Why did you choose not to breastfeed?

Breastfeeding can come with many complications and frustrations. What made you choose to formula feed your baby rather than breastfeed?

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40  Answers

0 2

I feel we are pressured to breastfeed our babies and our worth and ability to be a mother are judged on our willingness to succomb to thispressure. I can't say that I know of any breastfed babies that are never sick or that they seem to be any smarter than those that are formula fed. My now 3 1/2 year old son has always been in the 75th % for weight and height and he is almost too smart for his own good. It never seemed like even an option to me to breastfeed. Why? With formula my husband could share in the joy of the nighttime feedings. My baby could be fed anywhere easier than breastfed babies, I didn't have to cover up, or leave a conversation because my son was hungry. If he was hungry when we were out shopping or in church I just took out a bottle with water in it, dumped in the premeasured powder, shook it, and we were good to go. I never had to guess how much he was eating , I could tell you exactly how many oz he had consumed. Sure there is the extra expense of formula and bottles, but most women who breastfeed also purchase pumps and bottles, and also special nursing bras and pads. All considered I am not against other women breastfeeding, it needs to be a personal decision. I just wish that society did not feel the need to make us feel like less of a mother if we choose not to.

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14 3

well said!

0 7

I agree 100%

9 20

I wish everyone would think like this Amanda! I always hated feeling like I was less of a mother because my first born was bottle fed after a terrible try at breastfeeding. My son was breastfed his first 4 months but was supplemented about 90% with formula because my body simply WOULD NOT produce more than an ounce of breastmilk at each feeding. I even took Reglin (a stomach med that side effects are breast milk production) for several rounds. You have to stop taking it for a week or so in between rounds because another lovely side effect is it sems to make you have a really short fuse & go nuts. I also pumped like crazy when I went back to work just get get a few ounces for my son. so, I went through all of this just so he could have one full feeding of breastmilk a day...and to tell you the truth he's the one who has had all the illnesses! My daughter is almost never sick. Formula is JUST AS GOOD as breastmilk!!! People need to realize it's a perfactly acceptable healthy choice AND that not every woman are physically capable of breastfeeding. Here Here for two healthy choices!

2 12

I could not have said it better myself! Although, I got very lucky with not being pushed by the hospital nurses when I said I chose not to breastfeed. However, my daughter ended up being lactose and tolerant and had acid reflux really bad. When we found this out her pediatrician made the statement, "well if you breastfed this wouldn't be an issue right now!" I am so glad I am not the only mother who feels this way!!

0 0

I don't care how anybody feeds their babies but formula is definitely NOT as good as breast milk, that is more than medically proven. If you can't breastfeed or just do not want to, who cares as long as you feed your baby. However, making a statement that is completely incorrect and misleading is not productive (and I will not say if I breastfed or not).

1 0

Sorry to disagree, but breastfeeding is every baby's birthright.

1 0

Maybe you'll change your mind when you see the actual difference between breastmilk and formula as pasted below: Water Carbohydrates (energy source) Lactose Oligosaccharides (see below) Carboxylic acid Alpha hydroxy acid Lactic acid Proteins (building muscles and bones) Whey protein Alpha-lactalbumin HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumour cells) Lactoferrin Many antimicrobial factors (see below) Casein Serum albumin Non-protein nitrogens Creatine Creatinine Urea Uric acid Peptides (see below) Amino Acids (the building blocks of proteins) Alanine Arginine Aspartate Clycine Cystine Glutamate Histidine Isoleucine Leucine Lycine Methionine Phenylalanine Proline Serine Taurine Theronine Tryptophan Tyrosine Valine Carnitine (amino acid compound necessary to make use of fatty acids as an energy source) Nucleotides (chemical compounds that are the structural units of RNA and DNA) 5’-Adenosine monophosphate (5”-AMP) 3’:5’-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (3’:5’-cyclic AMP) 5’-Cytidine monophosphate (5’-CMP) Cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP choline) Guanosine diphosphate (UDP) Guanosine diphosphate - mannose 3’- Uridine monophosphate (3’-UMP) 5’-Uridine monophosphate (5’-UMP) Uridine diphosphate (UDP) Uridine diphosphate hexose (UDPH) Uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-hexosamine (UDPAH) Uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA) Several more novel nucleotides of the UDP type Fats Triglycerides Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (important for brain development) Arachidonic acid (AHA) (important for brain development) Linoleic acid Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) Conjugated linoleic acid (Rumenic acid) Free Fatty Acids Monounsaturated fatty acids Oleic acid Palmitoleic acid Heptadecenoic acid Saturated fatty acids Stearic Palmitic acid Lauric acid Myristic acid Phospholipids Phosphatidylcholine Phosphatidylethanolamie Phosphatidylinositol Lysophosphatidylcholine Lysophosphatidylethanolamine Plasmalogens Sphingolipids Sphingomyelin Gangliosides GM1 GM2 GM3 Glucosylceramide Glycosphingolipids Galactosylceramide Lactosylceramide Globotriaosylceramide (GB3) Globoside (GB4) Sterols Squalene Lanosterol Dimethylsterol Methosterol Lathosterol Desmosterol Triacylglycerol Cholesterol 7-dehydrocholesterol Stigma-and campesterol 7-ketocholesterol Sitosterol β-lathosterol Vitamin D metabolites Steroid hormones Vitamins Vitamin A Beta carotene Vitamin B6 Vitamin B8 (Inositol) Vitamin B12 Vitamin C Vitamin D Vitamin E a-Tocopherol Vitamin K Thiamine Riboflavin Niacin Folic acid Pantothenic acid Biotin Minerals Calcium Sodium Potassium Iron Zinc Chloride Phosphorus Magnesium Copper Manganese Iodine Selenium Choline Sulpher Chromium Cobalt Fluorine Nickel Metal Molybdenum (essential element in many enzymes) Growth Factors (aid in the maturation of the intestinal lining) Cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) IL-2 IL-4 IL-6 IL-8 IL-10 Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) Platelet derived growth factors (PDGF) Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Hepatocyte growth factor -α (HGF-α) HGF-β Tumor necrosis factor-α Interferon-γ Epithelial growth factor (EGF) Transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) TGF β1 TGF-β2 Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (also known as somatomedin C) Insulin-like growth factor-II Nerve growth factor (NGF) Erythropoietin Peptides (combinations of amino acids) HMGF I (Human growth factor) HMGF II HMGF III Cholecystokinin (CCK) β-endorphins Parathyroid hormone (PTH) Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) β-defensin-1 Calcitonin Gastrin Motilin Bombesin (gastric releasing peptide, also known as neuromedin B) Neurotensin Somatostatin Hormones (chemical messengers that carry signals from one cell, or group of cells, to another via the blood) Cortisol Triiodothyronine (T3) Thyroxine (T4) Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) (also known as thyrotropin) Thyroid releasing hormone (TRH) Prolactin Oxytocin Insulin Corticosterone Thrombopoietin Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) GRH Leptin (aids in regulation of food intake) Ghrelin (aids in regulation of food intake) Adiponectin Feedback inhibitor of lactation (FIL) Eicosanoids Prostaglandins (enzymatically derived from fatty acids) PG-E1 PG-E2 PG-F2 Leukotrienes Thromboxanes Prostacyclins Enzymes (catalysts that support chemical reactions in the body) Amylase Arysulfatase Catalase Histaminase Lipase Lysozyme PAF-acetylhydrolase Phosphatase Xanthine oxidase Antiproteases (thought to bind themselves to macromolecules such as enzymes and as a result prevent allergic and anaphylactic reactions) a-1-antitrypsin a-1-antichymotrypsin Antimicrobial factors (are used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects, such as bacteria and viruses) Leukocytes (white blood cells) Phagocytes Basophils Neutrophils Eoisinophils Macrophages Lymphocytes B lymphocytes (also known as B cells) T lymphocytes (also known as C cells) sIgA (Secretory immunoglobulin A) (the most important antiinfective factor) IgA2 IgG IgD IgM IgE Complement C1 Complement C2 Complement C3 Complement C4 Complement C5 Complement C6 Complement C7 Complement C8 Complement C9 Glycoproteins Mucins (attaches to bacteria and viruses to prevent them from clinging to mucousal tissues) Lactadherin Alpha-lactoglobulin Alpha-2 macroglobulin Lewis antigens Ribonuclease Haemagglutinin inhibitors Bifidus Factor (increases growth of Lactobacillus bifidus - which is a good bacteria) Lactoferrin (binds to iron which prevents harmful bacteria from using the iron to grow) Lactoperoxidase B12 binding protein (deprives microorganisms of vitamin B12) Fibronectin (makes phagocytes more aggressive, minimizes inflammation, and repairs damage caused by inflammation) Oligosaccharides (more than 200 different kinds!) FORMULA MILK Water Carbohydrates Lactose Corn maltodextrin Protein Partially hydrolyzed reduced minerals whey protein concentrate (from cow’s milk) Fats Palm olein Soybean oil Coconut oil High oleic safflower oil (or sunflower oil) M. alpina oil (Fungal DHA) C.cohnii oil (Algal ARA) Minerals Potassium citrate Potassium phosphate Calcium chloride Tricalcium phosphate Sodium citrate Magnesium chloride Ferrous sulphate Zinc sulphate Sodium chloride Copper sulphate Potassium iodide Manganese sulphate Sodium selenate Vitamins Sodium ascorbate Inositol Choline bitartrate Alpha-Tocopheryl acetate Niacinamide Calcium pantothenate Riboflavin Vitamin A acetate Pyridoxine hydrochloride Thiamine mononitrate Folic acid Phylloquinone Biotin Vitamin D3 Vitamin B12 Enzyme Trypsin Amino acids Taurine L-Carnitine (a combination of two different amino acids) Nucleotides Cytidine 5-monophosphate Disodium uridine 5-monophosphate Adenosine 5-monophosphate Disodium guanosine 5-monophosphate Soy Lecithin Developed as a student project for the Breastfeeding Course for Health Care Providers, Douglas College, New Westminster, BC, Canada - © 2007 by Cecily Heslett, Sherri Hedberg and Haley Rumble.

