My son has Sensory Processing Disorder. Is there anyone out there with the same issue? We have not been told that he has Autism..but he does have some of the symptoms. I would love to hear from someone that has just this and has not been told their child is Autisic.

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Natasha - posted on 02/13/2009

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Hi Robyn! I am a mother of 2 children with SID. My daughter was diagnosed at age 5 and at the same time my son was diagnosed at 2. They are now 10 and 7 years old. Life was rough in the beginning, we had them both in OT until our insurance company decided to suddenly quit paying. My husband and I did not know where to turn to next and it took a toll on our marriage. Shortly after their diagnoses we started attending a church. Our church started a support group for families of special needs children. Just knowing we were NOT the only ones on the planet dealing with these issues was a HUGE relief for us. Through the years I have learned to be an advocate for my children. We deal with sensory issues on a daily basis in our home and sometimes we still feel like our children are misunderstood. My husband and I unload on each other which is helpful. Life is getting better for our family, but we still have very frustrating days too. I probably didn't help you any, but I wanted you to know that you are not alone :-)

Jenny - posted on 01/17/2009

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Hi, my daughter has been describe as having Sensory Integration Dysfunction. I'm believing that it's probably the same thing. We thought/still kind of do think that she was autistic. Have you read the book, "The Out of Sync Child"? I found it very helpful. There is also a book titled, "The Out of Sync Child has Fun"

How old is your son?

Jenny - posted on 04/17/2011

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My daughter has Sensory Processing Disorder. Autism was never brought up at any of our doctors visits. She does has mild Spastic Quad CP and PVL. My understanding from her therapist over the years, she is now 7 1/2 years old, is that if you have sensory processing disorder that you have autism. There are books that talk about Sensory Processing Disorder they are called The Out of Sync Child and the Out of Sync Child at Play. They talk about Sensory Processing Disorder and different types of therapies to help cope. Also my understanding is that some of the characteristics of Sensory Processing Disorder are similar to autisms. My daughter rocks back and forth when we are out in public or if we are in busy places. It is her way of dealing with what to her is chaos. She likes music and rocks back and forth to it. For awhile she didn't like to be touched at all and now she likes to be hugged and snuggled but only by certain people and on her terms. She still mostly parallel plays with kids or plays by her self. My daughter has developmental delays and is developmentally at a 3 year old level. My daughter doesn't like loud noises, she doesn't like crowds, and sudden changes in plans, transitioning is hard for her. We found that by letting her play with my i-pod touch in public, like grocery shopping, eating at restaurants while waiting to order has helped her cope with everything going on around her.

Erin - posted on 02/13/2009

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My son and yours sound very similar except for the speech as my son only has a slight lisp but comprehension and vocabulary are very good.  He has been diagnosed also with SPD, ADHD and anxiety, which looks surprisingly like Aspergers.  We have been through the Autism assessment twice now, one at 5yrs and again at nine and both times have been told he doesn't have it because he can carry on a conversation with and adult and make enough eye contact to pass the testing.  He receives no funding for support from the school district but does receive funding for support at daycare.  I don't understand why these diagnoses are not included in the ones that receive funding!  My son can disrupt the class and negatively affect the rest of the classes learning but can not receive the funding for an aide in the class room to help keep him focused and help him interact with the other children appropriately.  When will the "powers that be" understand that we need to catch and support these kids early to really make a positive impact on their lives.  I'm tired of watching my son struggle but have explored every avenue.  He's such a sweet funny smart boy and his self-confidence is really taking a beating!

[deleted account]

My son is 10, he was born develomentaly delayed,he has A.D.H.D. and a sleep disorder.. he too has some sensory issues.. whitch are getting better.they thought he had autism but he dont he has aprexia which is a speech disorder.. He is in thearphy to help him with his speech and he was in thearpy for the sensory but  i now help him at home....he likes to be wraped tight like swaddleing him or put a real heavy blanket on him.. it helps to calm him...

