How much should a 2 month old be eating?

The amount of milk or formula a baby eats changes as the baby grows older. At 2 months old, about how much should a baby be eating?

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9  Answers

249 51

it depends on the childs weight. 2.2ounces per lb per day. so a 10 lbs baby should have 22 ounces per 24 hrs

2
0 0

This helped me so much, thanks!

85 27

as much as he or she needs :) they certainly let you know if they havent had enough!! my first was formula fed born at 4p10oz my second was born at 11pound and breastfed both were super hungry and I just fed them as much as they required - if they have enough in the day they sleep at night, and babies do not know how to over eat (it's only when people do stupid things like adding cereal to bottles that thier natural ability to regulate calorie intake is compromised....) hope that helps :) btw both mine are happy,healthy, and perfectly in proportion :)

2
0 0

A 2 months old baby does not need any type of formula milk or food, unless otherwise recommended by a registered paediatrician...... Baby's uptill the age of six months should only b breast fed..... Nothing else not even a sip of water.

1
0 20

Not all moms can breast feed.

464 0

Start with recommended portions of food.. if baby gets fussy like too soon after feedings and wants more, increase that next portion a little..depends on the baby..

My daughter was pretty text book, but my brother (my mom tells me) was like a new breed of human child..! He was on like 8oz bottles at 3mths old! But he was born 9lbs..

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235 30

It depends on how big your baby is. In the past all of my babies were eating around 2 oz. of breast milk or formula by 2 months old. However my son was born at 32 weeks and struggled with eating and by 2 months old only weighed around 5 lbs. so he was only eating around 40-70 ml. which if he was awake enough he might take 2 oz., but most of the time we were lucky if he took 1 oz. per feeding because it would take him sometimes an hour just to take 9 mils.

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235 30

That was bottles obviously. I also was trying to nurse him, but was only allowed to do it 3 times a day for 5 minutes a side because otherwise he was burning more calories with the work it took than what he was getting from it. We have no idea how much he got from nursing. Test weights before and after nursing showed he only got about 5 or 6 mils from nursing.

0 0

Hi Julie, my baby was also born at 32 weeks and is now a little over 2 months, who also drinks 2 lbs and spits up. Were you able to increase his milk eventually?

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5 4

Anamaria is three and a half months now, but by te time she wa two months old, she was eating about three and a half oz... she eats almost six now..

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3 0

2.5 ounces of milk per pound of body weight. For formula, make sure it has no corn solids or corn anything in it. These ingredients cause excess fat.

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87 0

i would suggest rather than corn causing excess fat, that 's feeding the baby too much that causes excess fat.

3 0

http://www.parenting.com/article/corn-syrup-in-formula Well, unfortunately......this is the actual truth threenorns... HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup) can make children fat. I share the opinion of many nutritionists and other doctors that the number one cause of the childhood obesity epidemic is the overconsumtpion of HFCS, mainly in the form of beverages. In fact, a study reported in the April 2004 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that people who drank beverages containing HFCS gained more weight than people who ate the same number of calories that day but did not consume as much high fructose corn syrup. Part of the problem is biochemical. When your baby ingests normal sugars (such as those in breastmilk, fruits, vegetables, or milk-based infant formulas), these sugars stimulate the brain with signals saying, "You've eaten enough. Stop already!" Fructose, however, does not trigger the satiety signals like glucose does, so it's easier to overeat foods and beverages containing HFCS.

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48 22

Each baby is different...from a breastfeeding perspective my boy feeds at least 8 times in 24 hrs.

1
87 0

as much as they need and no more, no less.

some days, it'll be 'x' ounces.

some days, it'll be more and some days less.

the biggest mistake you can make is to insist your baby "finish off this last little bit" because you don't want to just throw it out or insist they wait a half-hour, hour, or whatever until the next scheduled mealtime even though they're clearly hungry - that's how you get childhood obesity and kids with eating disorder because you've messed them up with their hunger cues.

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