3 0

i know people get thier panties in a bind over this feeding debate but its crazy, ive know one breastfeeding mother feed her child for over a year and that child has eczema, asthma, hyperactivity, and tons of food allergies, that was her 3rd child, and yet her first two kids where bottle fed and have no health issue. Im not saying breastfeeding will cause those types of issues but what i am saying sometimes even with breastmilk your child care have issues.its not the bulletproof cape people seem to make it out to be. I personally do think breastmilk is best but thats my opinion and im entitled to it just like everyone else is, but please remember that, its YOUR OPINION. not everyone has to agree with you. lets be honest here, sure science says breast milk is best and they very well may be right, but science seems to change their minds an awful damn lot! How many times has the ama change their stand on circumcision? I feel each person should do whats they feel is best for themselves and baby,with in reason of course, and have lots of happy mamas and babies and less witch hunts over what you do with your boobs. And i do breast feed, just tired of people getting nasty over this.

294 0

why does it seem that women are taking the road less traveled or the easy way out ?????? life seems to be that way and im not saying you all made the wrong choice i saying most of you are saying it was just convenient or nice that your man can get up to help when most men work all day they dont want to take a 3 am feeding lol you the mom and issues like rape/ baby in hospital nicu /ect is a reasonable excuse NOT to breast feed ....my baby is in the nicu i still go when i can to breast feed and i pump and i have a older son and ect i go out of my way to do for my baby its not all about what the mm wants and the daddy can help you just pump some put it in a bottle and wow your man can feed not had lol

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2,096 19

With my first child, I initially didn't want to breastfeed. I was raped a few years prior and had a scar left on my breast from the incident, so I just hated them, hated the look of them, just was uncomfortable with my breasts in general. But when I got pregnant in 2007, my husband really wanted me to try breastfeeding. While he understood why I was uncomfortable doing it, he was still very for trying at least. So to please him, I tried breastfeeding. Unfortunately I was miserable... not only was I uncomfortable all the time, but my daughter had latch issues. I also experienced post-partum depression, so I got to a point 3 weeks after she was born that I wasn't going to bother anymore, and switched to formula (we'd been supplementing along with trying to breastfeed, but because of my PPD I wasn't eating so I didn't produce a lot of breastmilk). It was the best decision I made. I went on medication for the PPD and actually enjoyed my child. And now, I'm in a better place mentally, and am able to exclusively breastfeed my new baby. But I don't regret formula-feeding my first. She is and has always been a very healthy girl, has only been sick a couple times in her 4 years.

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6 49

Some women find it therapeutic to breastfeed when they have endured such a horrible thing as rape. I'm sorry that that wasn't the case for you. I am glad that you were able to find a way to enjoy your baby after getting help for your PPD.

6 10

Joanna, I just wanted to reach out to you and tell you I admire your resilience. I'm so glad you are in a great place now, and thank you for sharing your story. I'm also glad you are able to EBF your new child. What a long way you've come. Your children will learn from your strength, you are an inspiration. ♥

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0 0

I breastfed my son for two weeks before making the decision to stop. Why? Because I simply did not want to do it. I was miserable, which in turn was making my little man miserable. So we switched and I am now the proud mother of a happy, healthy, funny little boy who just happens to be formula fed.
And to any boobie nazi who is now poised to judge the decision of a total stranger, I say this: I am an intelligent woman, well aware of the pros and cons of both breast milk and formula (I would not make a decision about my sons welfare without doing thorough research), I am perfectly able to bond with my baby over the top of a bottle (and in the bath, in my arms, through play and generally any other way in which we spend time together) and, whether you agree or not, for many thousands of women and their families, breast is not best. What's so sad is that this choice is often so harshly criticised by those best placed to support mothers through the ups and downs of motherhood - other mothers.

13
25 16

Well said, Ally. Entire generations were raised on formula and survived and thrived. Woman were made to breastfeed, but it doesn't work well for everyone. When my mom had her second child she also provided breast milk for a set of twins who's mother couldn't nurse, and that was 64 years ago!

51 1

The History of Bottle Feeding February 25, 2008 Archaeological findings have shown that breast feeding substitutes were used thousands of years ago. Historically, substitute milk was given to infants whose mothers died or were too sick to feed their babies, usually with limited possibility of wet nursing at hand. Cow’s milk or goat’s milk were commonly used to replace mother’s milk. In addition, babies were sometimes given supplementary solid food, such as a paste made of bread or flour mixed with milk or water. Needless to say that infant mortality rate was extremely high – from 50 to 99% . History and cross-cultural studies have revealed that the increase in bottle feeding resulted in an increase in infant deaths, especially where standards of hygiene were not met. It is a fact, that artificial infant feeding can hold more risks for baby. During the industrial revolution artificial feeding became popular in Britain as women had to leave their children behind to work in the factories. The first scientific breast milk substitute was invented in 1867 by a German chemist. It was a combination of cow’s milk, flour, potassium bicarbonate and malt. However, the popularity of bottle feeding increased when condensed milk was developed in the late 19th century. The social consensus about how best to feed baby in a modern world which was filled with new scientific achievements, changed towards artificial infant feeding. Bottle feeding was sold as nutritious, safe and easy to prepare with no need for refrigeration. More importantly, pasteurization of milk and sterilization of feeding equipment made artificial infant feeding a safer alternative; thus, making bottle feeding more popular. In addition, medical representatives and scientists celebrated this new supposedly convenient way of feeding baby. As a result, breast feeding became comparatively unpopular as figures show that only 20 to 30% of babies were actually breastfed during WWII in the USA. However, the 1980s proved difficult for companies such as Nestlé when their involvement with medical establishments in order to sell formula feeding in the third world was revealed. Bottle feeding is still the number one choice for many new mothers. This can have different personal or even medical reasons, although modern living standards are mainly to blame for the change in maternal attitude over the past century.

5 0

When my mom had her kids in the late 60's/70's, she would have to kind of be sneaky about breast feeding and didn't give her babies the bottles of formula they were insisting she give us. The medical definitely made brestfeeding hard back then.

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1 16

I completely agree with you, Amanda. My boys are now in their 30's. At the time I made the decision NOT to breastfeed my babies, breastfeeding was just becoming extremely popular. It was extremely frowned upon to bottle feed. Breastfeeding was never a consideration for me. It was completely out of my comfort zone for some reason. I can honestly say that I do not have one single regret. No one can ever say that I didnt connect or bond with my baby. My babies were and still are momma's boys. My boys slept all night through from the time they were 2 weeks old. You always knew how much formula they got and that they had a full tummy. My husband was able to love and nurture the babies while bottle feeding them....something he would not have been able to participate in if I had breast fed. I remember how much it meant to my parents--to be able to hold and feed the boys their bottles. They were healthy and smart and incredibly loving and happy. Bottle feeding my babies---in no way--- had a negative effect on them. They were strong, honored and awarded athletes. They both were scholasticly gifted. They went on to college to get their masters degrees. One is in an impressive position in the financial world and the other is a high school principal. I couldnt be prouder of them......and I couldnt be closer to them. I dont want to hear one more person tell me how much I missed by not breastfeeding!

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0 1

Amen Debbie! Every woman needs to decide what is best for her baby, herself and her family. Breast feeding or bottle feeding is not an indicator of the depth or breadth of connectivity you have with your baby. Life is too short to criticize the choices of others. Give support. Thank you again Debbie! Congrats on raising two amazing men. I hope to do the same with my (bottle fed) girls.

19 0

amen, bottlefeeding is great!!

0 2

I agree that it is a choice a mother gets to make whether to breastfeed or not. There is one misconception though that I have read in several posts now that I would like to dispel. Fathers can feed their babies even when mom breast feeds. My daughter-in-law pumped so she could have extra on hand as well as for my son to be able to participate in the beauty of feeding a baby. I just wanted to clarify that dads don't have to miss out when mom chooses to breastfeed.

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0 0

As a breastfeeding mom I would like to say this:

I respect choice, *informed* choice. I totally see why someone who was raped does not want to breastfeed, or gives up after trying. I *get* that if you have severe complications and not a lot of support you give up. This does NOT make you a worse mom. As a matter of fact, I don't even think you're a bad mom if you try it and decide it's *just* not your thing. It IS a hard decision to make to stop nursing a young infant - I get that.

but what really bugs me is that I read a lot of stories here from moms who did not get get good information and good support and decide that there was no other way than to switch to formula.

and so this one is for the expecting, curious young mothers-to-be that come check out this topic:

get informed, go to an LLL-meeting, call them.

http://www.llli.org/

for those who have happily switched: enjoy your motherhood!

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0 16

Nicely said :)

0 0

EXACTLY!!! The incorrect information is startling! I do have to say that no matter why you choose not to breastfeed is nobody else's business, do what works for you and your family.

294 0

wic has classes that help you with it and if your low income they will pay for them they want you to breast feed the one i go to in northern idaho dose not push it at all they tell you that you have a choice and they can help you with what ever that is also if your low income they can help you while your prego get food and milk and after they can help you with formula and ect so many people say that they don't have the help they need will look into it ,, also the place im going the hospital they offer classes on breast feeding to and after the baby is born all you have to do is ask for help

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13,264 21

Because I was unable to provide enough nutrients for my children to thrive. I would have been nursing constantly, and still been behind.

I would like to say, that I am constantly annoyed by people who look down on me because I didn't breastfeed. I thought that parenting was providing for your children, in the best manner possible. Breastfeeding advocates don't seem to realize that some women simply cannot produce enough healthy, nutritious milk!