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Katie - posted on 04/16/2011

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My son has sensory processing disorder and we are now going through his evaluation for Autsim (he is showing some signs but not enough for a diagnosis) His OT has been helping a lot!!

Melissa - posted on 04/15/2011

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My daughter was diangnosed with SPD in February. She does have a lot of the autistic characteristics but the psychologist ruled out autism at this point. They said that she is a little too social at times and makes good eye contact. She also has severe global delays, adhd, and anxiety.

Sandra - posted on 02/14/2009

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I am very interested in children with Asperger's Syndrome, my son has Autism Spectrum Disorder.  I do work in the field of Develepmental Disabilities and Asperger's is Incredible! Most people that have Asperger's are incredibly intelligent, almost genius in one aspect of their life or another - electronics, music, science, math, etc.. Speech tends to be very distinct, slow sounding, a person with Asperger's usually does not forget anything that they are told EVER, only they choose CAREFULLY when to use that information to their advantage.  Children/People with Asperger's are EXCEPTIONAL and should be treated as such, but can be very difficult to deal with because they are so introverted that simple things like taking a shower don't mean anything to them and they don't always understand the importance of why they should do that.



Asperger's and Autism are similar and are part of the same spectrum disorder.  People who have Autism are also very introverted, it is possible to get into their life slightly, not always, and not a lot, but through a lot of work you can make headway.  My son doesn't like animals, textures or anything that is not his idea, but by introducing things over and over and over and by having cats, dogs and a ferret- he can now sort of tolerate when a cat comes to him and its not his idea.   At night, he actually calls the cat to tuck him in!   There is hope for these children - the more we know and the more we teach - the more opportunities will be available to them!

Erin - posted on 02/13/2009

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Michelle - I live in British Columbia and Education is usually one of the first places to get funding cuts, so I know there is a lack of government money and that's why they are so selective with the funding.  We do get a yearly IEP but there really aren't the resourses available to make any headway from year to year.  I get so frustrated constantly fighting for, what I think, are basic rights of a child year after year!  None of the testing or daycare supports would be in place if I hadn't faught every step of the way. Before we did this last Autism Assessment a Pediatrician, Councellor, Principal, Teacher and me all were convinced he had Aspergers (his 15 year old cousin has already been diagnosed).  Now that this has been "ruled out" by the assessment, we have lost all hope of any funding for school support.  His school is wonderful and really do the best they can with what they have but I see all this wasted potential in Chris that would be tapped into with some support specific to him.

Michelle - posted on 02/13/2009

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Erin,  you haven't said what state you live in, and I am not sure if/how states differ, but your son's ADHD and anxiety should qualify him for an IEP and support, expecially if his behavior is disrupting his learning and that of his classmates.  Find the phone number for your State Board of Education.  They will give you insight without you having to "report" the school.  The Board member I spoke to even helped me dictate a letter to our superintendent in a way that got us an IEP meeting within a week, and they had fought me for 3 years.  Give it a try.  It can't hurt!  You should be able to enlist their help without having them contact the school unless you continue to have issues.  It is hard work, but WELL worth it! 



We ended up having to fight the system again this year.  Our biggest struggle now is getting the admin to understand how crucial the process of teacher selection is to our son.  After a 3 month fight, we just got word that after vacation he will be getting a new teacher, a former spec ed teacher.  Why wasn't she chosen for him to begin with??  It is frustrating, but unfortunately, in this situation, the old addage "the squeaky wheel gets the grease" holds true.  I completely understand watching his self-confidence go down hill.  My boy doubts himself at every step right now.  Very hard to watch after a great year last year.  Hopefully, changing teachers, (and lunch 90 min earlier in the day.) will be the start to repairing the regression of the last 5 months. 



Good luck to you!  I would love to hear if this helps at all.



