hi Mom's, my son has pdd-nos and has a very limited diet which includes no veggies, does anyone have any suggestions as to how to get some veggies into him, any tricks? he is very smart and can tell when there is something out of the ordinary on his sandwich, any suggestions?

Maureen - posted on 11/05/2008 ( 20 moms have responded )

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my little boy is almost three and is a horrible eater, very limited in what he eats, he mostly eats for breakfast waffles or pancakes or english muffins/corn muffins, lunch is either pizza, mcdonalds or grilled cheese, dinner is chicken nuggets, or pizza or fish sticks somethimes he goes without dinner becausee he fills up on snacks which i totally know isn't good but as mom's know sometimes when they are whining for something and you are trying to get something done you just give in. he has pdd nos and has some sensory issues, any suggestions for getting some veggies into him, also he does eat apples with cinnamon sprinkled on them as a snack sometimes and will eat grapes too.

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Angela - posted on 11/10/2008

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Wow - there have been some great suggestions! My 2 boys both have multiple food allergies, PDD-NOS and SPD, and my younger son in particular has some fairly intense sensory issues that carry over to eating. Right now he is in feeding therapy, and that is helping him experiment with foods, textures and colors. That has been helping quite a bit!



I use yellow pea protein (it's not allergenic) like one of the previous posts, but I get mine from Swanson Vitamins online because it's cheaper than Kirkman. It is so fine and without taste that it blends easily into things like applesauce, smoothies, oatmeal (back when we could still eat it), etc. My son used to not eat meat/protein of any kind, except McDonalds chicken nuggets, so I absolutely had to supplement his protein, but thankfully that is starting to change.



As for veggies, one of the only meat/protein products he would eat is meatloaf (surprisingly!). So, I would throw fresh veggies in the blender with enough water to puree and freeze them into ice cube trays to pop out into bags and then defrost when I wanted to use them. For a 1.5-2 pound meatloaf, I would add 1 cube of zuchinni, 1 cube of broccoli, 1 cube of cauliflower, 1 cube of carrot, and a half cube of beet. Then instead of using a prepared marinara-type sauce, I would use tomato paste to give a rich tomato flavor (and to cover the veggie smell/taste). If it needed more sauce, I would add tomato sauce with the herbs of my choice and not ketchup, for the same taste/color reasons, until it got to the right consistency. We can't use egg, oats or regular breadcrumbs, so I would use some flax or salba gel (which puts in omega-3 fatty acids!), and then some GF breadcrumbs, and top it off with some soy-free barbeque sauce. My entire family LOVES this meatloaf, and I have tried it with different combos of veggies, and they all seem to work out well. I think the key is to not have all green veggie cubes, but a mixture so the meatloaf doesn't turn a weird shad of brown/green. Also, I tried doing meatloaf without the veggie puree, and my little one refused to eat it. He didn't like the taste! :-) This idea was talked about in the book, "Deceptively Delicious." Her book can give you some neat ideas, and I have tweaked them to fit us.



One other thing I have found recently that has saved me some of the worry about the veggie thing is a product at Costco called "Drinkables Fruit and Vegetables dietary supplement." This is a liquid blend of veggies and fruits, with a berry taste, 2 gm sugar and 3 gm fiber and a juice consistency. Two tbsp equals 5 servings of over 40 fruits and vegetables and my kids love it! I don't typically give my boys juice at all, but I add this into a fruit smoothie with all of their vitamins and supplements, or I will give them just this juice with a splash of another juice to add more volume so it's more satisfying. This stuff is so good that I am taking it now.



Hope this helps!

Angela

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KH - posted on 01/30/2014

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Yours eats more than my 17 month old. The only thing he eats is vanilla yogurt, Cheerios, and vanilla wafers. He still has 2 bottles of formula and will drink whole milk. That's it! Hope he'll be eating as good as your little one when he's three:)

D - posted on 12/01/2013

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Thanks to everyone who posted suggestions for pickey eaters. My son will be 3 years old and he was DX with PDD a few months ago. And he is a pickey eater. Pizza, nuggets, cookies, apples & dry noodles are is favorite foods. I will be trying all suggestions asap.

Tara - posted on 01/01/2009

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V8 makes two juices with fuits and veggies. My kids love it! You could try making your own combos witha juicer! If he likes popsicles freeze the juice and he is less likely to know what's in the popsicle.