I would like to add that both of my sons were also lactose intolerant, which is NOT a good thing when the only feeding you are doing is breast. So, my sons, now 14 and 17, are healthy, well adjusted young men. They don't have any issues that stem from not breastfeeding.

Sometimes, it's just not the right thing to do.

10
432 14

I am not trying to criticize you, just wondering about the lactose intolerance... was that diagnosed when they were babies? because in fact 75% of the world population is lactose intolerant, but it typically only occurs after weaning age (with very very rare exceptions). if a baby is lactose intolerant they also can't have cow's or goat's milk based formula.

13,264 21

Gee, Lydia, I never take my kids to the doctor. I diagnose everything on my own, and I "decided" that they were lactose intolerant because I was too lazy to breastfeed. Of course they were diagnosed by a pediatrician, and a gastro specialist! What a question to ask someone, and a great example of women who will ask any question that they feel appropriate (whether it actually is or not) to a mother who isn't breastfeeding.

6 10

Actually, Shawnn, she asked WHEN they were diagnosed, not by whome. Also, I'm assuming she means did your pediatrician and gastro diagnosed your children as casein intolerant, not lactose. Lactose intolerance in infants is extremely rare, while casein is actually pretty common. You didnt have to be so rude.

13,264 21

Liz, when asked a personal question by someone whom I have never met, and I consider the question entirely inappropriate due to the content (personal information), I will answer as I see fit. And I don't see how it's anyone's business when my children were diagnosed, especially when it is quite obvious that it was when they were babies! After all, the breastfeeding question is moot when they're older than babies! These are the types of questions and comments that mothers (who, for whatever reason, chose not to bf) are upset by. They presume that we, as mothers, are incapable of either A)deciphering what we are told by physicians, B)are just to damned lazy to do it, or C) tried, but didn't get enough support. My making these silent assumptions, and then asking forward questions, you and others are being rude as well. SO...since I obviously wouldn't feed a child for a few years, and deal with intestinal problems the entire time, and wait to take them to a physician until they are toddlers, of course they were babies.

0 6

The part that is rude is for a total stranger to judge another for their choice/ability to feed their child.

0 14

Shawn I too didnt breastfeed my son as he was diagnosed lactose intolerant as a v young baby.The nasty snide comments were awful.It doesnt make us less of a mother for formula feeding.I found the questions you have been asked v rude too

0 13

If a baby is lactose intolerant, it doesn't mean they can't breast feed. Our bodies are designed to digest human milk, not cow's milk. We are the only species that regularly consumes milk from another animal, and the only species that consumes any milk after weaning. If there are issues with lactose, the mother needs to make sure she doesn't consume dairy products while breast feeding. Please don't think I'm judging, as I had my own reasons for not breast feeding, I just don't want people to be confused about that one issue. My son is 9 and healthy and intelligent, even though he was on (soy) formula.

0 27

Actually Michelle all mammals produce Lactose in their milk and human milk is one of the highest. It doesn't matter if the mother consumes milk or not her body will still produce Lactose. All three of my babies were lactose intolerant, yes it was diagnosed by a specialist who also told me that it is considered rare only because testing for it is almost impossible without giving a child a colonoscopy which naturally most health professionals and parents are reluctant to do. It is this sort of misinformation that you are regurgitating that makes mothers like myself and Shawnn so angry. If you don't know please don't try to give advice to others!

0 0

I don't think you were being rude, Shawnn. I couldn't breastfeed either, which was a good thing because my son had a dairy allergy. We switched to soy and it was much better. I too have a milk allergy which I found out after, as well as intollerance. I get tired of people telling me also that I am incorrect and there's no way my son could be allergic or intollerant. He could be both for all doctors know. He was having horrible bowel problems which is intollerance. It was missed and we switched after pressing the issue the horrible pediatrician. Good for you for taking them to a gastro, which is eventually the rode we took.

0 14

My son was diagnosed with lactose intolerance and gerd around 4 months old. His Dr. recommended nutramigen which is very expensive and spells very bad but it was the only thing that my son was able to digest and hold down. It is not impossible to have a baby that is lactose intolerant.

8 0

Ladies-lactose isn't the sugar in breastmilk, so if your child is lactose intolerant all it would mean is the mom would need to avoid it. C'mon now-you could do better then that!!!!!

0 3

I have a friend who breastfed for 18 months and her son is lactose intolerant. I guess it's different for every mom and child! She actually pumped extra so that he would have breast milk for cereal after she stopped nursing.

0 27

Jessica, see my previous comment. ALL mammal milks have Lactose in them, INCLUDING human milk which is actually one of the highest in Lactose, regardless if the mother drinks it or not. Maybe you should do some research before criticizing other people!

3 0

Lactose intolerance and the breastfed baby By Joy Anderson BSc(Nutrition), PostgradDipDiet, APD, IBCLC, ABA Breastfeeding Counsellor Lactose intolerance is poorly understood in the Australian community. There are lots of myths and misunderstandings about it, especially when it comes to babies. Contrary to what you may hear: There will not be less lactose in the breastmilk if the mother stops eating dairy products. There is no relationship between lactose intolerance in adult family members, including in the mother, and in babies. They are different types of lactose intolerance. A baby with symptoms of lactose intolerance should not be taken off the breast and fed on soy-based or special lactose-free infant formula. Lactose intolerance is very different to intolerance or allergy to cows' milk protein. Lactose is the sugar in all mammalian milks. It is produced in the breast. The amount of lactose in breastmilk is independent of the mother's consumption of lactose and hardly varies. The milk the baby gets when he first starts to feed contains much the same amount of lactose as does the milk at the end of a breastfeed. However, the milk at the end does contain more fat. Lactase is the enzyme that is required to digest lactose. Lactose intolerance occurs when a person does not produce this enzyme, or does not produce enough of it, and is therefore unable to digest lactose. If it is not digested and broken down, it cannot be absorbed. If this happens, the lactose continues on in the digestive tract until it gets to the large bowel. It is here that bacteria break it down to make acids and gases. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are liquid, sometimes green, frothy stools and an irritable baby who may pass wind often. If a baby is lactose intolerant, the medical tests ('hydrogen breath test' and tests for 'reducing sugars' in the stools) would be expected to be positive. However they are also positive in most normal breastfed babies under 3 months. Their use in diagnosing lactose intolerance in young babies is therefore open to question. Lactose intolerance in babies Primary (or true) lactose intolerance This extremely rare genetic condition is incompatible with normal life unless there is medical intervention. A truly lactose-intolerant baby would fail to thrive from birth (ie not even start to gain weight) and show obvious symptoms of malabsorption and dehydration. This is a medical emergency and the baby would need a special diet from soon after birth. Secondary lactose intolerance Because the enzyme lactase is produced in the very tips of the microscopic folds of the intestine, anything that damages the gut lining can cause secondary lactose intolerance. Even subtle damage to the gut may wipe off these tips and reduce the enzyme production, for example: Gastroenteritis. Food intolerance or allergy. In breastfed babies, this can come from food proteins, such as in cows' milk, wheat, soy or egg, or possibly other food chemicals that enter breastmilk from the mother's diet, as well as from food the baby has eaten. Parasitic infection such as giardiasis or cryptosporidiosis. Coeliac disease (intolerance to the gluten in wheat and some other grain products). Following bowel surgery. Food allergies and food intolerances can cause a baby to be unsettled. The foods to which a baby is allergic or intolerant can pass from through the mother's breastmilk. In some cases, removal from the mother's diet of the foods to which the baby is allergic or intolerant, for example cows' milk products, can sometimes help. If you wish to try eliminating foods from your diet on the suspicion that your baby has an allergy or an intolerance, check with a dietitian to help you identify the culprit foods and to make sure your diet is nutritionally adequate for both your and your baby. Cows' milk protein allergy (or intolerance) is often confused with lactose intolerance and many people think they are the same thing. This is not the case. The confusion probably arises because cows' milk protein and lactose are both in the same food, ie dairy products. Since allergy or intolerance to a food protein can cause secondary lactose intolerance, they may be present together, further adding to this confusion. Secondary lactose intolerance is temporary, as long as the gut damage can heal. When the cause of the damage to the gut is removed, for example by taking the food to which a breastfed baby is allergic out of the mother's diet, the gut will heal, even if the baby is still fed breastmilk. If your doctor does diagnose 'lactose intolerance', continuing to breastfeed will not harm your baby as long as she is otherwise well and growing normally. While the baby has symptoms of lactose intolerance, it is sometimes suggested that the mother alternate breastfeeding the baby with feeds of lactose-free artificial baby milk or even take the baby off the breast. Authorities only recommend the use of lactose-free artificial baby milk if the baby is artificially-fed and is very malnourished and/or losing weight. However, human milk remains the best food and will assist with gut healing. In addition, sensitivity of the baby to foreign protein (cow or soy) should be considered before introduction of any artificial baby milk, as regular types, including lactose-free ones, may make this problem worse. You should seek professional advice on the need for hypoallergenic artificial baby milk. A medical adviser should see any baby with long-term symptoms and/or who is failing to thrive. Before even partially taking a baby off the breast for a short time, thought should be given to other aspects of the breastfeeding relationship. Questions you could ask include: How will alternative feeding methods affect my baby? Could bottle-feeding other milk products result in breast refusal later? How easily will I be able to express my milk to maintain my supply? Average recovery time for the gut of a baby with severe gastroenteritis is 4 weeks, but may be up to 8 weeks for a baby under 3 months. For older babies, over about 18 months, recovery may be as rapid as 1 week. If a medical adviser orders alternative feeds for the baby, it is important that the mother understands that her breastmilk is still the normal and proper food for her baby in the long term. You may have heard about giving drops containing the enzyme lactase to babies who have symptoms of lactose intolerance. There is little evidence that these are of much value when used this way, although there are anecdotal reports that relatively large doses may help in some cases. Lactase drops are designed to be put into expressed breastmilk (or other milk) and left overnight for the enzyme to predigest the lactose in the milk. In practice they seem to be occasionally useful for babies. Lactose intolerance in adults Lactase enzyme levels normally change over a person's life span. They rise rapidly in the first week after birth, start to fall from about 3-5 years of age and fall sharply in later childhood. Low levels of lactose in colostrum match the low levels of the enzyme present in the first week of life. Cows' milk is commonly consumed by adults in some populations, but mostly by people of northern European descent. In about 70% of the people of the world, and in over 10% of Australians, levels of this enzyme fall so low in adulthood that they become lactose intolerant. The tendency to adult lactose intolerance is genetically determined. Some races, such as Asian, African, Australian Aboriginal and Hispanic populations are more likely to be lactose intolerant as adults. Caucasians are more likely to be able to consume milk as adults because they tend to continue producing the enzyme lactase throughout life. Even so, the levels do fall with age. People who have been able to drink milk as adults may find they become lactose intolerant when elderly. An adult who has very low levels of the enzyme can usually tolerate some lactose because normal bacteria living in the gut provide a limited capacity to break it down. However, the person may find it gives them loose stools and 'wind'. Human babies of all races can tolerate lactose. In fact human milk has a very high concentration of lactose compared to cows' milk and that of other mammals. This is thought to be related to a human baby's rapid brain growth in infancy, compared to other mammals. Removing lactose from any baby's diet for more than a short period should not be done lightly and then only under medical supervision. Lactose overload in babies Lactose overload can mimic lactose intolerance and is frequently mistaken for it. An overload is often seen in babies consuming large amounts of breastmilk, that is when their mothers have an oversupply. This may result in an unsettled baby with adequate to large weight gains. The baby usually passes urine more than 10 times a day and has many (often explosive) bowel motions in 24 hours. They may have green, frothy poos that resemble those of a baby with lactose intolerance. This usually occurs in babies under 3 months old. Ironically, a mother may thinkthat she has a low milk supply because her baby always seems to be hungry. The nappies can be the biggest clue to what's happening. What comes out the bottom must have gone in the top! There is a vicious cycle here. A large-volume, low-fat feed goes through the baby so quickly that not all the lactose is digested (more fat would help slow it down). The lactose reaching the lower bowel draws extra water into the bowel and is fermented by the bacteria there, producing gas and acid stools. The acid stools often cause a nappy rash. Gas and fluid build-up cause tummy pain and the baby 'acts hungry' (wants to suck, is unsettled, draws up his legs, screams). Sucking is the best comfort he knows and also helps move the gas along the bowel. This tends to ease the pain temporarily and may result in wind and stool being passed. Since the baby indicates that he wants to suck at the breast, his mother, logically, feeds him again. Sometimes it is the only way to comfort him. Unfortunately another large feed on top of the earlier one hurries the system further and results in more gas and fluid accumulation. The milk seems almost literally to 'go in one end and out the other'. Many mothers whose babies have had this problem have found it helpful to change from an 'on-demand' breastfeeding routine. This is usually only necessary for a short time. The aim is to slow the rate at which milk goes through the baby by feeding one breast per feed, or by 'block-feeding'. To block-feed, set a 4-hour time period (this may be adjusted according to the severity of the oversupply) and every time the baby wants to feed during this period, use the same breast. Then use the other breast for the next 4 hours, etc. Each time the baby returns to the already used breast, he gets a lower-volume, higher-fat feed that helps slow the system down. While block-feeding, check that the unused breast does not get overfull. When the baby's symptoms are relieved, the mother is able to go back to a normal breastfeeding routine and feed according to need. Where the problem is severe and/or long-lasting, it is worth trying to work out why there is an oversupply of breastmilk. Is the mother timing feeds and switching sides after a set number of minutes? Has something caused the baby to be unusually unsettled, resulting in frequent comfort sucking and an oversupply? Is secondary lactose intolerance adding to the overload situation? Sometimes a mother who is worried about having a low supply overcompensates by offering more feeds than the baby needs and overstimulates her supply. Perhaps the baby has been unwell, or is suffering discomfort from a difficult birth, and seeks comfort in more frequent feeds than he needs to satisfy hunger. Some mothers just have a tendency to oversupply - there is a normal variation in this as in everything else about our bodies. In days gone by, these may have been the mothers who could have made a living as wet nurses! Specific ways to help with each of these is beyond the scope of this article. However, individual situations can be discussed with an Australian Breastfeeding Association counsellor, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), a dietitian with an interest in infant feeding or other health professional. The Association's booklet Too Much has tips for helping oversupply problems. Why Is My Baby Crying? has lots of suggestions for soothing unsettled babies. As explained above, there are several types of lactose intolerance, but it is very rare for a baby to have to stop breastfeeding because of this condition. Except for the extremely rare primary type, there is always a cause behind lactose intolerance in babies. Getting to the cause and fixing that is the key to resolving the baby's symptoms. References Brodribb W (ed), 2004, Breastfeeding Management. 3rd edn. Australian Breastfeeding Association, Melbourne. Heyman MB for the Committee on Nutrition, 2006, Lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics 118(3): 1279-1286 (Available at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/118/3/1279) Lawlor-Smith C & Lawlor-Smith L, 1998, Lactose intolerance. Breastfeeding Review 6(1): 29-30. Leeson R, 1995, Lactose intolerance: What does it mean? ALCA News 6(1): 24-25, 27. Minchin M, 1986, Food for Thought. 2nd edn. Unwin Paperbacks, Sydney. Rings EHHM et al, 1994, Lactose intolerance and lactase deficiency in children. Current Opinion in Pediatrics 6: 562-567. Royal Australian College of Physicians 2006, Paediatric policy: Soy protein formula. RACP, Sydney. Saarela T, Kokkonen J & Koivisto M, 2005, Macronutrient and energy contents of human milk fractions during the first six months of lactation. Acta Paediatrica 94: 1176-1181. Woolridge M, Fisher C 1988, Colic, 'overfeeding' and symptoms of lactose malabsorption in the breast-fed baby: a possible artifact of feed management? Lancet (ii): 382-384. Breastfeeding Info Topics: Common concerns – baby Special situationsAdd a comment

56 5

I, too, was wondering if it was a caesin allergy or actual lactose intolerance, too! One of the things that I've found now, later on in life after taking a 6-8 month break from most dairy products because of my fiance's caesin allergy, (the protein in milk,) is Kefir, which will help people with lactose intolerance realign their stomachs with the good bacteria needed to digest caesin. Your kids are older now, but maybe you'd be interested in looking into it, if you haven't heard of it before. If you have, then my apologies for taking your time.

56 5

Uh... hello? Eating less lactose as a mother *DOES NOT* lessen the amount of lactose in breast milk, that's freaking ridiculous. Like someone else mentioned, human breast milk is one of the highest lactose milks around. It's a myth that if the mother eats less dairy there will be less lactose in her breast milk.

4 0

Being lactose intolerant has nothing to do with being unable to drink (human)breastmilk The beauty of breastmilk you have the perfect amount of nutrients in your breastmilk - the first part is thinner -- helps for attending on thirst for baby the latter or back part more thicker has mostly the feeding need -- Breastfeeding is a mind thing -- Having a baby is a choice you make - a life changing choice -- to be still part of the party life and being in conversations in not part of mother role anymore -- The hard work is on ! A good supporting husband is a great help - and mothers involve Dad, The reward of breast feeding is to be found in years to come --

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12 9

I really wanted to breastfeed my son, friends and family, drs and my midwife all told me "it was the best thing for him" and I got really really upset when I couldnt get him latched on properly. Lactation experts tried to help he get him on properly but nothing worked for me, it was so painful so I brought a breast pump and bottlefed him breast milk for a few days and that was fantastic... but I couldnt pump enough to keep up with my boy, so I thought he needs to eat so formula it is. Hes still a healthy happy little boy. and I dont feel guilty any more : )

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0 0

Why is this such a big issue for so many women? If you do breast feed, great, if you don't, that's fine too. People need to mind their own business. This is coming from someone who didn't breast feed their first child and breast fed for 13 months their second child. This issue has jumped shark in my opinion.

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Well, truth be told, it DOES effect us all. Formula manufacturing, bottle disposing is just an additional problem to add to our environment and us who work and pay taxes also pay for the healthcare of children and people on Medicaid. Many current statisitcs about the enormous amount of money that would be saved , as a nation and the world, if more women breastfed. Not just in infancy either. Studies show how organs like the kidneys can't properly digest something made for baby cows, because they are baby humans, which leads to things like kidney failure later in life,and dialysis. It is a global issue, as well as personal.

294 0

Jessica r you saying that if i didn't breast feed my son that he can have all the problems you listed??? well if so your wrong i breast feed my son until he was 4months and he had problems with digesting and he was constipated a lot and when he was 14 days old he got sick with a 7 day flu that i caught to (wait i was breast feed to) and my son 9 years old to this day has trouble with being able to poop ,, and ect ,, i think its great if you CAN breast feed but i don't think that it helps keep your baby healthier in that way my son became lactose intolrent after breast feeding for 8 months so how did breast feeding help my son and even then he was sick a lot so that blows you away

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Just another bit of info- my breastfed daughter has severe eczema and food allergies. It requires expensive medicine and a special diet to control her symptoms. On the other hand, my formula fed son has very mild eczema and no food allergies. His eczema only requires Cetaphil lotion to be applied after he bathes.