 

Norell - posted on 02/13/2009

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I am in the same exact place you are right now. My three year old daughter has sensory processing disorder, not been diagnosed with autism. She doesn't have all of the red flags, but has a few. With the sensory processing disorder, so many things overlap autism. Right now we are just on the search for a diagnosis and rule out or confirm an autism spectrum disorder. She does receive OT, PT and speech. Good luck with your journey and I hope you don't have many roadbumps. I hope your child does well! If there is any way you think I could help you, let me know. I am just trying to navigate my way through all the hoops to get an answer myself! Good luck!

Michelle - posted on 02/13/2009

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Has anyone started with an SPD diagnosis and later had their child receive an Asperger's diagnosis??  If so, what type of doctor helped you with this diagnosis. 



I have believed that my son has Asperger's since he was 2 1/2.  The challenges for diagnosis are 1.  his language skills (comprehension and processing is very delayed, although his word formation and word choice are great, almost adult like. Previous evaluators can't get past the lack of delayed development)  and 2. social interaction.  He reacts very well with adults and younger children, however, get him in a group of peers and his lack of social skills is extremely prominent.  Because those evaluating him are usually adults and don't see him among his true peers, this has been a road block.  The third category is cut and dry in our case.  If they don't see it right away, they do by the end of the eval when he is getting frustrated with being there. 



Also, Sensory Integration Disorder was renamed Sensory Processing Disorder  (trying to find the date) because many people, including medical professionals, were confusing the acronym with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.  (Bit of history for you.  lol)



Hoping to hear other's experiences.

Michelle - posted on 02/13/2009

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Quoting Jessie:



I have heard a rumor that medical professionals are trying to get SID and SPD included in the DSM-V that will be out in a couple of years and listing it as part of the autism spectrum. But for now, its separate and not as accepted medically as a diagnosis by some.





Jessie,



This would be amazing!   Has anyone found any info to support this rumor?  Currently, most schools do not recognize SPD as a true disorder.  The few teachers that do, don't have the resources to fully carry out what they know our children really need.  At least in my state (not sure if federal) our schools are not required to include items in IEPs for SPD, because it is not included in the DSM-V. 



I have a 9 yo son diagnosed with SPD at approx 3 1/2.  Two years ago, he was diagnosed with ADHD, depression and anxiety.  I am not happy with this diagnosis.  Some see the ADHD and our decision to not medicate and don't know what to do next. 



--Michelle

Molly - posted on 02/12/2009

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Hi. I am new to COM, but found this thread very interesting. If anything, Robin, you have certainly learned that you are not alone out there!



I, too, have a child with SID, PDD-NOS, severe ADHD and various other issues. She is 14 years old and the interesting caveat is that she has a twin sister that has none of these issues. That has actually been a true blessing because despite all of her challenges since she was tiny she has always wanted to keep up with her sister. It has also been a blessing because they are our first born we did not really know any better, so we have never treated the girls different from each other, we have always had the same expectations.



We started our daughter in an Early Childhood Special Education program when she was just 2 1/2 years old - this meant she started full time school at that age. As difficult as that was as parents, we know it was the right decision. The girls are now in 8th grade and though she struggles some with classes, she is able to keep up academically for the most part.



We have seen a lot of specialists, OT/PT, speech, psychologists, had MRI's, x-rays, and just about everything that one can do. To this day she is still very sensitive to loud noices (fireworks, sirens, etc.), does not like the dark, does not like foamy soap. She still struggles with speech (even more so now that she got braces!).



My advice as a parent of an older child with these issues ... work very closely with the teachers (we are blessed to be in a smaller school district where everyone knows our Sarah, teachers and students, and they all treat her very well!). I truly believe that Sarah has done so well because we have never treated her as a "special needs" kid. She still gets speech therapy, she sees a psychologist monthly, she is on meds for the ADHD (and has been since 5 years old), she participates in dance class, church classes, cheerleading, track and other activities. We tell her, as we tell her sister, that she is expected to work hard at school so she can go to college and we tell her teachers and guidance counselors the same. (she can be a bit manipulative and will use her disabilities to her advantage if given the chance - she is bright - but she likes to not always act like it because then she gets more help).