Dixie - posted on 01/01/2009

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Hey Maureen! My name is Dixie, your little boy sounds like mine. He has delayed meylination, sensory integration and the pediatrician thinks pdd nos also. We will find out that in Feb from Cincinnati Children's hospital. Your little man eats alot mor than mine. We get all of our fruits and veggies in him with V-8 fusion juice the one with a full serving of fruits and veggies with one serving of juice. He loves the juice and will drink it all day, (which helps with his bowels). I don't feel so bad about how he eats as long as he gets his juice. Hope this helps!

Lisa - posted on 11/12/2008

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hey mom, i know how you feel. my son is 19 months old. and when he was born they found out that he had vlcadd(very long chain deficany disorder) he cant not digest his fats, no fried food he is on a special diet he can have 10 grams of fat a day now. it kinda sucks he will never eat at mcdonalds or have pizza. but im sl glad that they found his disorder when he was born. thanks lot take care lisa

Gabriella - posted on 11/10/2008

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Sounds like he needs to be put on the GFCF diet- it usually means that they have gut issues and their body does not digest the gluten and casein and it gets read by the brain as an opiate so they are literally addicted to those foods -



go to www.tacanow.org - read it all and join the Taca Yahoo Group - they help with EVERYTHING - from biomedical issues to school issues to life issues. great people http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/tac... - there are LOTS of us with the same issues as you all on there. tremendous help.

i can also email you two articles I found helpful

Kathleen - posted on 11/09/2008

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Maureen,

The replies you got were great and one thing that helped us, my son is mild to mod autism, was the gfcf diet, ( I know not everyone sees results) but we did right away within a week of removing milk and casien products my son was calmer, (i am a chicken and didnt try to remove gluten for 5 months) It is very hard to keep gluten out of my son's diet as it is in everything. That being said, with the diet we added zinc from kirkmans in the liquid form my son has texture issues and his doctor said to try zinc as it can help with texture issues. It didn't work right away, but we are now getting my son to eat things that he would turn his nose up at before. pork, chicken w/o breading, beef all things he didnt like to chew, and he doesnt mind drinking water now. He also doesn't know it but in his baked goods (cookies and muffins, and pancakes) we slip in veggies. I use baby food to add to the mixes and then there are no lumps for him to find. We are finding it a slow process but even small victories are good ones.
Good Luck!

Maureen - posted on 11/09/2008

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hi Jennifer, don't worry, i appreciate all suggestions as i'm sure everyone else does too. please don't think about removing yourself at all. wey're all in this together :)

[deleted account]

In reply to Marie... I wasn't trying to make you or anyone mad. I have a son (age 4) with PDD-NOS also. I was merely trying to give hope that there are suggestions and books out there that allow you to "hide" good food in foods they will eat.



If people are going to take offense to my thoughts or suggestions, I'd be happy to remove myself from this group and go about my day.

Maureen - posted on 11/09/2008

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silly question but as far as vegetable juices go, should i get a juicer or is there a juice on the market with not a lot of sugar in it that i can get.

everyone again i appreciate all you are contributing, and to Cynthia, Marie and Heather (thank you so much :) it is true, it is so comforting to know we are not alone because sometimes it can feel like you are the only one in the world that goes through these things especially when you are around any other kids that eat everything. it can be very disheartening. but please keep all the suggestions coming i really appreciate it :)

Cynthia - posted on 11/08/2008

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Maureen & Marie, Your sons sound very much like mine... he also has that keen sense of taste/smell and reacts strongly to texture with a diet mainly of cereal, pancakes, waffles, french toast, milk, bread, bread and more bread :) Mine will eat bananas and grapes though (thats it for fruit) but no cheese, except mac n cheese & only if it is cooked for exactly 6 minutes with a little extra butter put in ...he will do chicken nuggets if they have absoultly no spice to them & he will eat plain skinless chicken (frozen tenderloins) cooked on the stove in just olive oil & then cut into perfect little pieces. When he was younger I was able to mush peas/carrots into the spagetti sauce.. but that ended when he was about 3... now & am just happy when he will eat the spagetti sauce with the noodles instead of insisting on plain noodles... the only vegie he will do now is corn... It causes me great anxiety... I was brought up to think one must eat 3 servings of vegies a day or who knows what bad will happen.... easier said than done with the sensory issues... It is at least nice to know I am not alone out there and it is not my fault for even giving him a plain piece of toast or a waffle in the first place :) Marie, I really like your idea of the Smell, Lick, Taste method... I do something like that but on the same plate,, but now I am going to give him more respect and put it on a seperate plate as you do... it really can freak him out when it is on his own plate,,, right there next to the waffle :) Do you know of a yougart out there that does not have bits of fruit in it & not loaded w/sugar such as the trix is?? He likes only the trix because it is w/out the chunks but it will keep him up even later. Soooo good to know I am not alone... I may make it through this yet :)