56 5

Uh, no offense, Jessica, but the amount of *crap* I had to buy to try to get my milk to come in and continue to breastfeed my child was every bit as much AND more than if I'd originally just bottle fed her. First, breast feeding mothers *do* need to buy bottles. For storing extra milk, (what, I'm just going to throw away that extra milk I pumped out to up production?,) so that the baby's father can help with feedings, (breastfed babies take longer, (generally speaking,) to sleep through the night... why is it the mother's SOLE responsibility to feed their child?,) the breast pump, the breast pads ... (ew, leakage!, okay... maybe you have to buy these irregardless if you're breastfeeding, I dunno, I've only had one child,) the boob creams to try to help with mastitis... (oh my god, mastitis sucks!) Formula canisters are recyclable as are almost all baby bottles. However, I don't know if the rubber nipples are, so that is true, but nonetheless, these are things you'll have to buy or be given from a baby shower anyways. No one said, hey!, let's give the baby cow's milk. That's ridiculous! Cow's milk *is* for baby cows. Formula does not equal milk from the udder of a cow there is a lot of processing that goes on there, including the addition of vegetable fats. And to all of you that claim babies who aren't fed breast milk have a higher risk of infant mortality? "In particular, the use of infant formula in less economically developed countries is linked to poorer health outcomes because of the prevalence of unsanitary preparation conditions, including lack of clean water and lack of sanitizing equipment." --- (from Wiki,) Those of us in developed countries don't really have to worry about that, now do we? I think the links between infant immunity (from their mother,) and breastfeeding are slightly over-hyped. I'm not going to be so arrogant as to say, hey, the don't exist, but man, if your child is failing to thrive, if you're not producing enough milk for your child, for the love of God and your infant, make the switch to infant formula & don't allow anyone to make you feel bad about it! Quite honestly, why you don't breastfeed is NO one's business, nobody has the right to make you feel like "less of a mother."

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3 15

It is unbelievable to me how many women feel the need to lecture others about breastfeeding. I breastfed my daughter for her first five months through extreme pain due to fungal infections in the nipples. Meds did not work and I also produced way less milk than she needed to thrive. She was underweight and I was miserable. I had support,a pump and a lot of women telling me to "just keep trying". Thank goodness I had a great pediatrician who was supportive in my choice to switch to formula. My daughter (now 6) is smart, amazing and we are very close. It is just such a disappointment to me when women fail to support and instead judge one another for choices that are personal in nature. We are all moms, and we all love our kids.

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I had a completely miserable child for three months. We figured out that he was lactose intolerant, and switched from boob to soy formula. He was like a completely different baby immediately.

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Did you try to change your diet before you gave up breastfeeding?

53 26

good for you! At the end of the day a happy baby is all that matters!

3 31

I did try to change my diet. I tried eliminating foods for three months with my first child, nothing worked until we switched to formula. With my second child I saw the same thing happening and switched after a month. I didn't want her suffering like my son had to.

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Was it lactose intolerance or a dairy allergy? Lactose intolerance has to be diagnosed by lots of tests and is often confused for dairy allergies. I'm gld soy worked for you.

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Why do people always feel the need to ask that question? The mothers diet actually has less impact than most people think. ALL mammals produce lactose, and being mammals that includes humans. Actually human milk is one of the highest because it is needed to support the development of our larger brain. Dairy cows don't drink milk but they still produce lactose in their milk. Mothers who chose not to breastfeed normally don't do so without putting a lot of effort and thought into it. Besides what is the point of the question? She can't go back in time and change what she did, the only result of that question is you make her feel worse because she didn't think of trying that, or you get told what she has no doubt had to tell many many other people that yes she did try that, either way it will only make the person being asked feel worse.

3 0

Both of my boys were breastfed. The younger one acted like nursing was torture. Pumped & put it in a bottle, same reaction. Desperate, I tried soy formula, then another one that was pricy & made him smell bad. Alluentum? Sp? This poor baby was getting thin and looked horrible. desperate, I went to La Lache League meetings and they told me MY DIET should have little affect on the baby. Finally the doctor said at 4&1/2 months old he was too old for colic. He was put on Zantac and within 2 days, he was nursing with no problems. He was like a new baby, happy and gaining weight. I nursed till he was 13 months because he didn't sleep through the night and I was not getting up to make a bottle. He is also the one that catches everything and his older brother who was only nursed for 5 months because he was a biter, is seldom sick. I don't think nursing provides lifetime immunities but they were very healthy infants & toddlers. If your heart is in it, never give up. Both boys had milk intolerance but NOT lactose intolerant. Just couldn't keep formula down. Breast milk is designed for humans so there is very little chance a baby can't drink it. I'm so happy I stuck it out. Saved us a pile of money too. I also have the attitude that if breast feeding bothers you, look the other way. My kids got fed when & where they were hungry.

294 0

my son became that way when i stopped breast feeding at 4 months i had problems produsing milk he started formula and started get sick like right after he would eat i thought he was just sick so i just kept it up like the doc said 4 days later he still was sick throwing up had bowel problems ect went to the doc they said he might be lactose IN, and we tryed it for 3 days and after the 3rd feeding he stoped that all but so at 11 1/2 months i gave him some milk and he didn't get sick and to this day he is ok with it and he is 9 years old

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460 66

My first child I breastfed for 6 weeks, he fed every hour for an hour day and night from the time my milk came in, he grew very quickly and by that 6 week mark I was so sore and exhausted that I gave up and introduced formula, he had one bottle and slept for 4 hours straight, that made up my mind to continue with formula. With my 2nd child, I again tried breastfeeding, but I retained my placenta and needed blood transfusions and that made an impact on my supply, after 3 weeks of constantly feeding, I expressed for 24hrs and only got 50mls, I switched to formula. With my 3rd I had Placenta Incretta which was found after I gave birth, long story short, I had an emergency hystorectomy, a 9Unit blood transfusion + multiple other fluids, I was in ICU for 4 1/2 days (the hospital didn't know if I was going to survive) and as hard as I tried to breastfeed, it just didn't happen, I supplement fed untill 8 weeks which was when my milk completely dried up on it's own.
Breastfeeding is not for everyone, some of my friends loved it and some hated it, I think you need to do what is best for both you and bub, if you are miserable breastfeeding, your baby will pick up on that. Each to their own and I don't think iit is anyones place to make someone feel guilty for making such a descision (breastfed or formula). I still had women (always women) say to me that 'it's a shame you didn't keep breastfeeding' after everything I went through to live to be with my daughter, if only people knew how heartbreaking it is for mums when negative comments are made about whatever we choose to do with our children. I think if mum and bub are happy and healthy then people should be happy.... Just my thoughts any how :-)

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0 0

My mother had the same experience that you had with #3 with me (placenta issues, blood transfusions, an emergency hysterectomy). She wasn't able to nurse my older brother because of bleeding issues... and the medicine she took to stop hemmoraging. I feel very lucky to have my mother with me, she had to be revived. However she has felt very guilty about not being able to nurse... When I delivered my first born with minimal complications and was able to nurse, successfully, for a year, and then 14 months with my next child... she thankfully let go of a good chunk of her guilt. Just thought I'd let you know from a daughters point of view. I love my mom and I wish she hadn't held on to that guilt and stress. ♥

5 0

I also had placenta increta, emergency hysterectomy, resuscitation, blood transfusions & ICU as well as my daughter being premature & also needing reviving,NICU & transfusions. After a rough start for both of us we enjoyed breast feeding for 2 years. Having a rough delivery doesn't always mean you won't be able to breastfeed. I'm not saying this to pick on those of you that didn't end up being able to breasted, just to let others that may read this that it is possible to breast feed after a particularly complicated delivery.

460 66

Thanks Michelle, it is nice to hear it from a daughters point of view, my emergency baby is now 2 1/2yrs old and after a lot of soul searching (and lots of support from family and professionals) I am now almost completely at peace with what I went through! I did the best I could under the circumstances, I was on pain meds, antibiotics and blod pressure meds when I left hospital and breastfeeding just didn't work for me! Helen, that's fantastic that you were able to breastfeed for so long, I only wish that had of happened, I was devestated each time breastfeeding didnt work out for me, I posted my post just so people were aware that there are medical reasons for not breastfeeding!!

6 0

Helen, I don't want to be argumentative, but your comment is really disturbing. I don't think people realize how horrible it is to open up and tell a very intimate story only to be told by someone, "oh yeah. That happened to me too but I was successful! So there!" we are all very proud of you. But this was not the time to tell your story. It was a little insensitive.

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77 16

I've had 3 children and was not able to breast feed any of them. The oldest latched on the best and i tried for a month but she was not getting enough, so i tried to pump and feed. one hour spent nursing her and a second hour trying to pump, all to be repeated in another hour - i couldn't handle it. With the next 2 i tried, they were harder to get to latch but we eventually got it, I again would feed and then try to pump (to stimulate more production) but at the peak i would only produce 1oz between the two sides. My milk just never came in with any of them, and it made it hard for me (PPD with the first 2).

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Your comment sounds exactly like my experience with my son

0 13

Breast feeding improves maternal bonding and the breast milk has adequate nutrients for the baby and boosts the baby's immune system.. For convenience, mothers can express breast milk for the baby while breast feeding on the other breast. This method improves let down and reduces the time spent expressing. Then you can bottle feed conveniently when u are not at home. This I did for my 3 kids in their 1st 3months before introducing formular cos I had to go to work.

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36 0

I too was all about breast feeding until I actually tried it and reality hit me . Everything about it was awful and awkward for the both of us . She was having a really hard time latching and I had to wear one of those nipple shield things cause they would not keep their " shape " . Feeding was a lot more complicated then poping her under my shirt , step 1 , clean shield , step 2 , wet breast , step 3 attach shield , step 4 attach baby , step 5 stop when baby knocks shield off and repeat steps 1-4 again about 5 times a feeding . It was not till I started bottle feeding her full time that I felt the all mighty " bond " . She was relaxed I was relaxed , that to be was a beautiful thing . Not to mention the mastitis with a temp of 101 , fire hot boobs plus other flu like feelings . She is a year old now and i still feel guilty for giving up but I do know it was for the best.