Anyway - she is a great kid. And as I tell my younger son, that doesn't always understand why Sarah is a little "different", God gave us Sarah to make us better people!



My two cents .... good luck to you!



Molly

Erin - posted on 02/12/2009

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My daughter has sensory issues as well..she was diagnosed with Aspergers, but I don't believe that it is that severe. I would take your child to Pediatriac genetic disorder doctor..that way he can be diagnosed with the right thing.......we have had a lot of success with changing my daughters diet, taking out Milk and limiting sugar. We have also started her on allergy drops which have made a huge difference. have you read Jenny McCarthy's book about her son? It is Very informational. I also have a book on how to raise a sensory smart child. I am not sure of the author, but I found it at Barnes and Nobles. It has been helpful!

Tina - posted on 02/11/2009

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Quoting Jenny:

Hi, my daughter has been describe as having Sensory Integration Dysfunction. I'm believing that it's probably the same thing. We thought/still kind of do think that she was autistic. Have you read the book, "The Out of Sync Child"? I found it very helpful. There is also a book titled, "The Out of Sync Child has Fun"

How old is your son?



The Out of Sync Child was definitely my "bible" around sensory.

Terralyn - posted on 02/11/2009

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my daughter has some autistic tendencies but not full blown autism. She has not had any therapy though. I have just had to work with her myself. I have a son 2 years younger than her with Down Syndrome so I used some of the tricks I learned with my son to help my daughter.

Tina - posted on 02/11/2009

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Hey, my son was diagnosed wtih sensory integration dysfunction. i think the same thing. he was diagnosed at age 2 and he's 10 now. it's always been my understanding that the two are different, although sensory processing disorder is under the umbrella of Autistic Spectrum. That said ADD and ADHD are also under the umbrella of Austistic Spectrum disorder to give you some perspective.



  My son has shown some symptoms of autism, but he isn't autistic. We worked with OT and developmental interventionist age 2-3 through a program in Louisville KY called First Steps. Through this he also had listening therapy at age 3. Then, after aging out of First Steps, we worked a private OT from age 4-7. He also had vision therapy for from age 7-8. He attends a private school for children with learning differences and has since 2nd grade (he's in 4th grade now). His first year at this school he had speech therapy for the first time.



  The OT really helped him. you can ask me any specific questions... i'd be happy to share with you what i know and what i've experiences.

Beth - posted on 02/11/2009

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I learned speech by reading... meaning that sometimes, I will end up pronouncing what a word looks like. I was in speech classes for years. I'll put it this way...there are some things I cannot bear to touch, by virtue of it being too painful for me. Carpet is hard on my feet... I wear socks, shoes or slippers most of the time to avoid that feeling. Things that are both hard and bristly are hard too. There are things I need to grin and bear, by virtue of them being unavoidable. I did not learn to speak until about 5 years of age, I did not speak correctly, and to a point of being understood until about 10 or so. I had speech therapists and a special nursery school, exercises to learn to use my mouth, and send out air and sound rather than breathing in, as I usually did. I used a language of gestures at first. This was discouraged as much as possible, on therapists' reccomendations. I am learning sign language to help me out when I have a difficult time, as my hearing is degenerating as I age. Many surgeries were done trying to correct this, as well. I also use simple signs and ask simple questions for my daughter, using the "Baby Signs" books and going from there. On the whole, many issues may have caused this, from early birth (I was a 35 weeker) to bouts with scarlet fever and a few other things as a child. School was rough, but I found that when I used the same lesson format in a place where I was comfortable, I could teach myself. I will differ from anyone else, and many things that have worked well for me, may not work for others. But still, I try to lend a hand.

Jenny - posted on 02/11/2009

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Quoting Beth:

My former 33 weeker and myself have sensory intergration disorder. As of yet, any tests to diagnose Aspergers, etc. have not come in or have been negative. I have not yet been able to come to any answers from doctors except "it's a preemie thing". I am thrilled to find someone else who knows the problem, and would like to support you if I can.