Thanks gals!

Heather - posted on 11/08/2008

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Another thought for you: Kirkland labs makes a golden pea protein powder that easily incorporates into many things...it is pretty bland and finely ground so it is pretty difficult to detect - it can also be used in baked goods. Kirkland is usually pretty good with samples. I picked up several at the Autism Awareness fair our local Intermediate Unit holds every spring. ~Heather

Marie - posted on 11/08/2008

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"Green" gummy vitamins?! I will have to look for those! Evan will take gummy vitamins no problem.

Maureen-

I just wanted to say that I 100% understand your frustration! Evan has Asperger Syndrome with a lot of sensory issues. When he was 3 yo, he ate a limited diet. Now, he is almost 5 yo and eats even less. He won't even eat chicken nuggets anymore. He literally only eats cereal, pancakes/waffles, bread, cheese, yogurt and the occasional apple with the skin peeled off. Anything else he will eat is straight junk- cookies, candy, french fries, etc. For a while, he would only drink milk if it was flavored! It was ridiculous! He panicks at the sight of new foods. My husband is basically beside himself over it all.



I mean no offense, but reading posts like Jennifer's just made me mad. Those are awesome suggestions- for kids without PDD and/or sensory issues. The problem is not that he is a kid. The problem is that he can not tolerate certain tastes, textures or even SIGHT of certain foods! So, that makes it really hard to get them to eat. My son won't even eat, FRUIT. And that is generally and easy thing for kids once they realize fruits are sweet. Also, those ideas work if your kid eats, soups, omlets, casseroles, etc. But for a child that will not eat mixed foods and only 6 or 7 foods AT ALL... it is a lot harder. I have also noticed that he has a keen sense of taste and his palate reacts strongly to texture. He can tell if there is crumbled cauliflower in the mac'n'cheese, even if my other kids can't (that is, if he would eat mac'n'cheese....).



Here are my suggestions for a child with PDD-

1) Use the Smell, Lick, Taste method. We never put new foods or foods he doesn't like on his plate- ever, We put it on a separate little plate of just hold it in front of him. Then, all we require is that he smell it. If he is very resistant, then we don't even require that. If he smells it and he is OK with that, we ask him to lick it- again, we let him stop when he gets resistant. If he licks it okay, we ask him to taste it, as in take a bite. A lot of times, he gets all the way to the bite, but can't stand swallowing, so we let him spit it out. We celebrate every time he even smells a new food. Basically, all we are doing is not allowing his to shut out other options.

2) I make him smoothies with protein powder and fruit and veggie juices. Carrot is the easiest to incorporate since it is sweet. You have to go light on the veggie juice or you can tell it is in there. I have also boiled baby carrots and green beans (no salt/ pepper, etc) until they are soft and then used the liquid and the veggie in the smoothie. Again, this has to be just a small amount or they can tell. At first, he would only drink chocolate ones (I used instant breakfast for the chocolate- again adding vitamins, etc). Now, he will do a blueberry/ strawberry one and a carrot/ mango/ strawberry one. I stretch the truth A LOT- "This taste just like strawberry milk!" or "This is just like ice cream!" The power of suggestion is important in getting him to do stuff.

3) Cut the snacks and milk. Evan, unlike Heather's child, does get hungry. So, if we allow him to fill up on milk and bread he is happy, but doesn't try or eat anything else.

4) I do agree that you shouldn't force the issue and have fun with it. Evan recently stopped eating apples. Now, my husband has "Apple Races" with Evan. It works for us. It may not for you, but we found just being positive and making it seem fun some times works.