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83 5

Yeah I went though the same with my first plus a painful & powerful let-down.We made it just over 5 months and then we switched. After all the pain I went though I felt like I put in the best effort I could and didn't look back. I have since successfully BF 2 more kids. No pain or latching problems the 2nd and 3rd times around and very rewarding.If you ever have another child try again cause every baby is different and some just "know" how to nurse.

3 26

It took me until Child Number Four to finally get it right! When I was in the hospital, the lactation specialist told me that nursing was a baby's exercise. I would see sweat appearing on my baby's face after feedings. The nurse told me that a baby would much rather have a bottle than a boob since it is so much easier to get milk out of a bottle. My first three children I would go back and forth between boob and bottle and they always wanted a bottle instead, being terrible fussy if I offered up nursing. The best advice I received from the lactation specialist about latching issues was to never ever give the baby a bottle so they wouldn't know what one was. When they were hungry, they knew where the food was coming from and they would eventually have to latch on! They also told me not to worry about the amount of milk during the first two weeks, it would come in when you and your baby were ready. I was so much more relaxed by Child No. 4!!! Don't give up!

3 0

I exclusively breast fed my first two with no problems. Of course as newborns they nursed every two hours for an hour but everything was fine. With my third I had to nurse for 40 minutes, then pump for 20 then give the baby whatever I pumped and then do it all again 40 minutes later. It was exhausting, but it only lasted like that for 8 weeks and then he got the hang of it. I was determined to breast feed. Don't give up, every baby is different. I was so disappointed because I felt like a pro and thought breastfeeding the third would be a breeze...as my lactation consultant told me, breast feeding is a 50/50 relationship and just because I was a pro doesn't mean my baby would be. Hang in there and seek support. My baby is 7 months old now and exclusively on breast milk. I have recurrent mastitis about every two weeks and my fever spikes to 104. I take garlic (raw) which helps as it is a natural antibiotic. I think it is a great thing when you know you have made the best decision for you and your baby. Don't feel guilty, a happy mama= a happy baby.

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0 0

I chose not to breastfeed because I was completely uncomfortable with the situation. I figured if I was not comfortable then my son would not be either.

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Crystal, I chose not to breastfeed for the very same reason. I got a lot of flak about it from other women, so I called a friend who is a pediatrician and she told me that it was totally okay to choose NOT to breastfeed. It was the best advice I ever received. I had 2 super-healthy boys with no allergies, no ear infections, etc. They are still rarely sick. I was a very happy mommy to them and my husband was able to participate in their babyhood fully. Women seem to fight so hard for the choice to breastfeed, but we also need to recognize the choice to bottle feed.

2 0

I didn't breastfeed my first child either. I was in extreme pain from an unexpected cesarean and it just didn't feel natural to me. I couldn't even get myself to make the attempt at breastfeeding and I had formula available. Formula was the immediate solution for me and it worked out just fine. Yet sometimes I wonder what it would have been like to breastfeed my first child..mother nature played a cruel mind trick on me.

2 0

I felt the same way. You are not alone. My son was not breastfed either. I couldn't get myself to do it. It didn't feel natural to me. I also had a hard time dealing with an unexpected cesarean. I felt unnatural and disconnected.

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0 10

I am on phenobarbital for a seizure disorder. Although my Dr. told me that it was possible to breast feed, I would then have to have the baby's blood drawn quite often to see how much meds were going into his system. In the end, it really didn't seem worth the worries. I bottle fed both my boys and they are quite healthy and happy.

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I did not breastfeed my son because he was born with a cleft lip and palate, so breastfeeding was impossible for him. He could not form a seal or make suction, so we had to use special bottles and squeeze them to get the milk in him. I did pump for a short time, but it just wasn't realistic. I think every bit of breastmilk a baby gets is beneficial, but when it turns you into a crazy momma it is not worth it! Ironically, my son who was on formula had fewer illnesses and ear infections than my first daughter who was fully breastfed. Kids are kids - all different, and we just do the best we can.

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I had a c-section that resulted in my being violently sick for the 24 hours after my daughter was born. I could not feed and could not pump. My milk was late (at best) because of the lack of hormones in my system to let my body know the little one was out of my belly! After the sickness was over, I tried, but she failed to thrive (medical term). We were forced in the hospital to supplement with formula. After going home, I pumped religiously for a month. We continued to try and breast feed (and supplement with formula). I was unable to get her to latch with success and after my freezer died spoiling my "store" of breast milk to keep the process going with the bottles, I gave up in exhuastion. If anyone is going to judge me - keep your comments to yourself.

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54 1

I didn't choose not to breastfeed, my kids couldn't latch on properly.

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0 0

I didn't breastfeed with my son for a couple of reasons, 1 I really wanted to go back on my acid reflux meds that I couldn't use while pregos and if anyonw has acid reflux it can be very painful and 2 I didn't want to be the only one feeding him, (it didn't make sense to me to spend time pumping then to spend the time feeding the pumped milk). It turned out really well and my husband enjoyed beable to feed my son at anytime. It helped alot with him getting up and doing nite feedings and my nieces, grandparents and friends also enjoyed feeding him. With that being said, funny enought my acid reflux settled down alot after having him and I'm thinking about doing both bottle and breast, but will stop breast if I'm finding my child is not taking to a bottle. Again it was very nice to have others take part especailly my hubby. But I don't think people should judge either way. Do it or don't do it. As long as whatever you have decided on works for you and your family and of course baby is healthy.

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0 0

I couldn't because my milk didn't kick in. There was insufficient for a hungry baby boy. I switch to formula as soon as I could. Now I also suffer from GORD due to a haitus hernia in my chest for which i have to take meds. I know the pain that severe acid reflux can cause. So i would have to bottlefeed again. From my first pregnancy, I decided a happy me will lead to a happy baby. If I am comfortable with my choices, it will lead to easier decision making about what is best for my baby. So there, to all those who judge me for my choices to be a better mother by taking care of myself in order to take care of son.

3 0

Katrina, my OB allowed me to take Pepcid after 3 months.I have gastritis & reflux.Pepcid can cause cleft palate. Once that is formed, no worries. I took it for the rest of my pregnancy and am still on it. My baby is 18 now. Maybe times have changed and they found it causes more problems, I really don't know. Just putting that out there for you if that was your only reason and you want more children.

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I am not saying one way or the other, I have used both BF and formula.

I will say this; educate, educate, EDUCATE yourselves ladies and choose what is best. I don't mean the baby books or grandma or even your Doctor or Midwife's word. READ medical journals with sources notated on this subjects.

By the number of quotes below, it would seem many babies are born with lactose intolerance. THIS IS VERY RARE. Lactose is NEEDED by babies for energy and growth! There is a kind of lactose intolerance that is only temporary - and it may deal with a bout of gastro. issues. AND TO CURE IT- YOU BF! :) It can be due to an "overdose" of lactose...but it is not suggested you switch to formula.

The benefits for both bf and formula have been argued and discussed, and it will continue to be so - until something "better" comes along. lol. Whichever you do, I would again stress that you educate yourselves and do either (both, whatever) the best you can.
Start by eating properly during pregnancy. Prepare yourself for the schedule changes, um LIFE changes that are coming!

If you use formula, be aware that not mixing properly can cause many health issues that can be blamed on other things. Check out ANY formula site on the matter. Clean hands, clean bottle, do not leave out, etc. It's not as "simple" as you might think it is. I found it EXHAUSTING!

If you BF - eat right! EDUCATE yourself on milk producing, nutrient giving foods. All mommies should be eating well-balanced meals and snack- but when you are the food source, treat yourself accordingly. Know what you need to make you "work" (HAHA) correctly.

Also, all new moms are tired. Remember this too shall pass, and it only feels like forever right now. Soon they'll be driving and you'll be willing to give anything to be nursing or holding that bottle again.

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Good advice, and how quickly that time passes. My babe turned 24 yesterday!!

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My first daughter breasted for almost 3 weeks before she went to formula she wasn't gaining any weight and was really bad jaundice ... My second daughter I was really pressured to breastfeed via pumping and latching as she was almost 8 weeks early and spent the first 2 weeks in the nicu ... If you ever thought you were pressured times it by 100...all the nurses pressured and pushed even tho it turns out she didn't like my breast milk... She'd only eat 1/4 of it and the rest had to be tube fed...which is very heart breaking to see your baby with a tube down her nose... So I continued to pump and feed and gabage the remainder... She was gaining so I finally took a stand and said WAIT I want her on formula only... So I heard the sinkers, got the looks but as she'd finish all 2oz of her bottle and her tube was removed I said I'm her only voice and by god if she wants formula let her have it.... I'm going to have our lil surprise in dec/jan and I will not even attempt to breastfeed and I will not allow anyone to make me feel quilty about it... Have to do what's right for both you and baby not what everyone else says.. My three year old doesn't get sick more than the breastfed and she surely ain't any less intelligent ... The baby I can't say much about as she's only 6 months old but she's doing good and thriving ... THANK GOD FOR FORMULA

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Yes!! Well said!

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I consider you lucky to have al lthat pressure. I had almost no encouragement at all. My daughter was 3 weeks early but quite tiny and underweight and spent a week in the NICU. The doctors were insistant that "breast is best" and the feeding plan was breastmilk with top up of formula as needed, but the nurses were never supportive and hardly gave me any time to feed and were always impatient to take her away from me and hook her up to the feeding tube with formula. One nurse wouldn't even et me try at all because she said I was tiring out the baby (she wouldnt even let me hold her while she was being tube fed as I usually did...I now wish I had reported her). I went home at nights because I was feeling run down and needed sleep, and the night nurses started bottle feeding her so she got too used to bottle nipples and the the faster, easier flow. I didn't get much help from the LC as she was hardly around (too busy with too many patients) and she never stuck around long enough when I got her and she wasn't very nice or helpful. Nobody told me about nipple shields (which would have really helped as mine were pretty flat and my daughter's mouth pretty small and she never latched properly) or that breast pump flanges came in different sizes (hospital just gave me the biggest size). So my baby never nursed enough and I hardly had a milk supply, pumping yeilded almost nothing. I eventually gave up and let them fully feed her formula just so she'd get off the feeding tube and home sooner. I would have killed for an experience like yours.