Hi Beth,



I find it fasinating that you have SID.  How was school for you?  Did you have any speech or motor delays?  I'm glad to see that you have a child!  That gives me hope for my daughter.  If you'd be willing to share with me what life was and is like for you, I'd love to hear it.  I'd do anything for my daughter.  Just trying to make life easier for her.  Any suggestions from your experience?  Thanks for the hope!  If you want, you can send me a private message here or on facebook.



Jenny

Lisa - posted on 02/11/2009

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Hi Robin, my daughter has some sensory issues and she is not autistic.  Take a look at my group on facebook, Moms with children that have special needs.  You can get to talk with other moms and compare notes.

Beth - posted on 02/11/2009

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My former 33 weeker and myself have sensory intergration disorder. As of yet, any tests to diagnose Aspergers, etc. have not come in or have been negative. I have not yet been able to come to any answers from doctors except "it's a preemie thing". I am thrilled to find someone else who knows the problem, and would like to support you if I can.

Doreen - posted on 02/10/2009

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Hi Robin,



You are not alone. SPD or Sensory intergration disfunction is very prominent now and is linked to Autism but not labeled as Autism. Most Autistic children do have sensory issues. I see books have been offered to you as advice and I highly recommend. My youngest daughter has SPD and has been thru therapy since the age of 3. She is doing remarkably well. I am an avocate for early intervention. We as parents are our childs BEST voice! I highly encourage you to do as much research as possible and read every book on SPD (most are written by professionals w/ SPD children). Schools are highly aware and have acknowleged that SPD is a disorder that does affect a way a child can learn. I went thru my pediatrician and had wonderful support.  I encourage you to love your child just as he is! It's very fustrating at times, but he needs a steady rock who he can go to, to help him.



God speed in diagnosis and intervention!



Doreen S. from N.Y.

Jessie - posted on 02/10/2009

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I just wanted to chime in and say that these ladies are correct.... children with autism can have SID, but children can have SID and not have autism. To meet autism criteria, you must have a child with a language disorder/speech delay, repetitive motions/fixations, and social impairment. Although sensory issues can impact social skills and also cause some stimming, you typically don't find all three characteristics in a child that ONLY has SID. I have heard a rumor that medical professionals are trying to get SID and SPD included in the DSM-V that will be out in a couple of years and listing it as part of the autism spectrum. But for now, its separate and not as accepted medically as a diagnosis by some.

Suzann - posted on 02/06/2009

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I absolutely love the OUT of Sync Child and Out of Sync child has fun! I think it is a fabulous tool to share with your child's classroom teachers as he goes through school. My son was diagnosed with just that two years ago, but I also teach 2nd grade special education and it has totally changed my theoretical approach to the delivery system of lessons! Regular classroom teachers will benefit from sharing information about this since it is a relatively new diagnosis.

Cher - posted on 02/04/2009

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My 3 1/2 year old has SPD but not autism.  A lot of autistic kids have SPD as well as other issues.  So they are not the same thing and your child can definitely have SPD and not autism. 



We see an OT that specializes in feeding to help with his sensory issues related to his hands and mouth, which are the worst areas for him.  He also attends a preschool that is very sensory focused.  We realized this early on when he wouldn't eat baby food.  That progressed to only eating crunchy foods for the next year.  We are just now able to feed him meat & rice or pasta, but it is still a struggle. 



 



Find an OT in your area that can help you.  Most of the work you will need to do at home with your son, but an OT in a invaluable resource. 



 



Best of luck!



 

Diane - posted on 02/04/2009

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My child has sensory processing disorder also, she has been diagnosed as autistic, but only to keep special education services open to her.  SHe fit inot autism or early childhood developmental delay category and we went with autism.  otherwise services will end at 8 and i cant be sure that she will be ready for them to end.  someone on here mentioned the book the out of sync child, it was an excellent resource for me as well.  she has many other problems as well, but this one continues to be the prime source of frustration for me.. and her. 

