2 and 3 yr old

4 Comments

View replies by

Donna - posted on 04/22/2014

5

0

0

There’s no official age when to start potty training with your child. Children are ready to start using a potty when they are between 18 months to 3 years old. Usually boys tend to be ready a few months later than girls. How to know when to start potty training? When your child shows signs that he/she is ready and not before!

The signs are:

When doesn’t poo during the night and at day time formed poos at relatively predictable times.
His diaper dry periods of at least one or two hours. This shows that they can hold wee and store it it.
Can pull over pants up and down.
Want to show independence.
Shows signs of discomfort when diaper is wet or dirty.
Try to take off the diaper.
Tell you every time he need to pee or poo
He may stop what doing for a minute, or go somewhere else, or tell you that he’s had a wee or poo
You don’t need to wait till your child shows all those signs, they need to show most of them and you will feel if they are ready or not.

check out my blog about potty training it will help you: http://howtostartpottytraining.net/

Sharon - posted on 03/23/2014

90

0

15

WHEN YOUR CHILD IS OLD ENOUGH - THIS VARIES WITH EACH CHILD....if it isn't working, wait a few weeks and try again.
Make it a place where he can look at his favorite books (have about 3 sitting on the floor next to the potty) - or one of those drawing boards that he can play with.
Read the book
"Potty Training in One Day: A Guide for Today's Parents" by Narmin Parpia (May 8, 2006) Many parents have made comments in reviews about having to buy a doll, etc ...do not buy into their things they have for sale...get your own... (It uses a toy baby doll...get one that can easily bend at the waist and sit...we used a soft body one because it was pliable and sat easily without being so stiff and falling over)...I made up this poo poo training idea. Make some brown play dough -see recipes on the internet - some you do not have to cook or heat up and are easy - I used soy sauce to make it brown...then use a baby doll with "diapers" ( I bought some on Etsy that are flannel and have velcro) When you child is not watching, hide a small clump of play dough poo in the diaper. When you help your child take off the diaper, there is the poo. Show your child how to dump it in the toilet and help him flush it down the toilet..don't do the flushing part if your child is afraid of the flushing toilet sound or experience. Put the diaper back on the baby doll. A bit later, with your son's help, sit the baby doll on a toy potty chair (I bought one on Ebay - it came from the Corolle doll series) Without your child seeing, slip a small bit of play dough poo in the toy potty, while the baby doll is sitting on it. Make some grunting noises and then lift the baby doll up - wah lah - poo poo in the toy potty. Say, "Good baby!" Help your child take the toy potty to the real toilet and dump the poo into the toilet and have your child help flush the toilet. Hopefully your child isn't afraid of the flushing sound. If he is, forgo the flushing part. Put the diaper back on the baby. Do this routine a few more times through out the day. My 23 month old grand son was poo poo trained in one day...he already was pee pee trained. But he definitely was ready - he handed his mom his diaper and said he wanted undies like his 4 year old brother.

Sharon - posted on 03/23/2014

90

0

15

Potty training readiness checklist
Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
It probably seems like just yesterday that you changed your toddler's first diaper, and now you're wondering if it's time to start potty training. There's no magic age at which children are ready to start learning how to use the potty, but some develop the necessary physical and cognitive skills between 18 and 24 months of age
Learn the signs that your child is ready to tackle potty training.
Many parents don't start potty training until their children are 2 1/2 to 3 years old, when daytime bladder control has become more reliable. And some children aren't interested in potty training until they're closer to 3, or even 4.
Use the checklist below to measure your toddler's progress toward readiness, and keep in mind that starting before your child is truly ready doesn't mean you'll finish sooner – it's more likely that the process will just end up taking longer.
Before 12 months of age, children can't control their bladder or bowel movements, and some toddlers who show many signs of readiness still are physically unable to control elimination. Even children who can stay dry during the day may take a while longer to stay dry at night, though most children outgrow bed-wetting by the age of 5.
You don't have to wait until you've checked off every item to start training. Just look for a general trend toward independence and an understanding of what it means to go to the bathroom like a grown-up. For help getting started, read our successful strategies for potty training.
PHYSICAL SIGNS:
*coordinated enough to walk, and even run, steadily.
*Urinates a fair amount at one time.
*Has regular, well-formed bowel movements at relatively predictable times.
*Has "dry" periods of at least two hours or during naps, which shows that his bladder muscles are developed enough to hold urine.

BEHAVIORAL SIGNS:
*Can sit down quietly in one position for two to five minutes.
*Can pull his pants up and down.
*Dislikes the feeling of wearing a wet or dirty diaper.
*Shows interest in others' bathroom habits (wants to watch you go to the bathroom or wear underwear).
*Gives a physical or verbal sign when he's having a bowel movement such as grunting, squatting, or telling you.
*Demonstrates a desire for independence.
*Takes pride in his accomplishments.
*Isn't resistant to learning to use the toilet.
*Is in a generally cooperative stage, not a negative or contrary one.

COGNITIVE SIGNS:
*Understands the physical signals that mean he has to go and can tell you before it happens or even hold it until he has time to get to the potty.
*Can follow simple instructions, such as "go get the toy."
*Understands the value of putting things where they belong.
*Has words for urine and stool such as "pee," "tinkle," "poo poo," "poop"

SEE VIDEO: http://www.babycenter.com/2_potty-traini...

SEE "A B Cs of Potty Training" http://www.babycenter.com/0_the-abcs-of-...
GOOD TIPS (such as the right equipment...the "guard" that helps prevent urine from squirting all over can scrape your son's penis - ouch! Think about it...how anxious would you be to get potty trained?) You can teach your son how to hold his penis down.

Elizabeth - posted on 02/09/2014

21

0

2

Be careful look up articles explaining both sides of potty training. When they are ready they will literally tell you verbally or by physical gestures repeatedly. I am suffering the consequence of pressure potty. I hope that helps

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms