How do you get your children to stand in the corner for a time out?

Are there any tricks to getting your kid to stand in the corner for a time out? Sometimes they just won't listen!

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7  Answers

13 13

When my 5 year old was little I looked at it like breaking a wild horse. They resist and resist but stick to your guns and eventually they'll give in. The first time I tried time outs with him it took 45 mins for him to understand that I was not messing around. If he got up I picked him back up and put him back in the chair. It was torture for both of us because there were other things I would have rather been doing with my time. By the time my now 3 year old started getting time outs he'd seen his brother getting them and already knew the drill. IF they get up from a time out now and I have not excused them then they get sent to their rooms. We have their door knobs reversed so they can be locked in. They hate this with a passion but it drives my point home. So basically, stick to your guns be firm and consistent with time they'll get the point.

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27 13

I have a 3 1/2 and a 1 1/2 year old. My kids got the hang of it pretty quick. I had to stand in fron of them a few times so that they knew. I now just tell them to stand in the corner. I give it a few mins then i tell them to come to me and we talk about what they have done.
I started off using time outs but they wouldnt sit still and kept looking around at everything.
Just keep going with it. Your little one will get the hang after a few times.
I do have to keep saying - face the wall, with my littlest.

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5 5

You make a 11/2 year old stand in the corner?

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18 22

Absolutely! I have a 3 1/2 yr. Old & a 22 mo. Old. I use Supernanny's method, which is 1 minute for each year, so the little one gets a 1 minute timeout & the older one gets 3 minutes. I take them to the "timeout chair" & calmly explain why they are on timeout. Walk away & start the timer. If they get up, their time starts over. Once they understand you mean business, they will stay seated. (it's hard at first) When their time is up, explain again what they did wrong, have them apologize & give hugs & kisses. I don't think timeout works for every offense, I sometimes swat them in addition to timeout, especially if they aren't taking me seriously. Most of the time they do their time & we move on with our day.

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27 13

The thing is that the little one copies the bigger one. It has to be the same rules for both.

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17 1

I am a grandmother of 5. I take care of thre of them daily. 9 mths, 11 months and 3 years old. I used time out, one minute per year and the occasional swat for my 2 daughters and now my 3 year old grandson. It works really well. I have a very willful grandson. It takes patience but it is a lot more effective than a spanking. I also remove a favorite toy or the object that is causing the problem for hours or days, according to the situation. If it is a repeat offence then the object is taken for longer. Smaller objects are put up where the child can see it but not get to it, as a reminder for both of us. If he asks for it I can remind him why it is there and how long it will be before he can get it back. I remind him of making good choices. I gives us time to talk about the problem when we are not upset. I believe teaching him to talk about situations is as important as resolving the situation. He also gets a chance to voice his feelings. A lot of the time we end up talking about other things that are upseting him.

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12 4

I don't and never have given my child time outs... She is 3 1/2. It is not that I think she is an angel but I have other ways of dealing with "naughty" behaviour.

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1 21

When starting my boys w/ time out at around 1 1/2 & w/ my toddlers in Sunday school, I sit behind them & tell them I am counting slowly to 30 (60 for older ones) & that WE have to sit n time out until I am done. The older they are the slower I count. Then as they get used to it I make them stay without turning around, getting out, playing, or talking & each time they do it I start over. As they get older I switch to a timer instead of counting. It sounds like a lot of work but I have managed to get kids that listen to no one to stand in the corner just by being calm & consistent with when they have to go to time out. & by talking to them afterwards & explaining why they had to stay in time out & what I want them to do different the next time or even asking them why they were put in time out & asking what they shold have done different (& my 3 yr olds can answer them). I believe that time out works for some kids but not others. Each kid is different & you have to use what works for you but most of all I advice being consisent with why you punish. If a child knows their boundaries & knows that if they do something that they get into trouble every time they do it, they are less likely to keep doing it :)

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15 24

I can't even imagine sticking a one year old in a time out! I could never do that. I could also never stick a child in the corner sinceI think that's mean. I do the counting to 60 for my 3 year old but I count slowly as well. Boys especially need to know where the ending is. To tell them they are getting a 3 minute time out is too abstract. If they can hear you counting, they are soooo much more willing to take their time out and they do get it. If I do one of those, I won't have to have another one for the rest of the day. I started doing time outs at about 2 1/2. Good luck! Make sure you tell them you love them but you don't like what they did and tell them why it's not ok.

1 21

I do not make my 18 mth olds stand in the corner for 3 minutes. I make them stand there w/ me behind them while I count to 30. First b/c this removes them from the situation & it gives them time to calm down before we talk about what they did that was "ugly behavior." I always talk to them afterwards & tell them that I love them but I also tell them what I want them to do different next time. My kids could recognize almost all their alphabet by 19 mth old & carry on a conversation so I felt that making them stand in the corner for 30 seconds was well within their range of understanding. Sorry you disagree but I think that punishment should be based on each individual child. What works for one may not work for the other. & when you have twin 18 mth olds & a 5 yr old if you dont set boundaries then you are gonna have a very long day :)

0 10

Hi Rebecca I would be interested to know if you ever had to do this technique with both your toddlers ie. they were both mucking up together/at same time. I've had that trouble where disciplining 2 toddler boys is chaos and one parent doesn't seem to be enough. What would your advice be? Thanks.

1 21

Having 2 toddlers at once and only 1 adult can be crazy :) I actually put my toddlers in chairs in time out, or on the couch, or their booster seats at the table with the buckle snapped (if they were having an explosive tantrum about being in time out. (& I always use a timer so they & I know exactly how long they have to stay so I don’t forget how long they have or have not been in time out) Sometimes they would sit in time out ok & sometimes they would throw a fit. It may seem mean to some to buckle a child into their booster seat but when you have 2 toddlers throwing explosive tantrums and there is only one adult you have to contain the situation before it gets out of hand. I separate them from the situation and give them (and myself) time to calm down. It can be very stressful with toddlers because as you know sometimes they can control their emotions and sometimes they can’t. And sometimes they can be rational & sometime they can’t. I mean they are still babies (at least that's how I feel about my 4 yr old twins.) Sometimes they get it & sometimes they don’t. The trick is to always be consistent. My goal is not to punish my kids because they made me mad, or upset me, but because they broke a rule. They need boundaries and they have to know for certain where their boundaries are. I know people that only punish their kids when they get aggravated with them & the poor kids are wild because they have no idea what rules they are breaking because if mommy or daddy are in a good mood they don’t get into trouble for spilling their juice but if mommy or daddy are having a bad day then they get into trouble for spilling their juice. You also have to be consistent with the punishment & use what works for each individual child. Time out may not work for one but may work for the other. My friend also introduced time out for toys. If the kids are fighting over a certain toy then that toy has to go into time out. This way the kids are still being disciplined but in a way that they can learn how to share without directly punishing them. It has worked great! I also never tell my kids they are bad. I say that they are acting ugly this way they learn it is the behavior that I don’t like not them. & I ALWAYS talk to them after their punishment no matter what the punishment is or what it is for. I ask them if they know why they are in trouble or for the younger ones I ask simple questions that they can answer yes or no to, "like are we allowed to hit?" & I explain why they are in trouble & what I would like to see next time they are n the situation. (My 4 yr old twins can tell you that our house rule is "treat others how you want to be treated" :) Lastly I allow them to cry and throw tantrums as long as they go to a designated spot. I have a short hallway off of my living room. If they feel that they need to let out their anger over something that they are unhappy about and they haven't done anything wrong then I tell them if they want to cry or throw a fit they may do it in the hall but that they may not do it in the living room & disrupt everyone one else. & they are welcome to come back into the living room with everyone else when they feel better. The other tool I use is counting backwards from 5 (you can’t get any smaller than zero but counting up there are always more numbers) They know that if I'm counting I mean business & they have to be where I want them by the time I get to 1 (not they have till 1 to listen). My way is by no means perfect & it is not for everyone. But I am consistent & most of the time my kids are respectful, considerate, they share, they apologize unprompted even if something was an accident (because saying I'm sorry isn't a punishment, it's just being nice). Don’t get me wrong they definitely fight & are wild sometimes but for the most part the more consistent you are the more they will follow those rules. Sorry so long, I'm very long winded, hope this helped at least a little :)

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0 0

My 4 year old son is very sarcastic. (I'm the one to blame for that) lol...but when he doesn't listen,...he stands in the corner with his hands on his head. The crazy thing is, he actually obeys the command. ..but when i ask him is he ready to change his act?....he says no...and he's super smart and I know he understands. He has the conversation like a teen. I don't underestimate his mind because of his age...so I know he knows exactly what I'm asking. I don't know what type of discipline I should give him to get through to him?

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30 1

Its not about tricks..its about you standing your ground as the parent in the home. If it takes all day then let it, but YOU are the one in charge and need to let them know that their behavior is unacceptable. I took care of a 3 year old little girl who comes from a very disfunctional family. She was always yelling and being very mean. The first time I put her on a timeout was definitely hard, but SOOOOOOOO worth it! Because she is only 3 her actual timout time was only 3 minutes...but she stood there and fought with me for a good 30-45 minutes BEFORE her time was started. I was so frustrated I had to put myself on a timeout...which is OK for you to do...because it sets a good example for them and shows them that even we are not above a timeout! Be firm, stand your ground, and watch it change your world =)

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2 16

Yeah... We have never done the corner (and neither does supernanny ;) ). We do timeouts but when my kids were younger, I often has to put them in my lap. Now they sit against a wall or in a chair, but never in a corner

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