to figure out all of this stuff on your own, and you just want to take care of your baby. I know. I will try to help all that I can. We've been on this road for while now. Take care.

Stephanie - posted on 05/17/2011

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Her doctor agrees that it is a tic. He has given me several ways to deal with them, but to me it is strange to deal with them like they are real hiccups. If it is a tic, is she ACTUALLY hiccuping?? So confused. It could be anxiety related, as almost everything she does is anxiety related somehow. haha! .... Leslie, how did you know how much to give her? I am absolutely willing to try that and will be looking into it asap! Does she take prescription meds as well? My daughter has leg jerking, arm jerking, and neck rolling tics that all cause her pain. I would love to be able to ease that for her... She does not have an IEP. What is that exactly? She attends a small private school so I am not sure even they know how to steer me in the right direction on help at school.

Leslie - posted on 05/17/2011

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My daughter had the hiccup tic for a while, too. I suggest that you try NAC- (N-acetyl-cysteine), an over-the-counter amino acid you can purchase at GNC, on Amazon, or ask your pharmacist to order it. We started it in March after I had contacted a doctor through Trich.org in search of help for severe compulsive skin-picking. Not only has my daughter's compulsion almost completely subsided, but all of her tics have SIGNIFICANTLY decreased as well. I know that TSA is currently researching it as a tic suppressant...My daughter is living proof that it works. She takes 3600 mg/day, but her dermatillomania is severe, and she takes the maximum recommended dosage. We have seen zero negative side effects. Her leg-shaking tic that had been so painful rarely happens anymore.

Does your daughter have an IEP? If so, you might want to ensure that it includes a "Safe Place to Tic" in it. My daughter is allowed to leave any classroom at any time she feels uncomfortable and go to the nurse's office or the counselor...sometimes to tic, sometimes to do biofeedback to prevent panic attacks.

Dana - posted on 05/16/2011

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Stephanie, I can't even imagine how hard it must be. Is it anxiety related do you think? Maybe an over the counter health food supplement for anxiety would help. What advice does her doctor give you?

Stephanie - posted on 05/16/2011

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I walked her through breathing, trying to calm her down, telling her to breath in and out slowly, told her to squeeze her hands when she has to hiccup.... None of that worked. And it always causes a headache... I don't know what to do. School has been so hard lately. I get so many phone calls, and I never seem to have the right answers for her teacher...

Dana - posted on 05/16/2011

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That has got to be so horrible for her. Has she tried breathing exercises? I'm wondering if that might help. It might take her mind off of needing to do the hiccups tic.

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