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I'd just like to say that it sure would be nice if everyone could get along and mind their own business when it comes to other people's children. We all do what we believe to be right and proper. I disagree with some of the comments on here but I feel no need to say so because I am no better or worse than them - they simply had a different experience than myself.

I formula fed my first child after 3 months of struggling to get breastfeeding to work. The pressure from hospital and health visitors to breastfeed was intense and they made me feel REALLY bad for not getting it right initially. In the end my in laws and husband encouraged me to stop. I felt relief that there was another option and despite really wanting it to work, I was so thankful no one made me out to be a villain.

With my second child, I am exclusively breastfeeding and have done so now for 8 months. She has no intention of giving it up anytime soon, and I am equally happy to carry on.
I must be allowed to say this though - JUDGEMENT IS EQUALLY AS BAD FOR BREASTFEEDING. Please don't think all women who are breastfeeding are sitting there on their high horse feeling better than you. I feel really self conscious breastfeeding in public though I will feed my child anywhere and everywhere she wants. She's hungry, I will feed her. That's my right. But I am not comfortable and also there are LOTS of people out there who make you feel bad. I get comments like ''great, now she's getting her tits out again'' and ''seriously, why can't you go to the bathroom?'' I also get the added bonus - the inlaws and husband's family all didn't breastfeed and they all have essays to share about it. I didn't ask for your reasons why you're not breastfeeding, why are we discussing this over and over? I don't particularly care how you fed your children, no disrespect. I am breastfeeding, but I didn't ask what you did and I don't mind either way! :)

It does really annoy me that I've had more judgement for breastfeeding than the other way around. So many times I have gone to weigh my daughter or to the doctor, they've asked how I am feeding my child. I have been in the position of saying ''formula'' and I have been in the position of saying ''breast''. Whenever I've said formula, the conversation has ended there. When I have said ''breast'' I've had an essay in return. ''Oh you have all these benefits of breastfeeding'', ''How long are you planning to breastfeed'' etc etc. Honestly, unless I ask a question, why are you preaching to the choir?

All of the above just adds to the feeling that we are judged for our choices. Feed your child, or I will judge you. End of. How you feed your child, I quite frankly don't give a damn. :)

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I have epilepsy and was lucky enough to be able to stop my medication through my first pregnancy. I had difficulties getting my son to latch after he was born but worked with a lactation consultant to get him feeding properly. Eventually I was so stressed by my lack of success that I started having auras and episodes related to my epilepsy and had to return to taking medication to control my seizures, forcing me to stop trying to breastfeed and formula feed my son. With my daughter I had a lot more difficulties with the pregnancy and had to change medications so that I could stay medicated with less risk to the baby. She was born 7 weeks prem and had to have a feeding tube for 3 weeks. I was told that while I could pump to feed her, I could not nurse because her mouth was too small. Shortly after that I had to increase my medication to a level that the amount coming into the milk was not safe. I have spent so much time explaining to people my medical history as justification for not nursing. Every mom knows her baby best and her own personal limits. I can't even imagine how horrible the "friends" that criticized my choice would feel if something happened to my daughter because I caved to their uninformed disapproval and continued to feed her my breastmilk while on the higher dose of medication. And that doesn't even come close to how I would feel knowing that a choice I made, something I did, caused harm to my baby. Thank you so much for this article. No mother should feel bad for her choices when it is in the best interests of her child and herself.

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I know how you feel Melody. I have a seizure disorder as well. I had my first when I was 24 (I'm 29 now) and I was afraid of my meds. affecting my daughter if I breastfed since some seizure medicins can cause problems to both you and your babies health. The only thng in my case was that I had surgery to remove the neurons that my seizures were coming from. I was lucky that it was very successful and that I was being weaned off of my meds. My neoro did decide to not reduce my meds to be safe. When I talked to him about what he thought reguarding to breast or bottle he told me that it was up to me even though I should be fine. Therefore, I decided to formula feed just to be safe.

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I was on medication that I couldn't get off of at that time and it would have not been safe for my son.

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my daughter who is 6years now didnt like the breast feeding so i couldnt breastfeed her which i think made me more motivated with my second i wanted to try it and its the best thing ive ever done i stopped breastfeeding him when he was 6 months because he started biting and making the nipple bleed but i was so upset when i stopped its so much easier quicker and cheaper on the bank account i would definitely recommend it to everyone give it a try

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I breast fed our son for many years, but almost quit the first month because of lack of support, and the dumb samples they gave me from the hospital. I was very tempted to use it, but I ended up using it in our cooking, ha! I was very sore for the first month, but figured it out. :)

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With my first he had horrible reflux and would throw up nearly all his feed and had only an hour break between feeds. We did this for 6 weeks until both of us were completely exhausted. We started him on reflux formula, problem solved.
With my second he didn't have reflux but was having 2hr breaks between feeds and seemed hungry after completely draining both sides with each feed. I breast fed him for 4months, when we changed to formula he was having a 250ml (8.5ounce) bottle per feed. No wonder I couldn't produce enough for him. His feeds then changed to 4 hourly with 10 hour sleeps at night. Before formula I thought sleeping through the night was 6 hours between feeds.
I hate this attitude that a woman will produce the amount of milk that a baby needs, supply meets demand, it's just not true. My nephew was hospitalised at a few months old because of severe malnutrition because well meaning dr's and nurses told my sister not to worry about her supply.

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It was the 70's and my husband was worried the child might not get enough to eat , he also wanted to feed his Son . And his Daughter . It worked well he fed the children in the morning while I made his lunch and coffee.It also gave him time with His Children at a time when he did not get much time with them .

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Before I had my daughter I told myself I was going to try to breastfeed for as long as I can. When I had her she did not latch on well at all. The nurses sent us home from the hospital saying that she would eventually get it. When we got home I tried for a couple of days but she never did any better. I started to pump and she did great drinking from a bottle. She had really bad reflux though and it seemed like she was spitting up more than she was drinking! Her pediatrician recommended giving her half breast milk and half formula but that didn't help. After about a month I started her on exclusively formula that is specially made for reflux. It help tremendously. I was sad but relieved. I was so tired of carrying my pump everywhere and I was SO engorged the whole time because I was over-producing. (It took me all of 2 minutes to pump two 8oz bottles!) I hope that our next baby will breastfeed better, I think I would have enjoyed it more if I didn't have to pump.

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Wow, I didn't know there was a formula for reflux. I breastfed, although it was really hard for me because my daughter didn't latch properly (and I had a LOT of help), so I eventually just pumped. She had reflux, and that is so hard, too, because no one ever sleeps!

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Next time, if you try, don't eat citrus foods. I had to cut those put because my son had reflux. (ketchup, ok, tomato sauce, tea, etc) it eliminated his symptoms. For my daughter who was constipated the first few months, I cut out dairy so she would be symptom free. There are things you can do to help if you are producing milk. :)

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Sometimes food additives can cause reflux as well through the breastmilk.

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"The nurses sent us home from the hospital saying that she would eventually get it." Yikes, that's nasty. They must have known some babies need to be taught how to latch. I wonder if they would have shown the same carelessness if your daughter hadn't known how to take a bottle.

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My child never took to it. She tried and did not want to be fed that way. I did not pressure her.

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My son didnt latch on at all so I stopped trying after three days and went strictly bottle/formula. With my daughter I wasnt planning on doing it at all just because my son was difficult with it but while in the hosp my boobs hurt sooo damn bad that I wanted relief so I put her up n she took it no prob. So I bf her n formula fed her two months but I dried up so I went just formula.

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I tried, but just couldnt supply the amount my hungry child required, also in the UK at the time (10 years ago) breast feeding, however much propaganda is put out there, just wasnt acceptable. I tried feeding my son discretely in a corner of a cafe, under a blanket - but still had a drink thrown over me and called some very vile names by an older man! My friend who was with me at the table had no idea I was feeding, so if she couldnt see there was NO WAY he could of! I left in tears and realised (after going to several other "baby friendly" places - that the only acceptable way was out of the way in the toilets - sorry not hygienic! Those 2 factors made me go to formula - although I tried for nearly 12 weeks to feed him.

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omg. that is terrible!

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That's digusting I know years ago my grandma was refused entry into big w with her baby at the time. A nice fellow in a small cafe invited her in. It was a hot day baby was hungry. She was thirsty as well to this day she hasn't been back their. That's just disgusting you were treated like that. It doesn't seem to matter what or how you feed your baby people feel they have the right the make judgment. Some people are just cruel.

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i tried for 6 weeks with my son, b ut he never really figured out how to latch, and my BM made him very gassy and colicky. I realized after i switched to formula, that my milk was really thin, and the thicker, nutritional milk took a really long time to come. (reason for all the gas,and crying because he was probably still hungry). as soon as we switched to formula, he was much happier and started to gain weight really well. I feel bad that i wasn't able to do it longer, but it definitely was not working for us, and it was better in the end, to switch to formula.

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I chose not to bf because my first daughter continued to lose weight after a month and was readmitted for failure to thrive and that's with regular follow-ups with the bf clinic. I chose not to bf my secon daughter because it was too hard to be tied to the baby with a four year old running around too. Both kids did better on the bottle.