Good luck! It is so hard for other parents and even our peditrician to understand what it is like feeding a kid with PDD! :)

Heather - posted on 11/08/2008

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In addition to ASD, my son also has debilitating sensory processing issues - food/eating being the most difficult to deal with. He does not physiologically get hungry, so "he'll eat when he gets hungry enough" doesn't fly with him - he simply won't eat. That said, he will eat things that are chewy, fruit snacks, etc. We found "green food" gummy bears at the Vitamin Shoppe that he will eat without a problem (this is the only way we can get multi-vits in him as well). Any port in a storm for us...HTH...Heather

Maureen - posted on 11/07/2008

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thank you to everyone that replied i really appreciate it and you all have great tips and ideas that i will def. try. i never knew that they made veggie nuggets that look like chicken nuggets i will look for that and the pizza made with veggies in the sauce i like that i can def. make that, the sausage roll is great too as well as the banana raisin pancakes and nutripals.

thank you so much :)

[deleted account]

does your son like sausage rolls, my son does not eat vegies because of how they feel in his mouth. One recipe he loves is sausage rolls, i use puff pastry for the outside and inside is a combination of one third sausage mince (you can buy it in a roll from wollworths), combined with a vegie mix i boil the night before... u can put in potatoes, pumpkin (not to much as it will change the colour), brocoli, coliflower, peas, pretty much any vegies that will mush up, put tomato sauce on top they wont notice. they are frezzer safe also as long as they r wrapped propperly. also avaliable at most grocery stores is nuggets made of vegies, u can get ones with no chunks in them they look and taste like chicken, check out the vegetarian foods, some of them are good.also

my i got my son to try a fillet of fish at maccas, i called it his special chicken burger and now he has that at maccas, not the best but better than a cheese burger! also if u make pizzas at home u can mix the mushed veg as before mentioned with tomato paste and use that as the sauce on the pizza.

[deleted account]

my son would only eat pureed food for the longest time so i would make stew and put his in the blender and give him peices of bread to dip in it.

Rasha - posted on 11/05/2008

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My son went through a phase when he wanted broccoli for breakfast lunch and dinner. So that is what he ate, I offered other things and if I was not watching he would try the other food on his plate, this went on for a month or so steamed broccoli 3 times a day. Even now at 4 he is a very picky eater, I introduced the nutripals (chocolate, vanilla, strawberry) and also a dietary supplement that is Mickey Mouse Club House brand also in the 3 flavors for when my son doesn't eat well. It works, expensive but it works, less expensive than Pediasure but the same thing

[deleted account]

One trick that often works for both fruits and vegetables is to find foods that your kids already like to eat, like smoothies, muffins, yogurt, etc., and find recipes that allow you to add fruits or vegetables to them, like banana or zucchini muffins.



Fruit isn't usually the big problem though. Getting kids to eat their veggies is usually the bigger challenge.



Creative ways to get your kids to eat more vegetables can include camouflaging them in with other foods, like chopping up and mixing vegetables in with pasta sauces, lasagna, casseroles, soup, chili, omelets, etc. or adding veggie toppings to pizza. You can even find recipes for things like banana raisin pancakes, carrot beef meatballs or zucchini cookies, that your kids might enjoy.



It might also help to:



- offer chopped veggies with a dip, like ranch dressing

- serve vegetables as a stir-fry

- let your child help prepare the meal

- start a vegetable garden at home so your kids can eat the vegetables they grow or visit a farm or farmer's market.



Getting kids to eat well, and especially eat fruits and vegetables is a challenge for many parents. To help prevent your child from becoming a picky eater, you should:



- start early by offering a large variety of foods to your toddler

- make mealtimes fun and don't try to force your kids to eat things they don't want

- look for creative ways to offer your kids fruits and vegetables



If all else fails, consider offering a multi-vitamin and talk to your Pediatrician.



It can also help to learn about the serving sizes of fruits and vegetables so that your expectations aren't too high. For toddlers, a serving of vegetables may be as small as a tablespoon per year of age and a 1/2 piece of fresh fruit. Older kids should eat 1 whole fruit, 1/2 cup of cooked vegetables or 1 cup of raw vegetables to count as a serving.



Books to consider: "Real Food for Healthy Kids" or "Quick Meals for Healthy Kids and Busy Parents".

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