Nicole - posted on 01/26/2009

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hi robin: my name is nicole and i've have a son with adhd and autism, but the doctor never told me he's austistic but by the sign's he got a percentage of it. he's 17 years old today and got a mind around a 3 years old, he's got around 30% on his left side of the brain and the right side normal. no it's not easy but don't give up we've got to be strong for them, there very special in there own way, so i would like to hear from you again. talk to you later and don't give up.

Nicole - posted on 01/26/2009

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Quoting Robin:

My son has Sensory Processing Disorder. Is there anyone out there with the same issue? We have not been told that he has Autism..but he does have some of the symptoms. I would love to hear from someone that has just this and has not been told their child is Autisic.



 

Jenny - posted on 01/25/2009

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Quoting Kara:



I am new to this site, but am very interested in everything I have been reading!  My daughter was born deaf/hard of hearing, and has been at the deaf school for a while now.  She is six years old and struggling at school.  She was evaluated and diagnosed?? with a visual perception disorder and sensory issues(seeking, and registering)  She also has an appt with pediatrician for ADHD testing. UGH!  I am wondering what the ramifications of hearing loss, ADHD, sensory issues are for her education?!  Very intersted in the diet thing...any more ideas???





Hi Kara, my daughter had trouble with her vision as well!  Even though she had 20/20 eyesight, she still had trouble tracking and with her depth perception.  We are located in WI, and we saw a vision therapist here.  The eye doctor and her therapists did exercises that worked on Corynn's eye-hand coordination, her balance, etc.  We have seen huge improvements in the way that she moves, writes, and reads.  I highly recommend it.

Nicole - posted on 01/25/2009

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Hi my name is nicole, I have a young teenager with special needs he is austistic and also adhd disorder. so it would be very nice to chat with parents with the same disorder.

Kara - posted on 01/25/2009

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I am new to this site, but am very interested in everything I have been reading!  My daughter was born deaf/hard of hearing, and has been at the deaf school for a while now.  She is six years old and struggling at school.  She was evaluated and diagnosed?? with a visual perception disorder and sensory issues(seeking, and registering)  She also has an appt with pediatrician for ADHD testing. UGH!  I am wondering what the ramifications of hearing loss, ADHD, sensory issues are for her education?!  Very intersted in the diet thing...any more ideas???

Sasha - posted on 01/25/2009

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i have a son who has sensory processing problems he has a lot of problems really i have tried lots of diffrent things that have been recomende via his ot but i still believe that he has other problems like being autistic he has alot of the symptoms i have been waiting for a long time to get all his problems sorted out he is at a speacial speech and laungage school to help improve his speach i just feel like iv been waiting forever for help and answers he is 8 now and im still waiting to get to the bottom of the problems if you dont mind me asking what other symptoms does your son have

Dondi - posted on 01/24/2009

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Dear Robin,
I'm new to the COM group, but saw your post and thought I would give my 2 cents. My Son is almost 11 and had SPD(still does to an extent). He was born at 23 weeks gest. He definitely has other issues and special needs, but at about 18 months we noticed the sensory thing. We started sensory therapy, done by an OT, and it changed his life (ours too). He falls in the "syndrome mix" spectrum, but I would say that sensory dysfunction tends to, but not always, be associated with other issues. It's very rare to have just a diagnoses of SPD. Now, I also have a daughter who is 6, born full term and healthy, but she too has some sensory issues. Unfortunately, insurance wont pay for her to have the therapy because she does not have a "traumatic brain injury"! :P She was just recently tested and was also diagnosed with ADD, ODD, and anxiety. So, again, while it can be a diagnoses by itself, it's usually coupled with other ones. I did read the out of sync child and thought it was GREAT! All in all, if you can have your son evaluated by an OT, you might get some very helpful info. It is a very frustrating process and disorder. Hang in there! You are doing great.