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WIth my first child, I breastfed just fine until she was 8 months. However, when our second baby was born, my first was 2.5 yrs old, and I had a REAL hard time trying to breastfeed the baby, while having to take care of a toddler. So I relate very much to your case. I only breastfed our second baby for a month, and even though I was a little sad, I realized that either I bottle fed him or I was just going to be exhausted and not have energy for baby nor daughter nor husband. Unlike with my daughter where I could sleep when she slept, with my son I couldn't rest because I had my daughter running around, so I hardly got any sleep and it just got me exhausted. He has done well on formula btw. :)

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I tried it and it wasnt for me - no big deal. The only thing that I am tired of hearing is breast feeding increases bonding with a baby.....I bottle fed my 3 children and I have bonded with all of them just as well as any mum and breastfed baby. My husband has hardly fed my third child since he is usually dealing with the older two and guess what....he has bonded with him too! Its not just all about the feeding!

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When they talk about "bonding" and breastfeeding what they are talking about is how breastfeeding actually changes the way baby's brain is wired, and mom's too. MRI's of six month old babies and mom's were totally different in both groups in the areas of the brain that relate to intimacy and bonding. There's nothing you can do to replicate brain changes like that!

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Bummer. Guess my twin preeme boys missed this memo

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well i guess science better tell all these bottle fed children that they and mom dont bond as well.....cuz like science is always right.

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Wow Lee-Ann I don't think I have ever read a comment that was so intended to make mothers that can't breastfeed feel bad. Why don't you just come out and tell us all how we have done the wrong thing by our children and how they are all doomed to be less than they should have been. What a crock! There are also studies out there that have shown that there is absolutely NO difference between bottle fed and breast fed babies. Given that "scientists" once "knew" with absolute certainty that the world was flat and the sun and universe revolved around it I think we have a right to be skeptical and make up our own minds about how to do the best for OUR children!

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My first child was so hungry from birth that i am sure he would have sucked my nipple right off. He was always hungry and i tried and tried and tried and my milk didnt come in. 60ml expressded in one day was exciting when i had decided after two weeks to just express. I did that for a total of 6 weeks

Then with my next pregnancy i had twins, one child requiring surgery and time in the nicu and special care nursery. So i was expressing again, feeding, travelling etc. After 4 weeks of utter exhaustion i had my twins home and i was by myself feeding which would take up to 80minutes for both children that my son (2 1/2 year old) went out and went for a walk on the road.

Now i can get people to help, whoever they are.

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If you can get through the first 3-6 weeks, which are definitely the most difficult, the rest is SO much easier! BF is the most natural thing in the universe.

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not for everyone, which I think is the point of this conversation.

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Karen, did you actually read Kellie's post? Would it have magically have been easier after 6 weeks with a toddler and twins, plus the previous stress of having a poorly baby and travelling to hospital? You have to do what is the right thing for EVERYONE, the baby, siblings, yourself and partner.

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Thanks Fiona. I have come to terms with it all but it is NOT the most natural thing I have done add to it the need for expressed milk for my sickgirl and all intimacy was taken out of feeding. I had to choose which child got breast milk and which had formula? How do you choose??? My son and daughter are now 16months old and doing great. My twin son has a dairy allergy and would also vomit breast milk.

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Karen, my eldest screamed for the first 6 months of his life, where was this magical 3 to 6 week mark because I don't think anyone told him about it!

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With #1 I had little support, and was not informed. So I breastfed for 6 weeks and once a day for the next 2 months if that. With #2 my baby had a tongue tie and I didn't realize that it would be healthier and easier to clip than I thought. We had SO many problems at home with breastfeeding, but not so many in the hospital. I also didn't realize that LLL would more than likely be covered under my insurance... Silly me. With #3 I had a c-section and I was very stubborn about breastfeeding. Meaning there was NO WAY I wasn't going to. She had formula maybe twice in the hospital. I exclusively breastfed at home, until 4 months when my husband left me. I tried and tried to bfeed those 2 days, but I was not eating enough. We formula fed, and I bfed twice a day after that up till maybe 7months. I hate that. My girls are all very healthy and have rarely gotten sick. I think that is in part due to my immune system; ie. I get sick 2 times per year and that's it. #1 had 2 ear infection and impetigo once, #2 had 2 ear infections, and #3 had pneumonia and has bronchial asthma. Next child (if we have another) will be exclusively breastfed.

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I commend your efforts. Does not sound like you had an easy time.

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I initially was all for breastfeeding. My son was born a month early so when he was admitted to NICU in the hospital, he was away from me for two days. They provided me with a pump so they would take my colstrium to him when I would produce. Anyway, him being a month early, I was a bit concerned that his mouth was not strong enough to suck so I would pump and feed. After 4 weeks, just recently, I saw my milk began to reduce. I was pumping 3 ounces each breast and had tons saved in freezer. He went through the freezer stash, and started eating 4 ounces at times. I started to panic because I could only now pump 3 ounces between both breasts so I went to his pediatrician and asked for formula. Thank god I went to his doctor because that same day, I was down to 2 bottles and my electricity in my home went away for 6 hours due to a storm so I couldn't pump. Thankfully I had gone to his doctor for formula which he has been drinking now for 2 days and it has been smooth so far. Also, I felt as if I was chained to that pump. I couldn't go anywhere for more than 2 hours and if I did, he wouldn't have any more milk and that was stressing me out. I started to think about going back to work and then what would I leave my mother in law with to feed him? Than's my story and yes I feel a bit guilty but relieved in a way. I'm sure he'll still grow to be a smart, healthy and strong individual.

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Pumping is wonderful but to maintain a good supply you need baby on your breast, idk why but you just do lol! I hope your next experience goes better, best wishes!

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My son is 4 1/2 months old, and I am a breastfeeding mom, and it is not easy...I agree with Amanda....I chose to BF for health benefits for my baby. But I have not had any benefits for me...I have held onto half of my pregnancy weight (30lbs), I don't leave my house because as she said, it's not convienent to BF in public.....I never know exactly how many ounces he consumes (although his weight gain is perfect) and when I have guests I have to leave the conversation and the room when he is hungry.....however my son has not been sick once so that for me makes it worth it....I plan on weaning when he is 6 months old :)

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Mommy Step Mommy, Your concerns and problems are just funny...to me. I've breastfed my son for 20 months and now my daughter is 6 months and I'm breastfeeding her and planning for the next 18 months or so and I leave the house, I don't leave conversations at the table and I don't care how many oz she eats as long as she is gaining and happy. These reasons for stopping are ridiculous

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As a breastfeeding mommy, I know how hard it is and its truly not right for everyone. I am a new mother and I have 11 nieces and nephews. I breastfeed my son, and I have bottle fed my nephew. the debate on should you-shouldnt you has nothing to do with health, brains, others opinions, or ANYONE but you. You have to be comfortable with it. There are many advances in formula, you now have choices for different types of baby, you have special formulas for gasness, fussy babies, babies with alergies, I know the similac line has great choices in formula. With all the new types that are JUST as healthy for your baby, that arument no longer applies. Next- people always say oh you cant bond the same way. Yes you absolutley can. it does not matter how your doing it, the act of feeding any child yours or not is the bonding part not that its breast feedin. I pump so that my husband can feed him when he gets home and trust me they are quite bonded. Next argument- "your a bad mom for not breastfeeding" ok this one urks me soooo much, Ive known amazing moms who formula fed and Ive known horrible mothers who breastfed. While breastfeeding YOU have to be healthy in order to give your child a healthy supply. I once knew a woman who did very hard drugs and breastfed her baby, are you seriously going to tell me THAT was best for her child????? UHHHHHHHHH NO! So the next time someone critisizes your choice- wich ever it may be, just ask yourself these simple questions- 1. do you love your child? 2. would you do anything for your child? 3. Are you happy just to see your child? 4. Do you always make time for your child? and 5. Do you worry when they are away? There you go ladies if youu said yes, you have NOTHING to worry about your doing a great job o matter his or her food choice. I love breastfeeding but its overwhelming at times so make your choice as educated as possible, find out all the facts, and think of your lifestyle, good luck to you all.

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I respect anyone's decision to feed their child any way possible, I was a formula fed baby as I was adopted and I think I turned out pretty fine, but I must say, and this is just my experience of course, that breastfeeding my son is the best thing I have ever done. I am really comfortable with my body and I think that really helped, along with my boyfriend who has been extremely supportive. I found it to be incredibly easy, whenever he's hungry I just lift up my shirt and feed him. At night I sleep mostly naked anyway so I barely wake up take him out of his crib, feed him, and back to sleep we go..it takes all of 20 minutes. Also to me, the idea of feeding my son something intended for baby cow's just grosses me out. I will never judge any woman for formula feeding, but I urge all women to at least give it a try, and before doing so, make sure you have a lot of support, and try to become a little more comfortable with your body, and I think it makes it easier---if you don't have any preconceived taboos about breastfeeding, and just take it as normal...and don't doubt yourself--I know I spent a lot of time in the beginning agonizing over whether my son was getting enough...the weight gain will tell you

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My breasts are HUGE! My son just wasn't able to latch on. Tired pumping and nothing came out.

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She wouldn't take. I wanted to really bad, since I couldnt see her for the first 9 hours of life. That plus her not being able to breastfeed made it hard to connect at first, but now we can't get enough of each other and she's healthy as a horse!

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I did not breast feed straight away due to awaiting to go to skin clinic for a mole on my breast, this was after discussion with several midwives ect. I then went to skin clinic on day 3 and was told it did not look like a nasty and to go home and breast feed. my little man had bottles for nearly a week he did not take to it appeared to feed well then not satisfied and this was child number 3 for me so lack of time and stress was an issue for me too.

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Louise, I'm curious why the midwives told you not to breastfeed. From what I've heard, a woman with cancer can safely breastfeed as long as she's not undergoing treatments that might pass drugs to the baby. What were their concerns?

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