Dixie - posted on 01/23/2009

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Hey all!  My 2 year old son has SPD/SID...I have just finished the book Raising a Sensory Smart Child   it is an awesome book!    It gives alot of tips for things around the house...like organization techniques that actually work.  I followed them and it has helped my little man so much...he can acutally help pick up his toys now instead of freaking out because of the clutter.  I just bought another book called Sensational Kids Hope and Help for Children with SPD  by Lucy Jane Miller.  I'm a special ed teacher and one of my best friends is a school psych....she went to a training on spd and the author of this book was the presenter.  She called me immediately and told me to read it that it was awesome.  My son goes to Cincinnati Children's hospital next month....I think they will probably look at a PDD=NOS lable.....he does exhibit some of the autistic signs but is so loving...I don't know yet...we will see!  Good luck!  The deep pressure stuff really works with my little man......

Connie - posted on 01/23/2009

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hey y daughter is 2 and has the spd she is therp and now are starting to do therp w/ headphones with diff sounds we will see how it works

Connie - posted on 01/23/2009

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Quoting Robin:

My son has Sensory Processing Disorder. Is there anyone out there with the same issue? We have not been told that he has Autism..but he does have some of the symptoms. I would love to hear from someone that has just this and has not been told their child is Autisic.



 

Dennielle - posted on 01/23/2009

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that is so funny that you say that b/c i used that in my thesis.  i am going to get it uploaded this weekend.

Erin - posted on 01/22/2009

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Hi.  I am new to the circle but also have a child with SPD/SID (they are both the same).  Chris just turned 9 and has just had Autism ruled out for the second time.  They have decided that the SPD along with his ADHD and anxiety just look like Asperger's.  Hi is now on meds for the ADHD and we have noticed some small improvement.  Life is not over when your child has SPD...if you think about it we all have sensory issues to some degree, we have just learned to cope and so will they.  Hang in there.

Dennielle - posted on 01/22/2009

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Hello all!  I am going to have all the pages of my thesis, which include handouts and such from the OT scanned into my computer tomorrow.  Then I will post it somehow--I think I can insert the link which will allow everyone to just click on the link.



ADHD, Autism, and SID are all very similar regarding symptoms.  Weighted vest, deep tissue massage, fine motor skills, etc are all great ways to help with SID.  Also, schedule is very important.  We never did anything regarding diet, so I can not speak about that.



I will have the thesis up by the end of the weekend, so keep your eyes open.



 



Good Luck to all!!!!



 

Angela - posted on 01/22/2009

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Hello Robin. My 3 yr old son was first dignoased with autism. Just a few weeks ago they said that he doesn't have autism and that it's just spd..Autism and sensory processing disorder are a lot alike and are hard to tell which is which.

Stephanie - posted on 01/21/2009

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I think to receive the High Functioning Autism or PDD-NOS or Asperger's, he needs to have so many symptoms from each of the categories that Jenny described (speech/language, social, and stereotypical behaviors). If he shows signs alot of the signs, but doesn't quite the diagnosis in all three categories, then they give a PDD-NOS diagnosis. When the child is on the border I think it can be subjective and it would require a good specialist to tell the difference. But either way, therapy helps the symptoms.



 



Like I said above, my son has SPD with a lot of sensory seeking. Here are some of the things that I did and have seen a big improvement:



took him off all meds (asthma/allergy)



started fish oil (Nordic Naturals for children)



took him off all dairy products (including products with casein/whey protein)



Bought new food for him which contains no additives, preservatives, etc...(like Feingold diet)



bought him a weighted vest from otvest.com



 



My next venture will be OT (when I can find the time).



Good luck!

Robin - posted on 01/21/2009

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Do you not think that SID and Autism seem very close? I know SID is a symptom, but I just do not know how they can tell sometimes the difference b/t SID and high functioning Autism? What is your thought?

Jenny - posted on 01/21/2009

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Okay, we just saw the doctor. The three criteria that they look for in autism is communication (speech and language), social, and repetative mannerisms. (Flapping hands, spinning, obsessively staring at lights or moving items.)

April - posted on 01/21/2009

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My step son has a sensory processing disorder, it is due to his fetal alcohol syndrome and severe ADHDD. When ever we do something like go somewhere or i make a new dinner or anything we sit down with him and tell him what to expect so that there is hardly any freaking out or no response from him.

Jenny - posted on 01/20/2009

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Another thing that we did with my daughter that greatly helped her development was vision therapy. Even though Corynn had 20/20 vision, her eyes didn't work together. This affect how she saw things. Doing vision therapy helped her large and fine motor skills improve.

Another program that helped Corynn a lot is Handwriting Without Tears. This curriculum takes a multisensory approach to teaching handwriting. Her handwriting has gotten better since we started using this.

Jenny - posted on 01/20/2009

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What symptons does your son have? Does he talk to you or any other people/children? Does he show any repetative behaviors? Is he really bright is a certain area? There is such a wide range!
I'll let you know what we learn from the Dr. as soon as we know anything. We go in tomorrow, but my daughter isn't being tested until later in Feb.

What kind of therapy do you have him in? I know that with my daughter I have to do alot of work with her fine motor skills. Threading beads is a great activity. Also work on strengthening his hands and wrists. Doing wheelbarrels is great for that. Also have him write or color on an easel. (If you don't have an easel tape the paper to a wall.) Have him pick up objects with a tong. (the thing that you use to pick up food. I believe that it's called a tong) As that gets easier have him try to pick up things with a tweezers. (This is all stuff that you can do at home to help him with his fine motor skills.)
As far as the behavior... Do you feel that it stems from frustration? I know that my daughter has meltdowns when she can't do something or if something is hard for her. Practicing in small time periods with breaks greatly helps.

Jenny - posted on 01/20/2009

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Robin, do you have decent health insurance? We were fortunate enough to have our insurance cover the visit to the neuropsychologist. We only had to cover the copay. It might be beneficial to look into this if you haven't already.

I understand about the school system. we could not get answers from them either. It seemed like they weren't trained enough to diagnose and help with her troubles. I'm still not totally convinced that her diagnosis is correct. We're actually going back tomorrow.

Robin - posted on 01/20/2009

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It can be frustrating...I still wonder about my son...but have in therapy. That is what is working.

Robin - posted on 01/20/2009

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Please do so...I am looking for anything at this point. It can be very hard dealing with this and I have not been real happy with the school system not giving me information.

Thank you!

Robin - posted on 01/20/2009

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My son is 5 1/2 and has the same struggles with the snaps and etc...I have noticed more behavior problems,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,I have read all the books and still wonder...It is frustrating in family situations....just too much. Any advice?

Robin - posted on 01/20/2009

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Quoting Jenny:

Hi, my daughter has been describe as having Sensory Integration Dysfunction. I'm believing that it's probably the same thing. We thought/still kind of do think that she was autistic. Have you read the book, "The Out of Sync Child"? I found it very helpful. There is also a book titled, "The Out of Sync Child has Fun"

How old is your son?


I have read that and I still do not get a good feeling when I go in with the IEP.  They can not tell me and right now I do not have the funds to get Dylan tested.  I have my thoughts and knowledge  and I am still wondering?

Tammi - posted on 01/20/2009

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I have a 10 year old son that was diagnosed at age 2 with sensory integration disorder.  I do not know if it is the same as sensory processing disorder.  He has been looked at by several doctors and therapists and has never been diagnosed with autism.  There was a time when his neurologist threw that out there but was never confirmed.  He went to speech, ot, pt and developmental professionals until age 5.  His sensory processing is really great now.  He still struggles with many fine motor (writing, buttons, snaps etc..) things but is otherwise doing fine.  He can now touch shaving cream, sand and have seams in his socks.  There is much hope.  He is in special ed classes which I fought until 3rd grade but now I know that it was the best decision for him.  Good luck, would love to hear from you.

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