Would you let your child dye his or her hair?

What age do you think it is okay to let your child try dying their hair?

40  Answers

25 13

As far as I am concerned, it is only hair. I let my son wear a mow-hawk, he uses colored gels to spike it up. He has done it since the first grade. He has tried many hair styles. Now he wants to dye his hair purple for the swim team color. I told him I would dye it if he fixes it everyday. We will see what he decides to do.
You have to choose your battles, and hair grows back.

34
0 20

I coudn't agree more. My son has done the same regarding hockey. My daugher is going on 13 and wanted to dye her hair, so I did it for her. Its not permanent, and will grow out. You have to let your kids express themselves in order for them to "find themselves" so to speak. Its all a learning curve, for us as parents and our ever growing children.

0 0

I aggree with both of you and as I told my Mom 10 years ago when she was raising step kids "it's ONLY hair Mom, they are exceptional kids both with straight A's.....what a little spiky highlights?" She did it for them and they looked cute! So when our 12 yr old hit 5'8" this summer and she was doing great, at leader at church, and on her soccer team, I asked my hubby "Ok so would you care if I let her get highlights from ME?" He said "as long as it's not $100 and you can keep it up, and she wants them I'm fine with it." She loves them and they look like the sun kissed her hair, she has a lot of natural highlights anyway. It's only hair and ALL of us have had different big hair, short/short hair, or shaggy hair at some time in our lives! One thing is certain.....hair changes! Pick your battles!

0 0

My daughter is 14 and I just dyed her hair, she likes it! I say choose your battles. People opposed to it.......do you let your child wear nail polish? Same thing?

0 0

You're a nice mom

0 0

your son is smart.

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6 1

When they are no longer children and have a great paying job.

29
0 0

I don't think in this day and age that is a resonable response. Is it such a big deal if they want a few highlights, that THEY can pay for (from a $6 bottle)? My rule is make exceptional grades, and I require A's as long as you are able to make them, and then hair is not a big deal. I pick my battles and hair changes and grows back!

3 0

I don't think that a child should dye their hair until after puberty. Introducing chemicals prior to this time may lead to permanent damage of the hair follicle. I am not a professional and cannot attest to this being a 100% occurrence; but why risk it?

Now if there is some overriding social need that outweighs the risk I have mentioned above, then go for it. But as with all parental decisions, it should be made with careful thought based on the individual needs of your child and not based on what "Susie's Mom" lets her do.

18
0 20

It is absolutely not true, I am a prfessional, and anything you do to your hair cannot affect how it will grow out. The only thing that can change that is if your scalp is severly burned by a chemical, and hair color, whether in-salon, or OTC is not strong enough to do that.

0 1

i've been dying my hair since i was 18 (26 yrs) and i still have most of my hair and haven't lost any do to dying,

3 0

I wasn't saying that you would lose your hair due to dying....but it can change the chemistry of your hair. For African-Americans introducing a chemical to your hair prior to puberty can permanently change the behavior of your hair. How do I know this? Because I have seen it happen....to more than one person. Since I am not a professional (which I stated above) I cannot speak for the masses...but from personal observation and experience it does happen.

0 1

I know there are many cosmetologist out there... will one of you please speak up and let us know what damage it can do or not do? I am a dark complected, very dark brown almost black haired woman and I color my hair every 4-5 weeks. When I say color I mean color, all over foiled highlights, so when it is done it is almost white and I have never lost clumps of hair do to it, no odd reactions to the chemicals. You, just have to know how to take care of your hair with the proper professional produts!!

0 13

If the chemistry of their hair changed after puberty, I lt was die to puberty and hormonal changed in the body. Anything that u put on your hair, permanent or otherwise doesn't go past the scalp. Hence the reason we have "regrowth", the chemistry in color doesn't work that way. I am a hairdresser, am I have clients who I have been taking care I for years who's hair growth pattern, texture, density and everything changes. Hormones and changes in your body does these things. Not hair color. Although I do have to say that even though I myself am a hairdresser, I don't think that I would do anything that wasn't temporary in one way or the other to a child of mine. As they are children, and chances are they will try it and decide just like any adult that they may want something different. An although the hair does grow back, especially on girls with longer hair, the more you do the better chance you have at jeopardizing the integrity of the hair. And in your innocent children it's just not worth it.

0 2

I am also a hairdresser and no coloring hair before puberty will not affect it after the color grows. Hair coloring only affects the hair that has already grown from the scalp and will not affect the hair follicle. I have an 8 year old daughter and I have been giving her a few subtle blonde highlights since she was 5, she now has a bright pink chunk in the front that is semi permanent. I think a few highlights is ok but would never do a full head or an all over color on her till she was older.

0 24

My daughter is about to turn 14 and wants to lift the color of her hair. She's in 9th grade. An strongly considering it. When I was 14 I poured peroxide on my hair and have colored it since!! I let her put in pink extent ions and they were great!

0 0

well i,m after it should i dye mine when i turn 13 in February??

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4 3

I don't want to let my daughter dye her hair at all, she's such a beautiful natural blonde. But that would be hypocritical since I've been dyeing mine for over three years now. I will, however, make her wait until she's old enough to handle most of the mess herself, so likely not until her high school years. Beyond my 'but your pretty hair!' reaction, it seems silly to prevent it. Even the funky colors! Green, blue, purple, why not? It grows back, and as long as she school has no ridiculous dress code against unnatural colors, it's their chance to get it out of their systems. The kid is the one who has to live with the reactions, not me. If I am unfazed by Transformers tees and rose petal tutus worn together in public, why would purple or green hair bother me?

16
9 58

My daughter is 14 and just started her freshman yr in HS....she wants to dye her hair green and blue.....and I was thinking along the same lines as you and will prob let her do it.

2 40

my son is 10 and has been asking for over a year to get a red Mohawk, he keeps his hair short as its very thick and when it gets past a certain length grows out rather than down, this summer holidays we have let him have the Mohawk but lightened to blonde (his hairs a light brown) rather than the red, its all cut out now and is just a short spiked style with blonde tips as school do not like them to have coloured hair (even natural colours) and have to be"sensible" styles, i got advise from several hairdressers other than the one that did it who all said it would be fine with no long term damage

42 5

Well, in the first place, school dress codes exist for good reasons, so dismissing them as ridiculous is a bit harsh. Having spent more than a quarter of a century as a middle school educator, I will tell you that implementing the dress code helped our campus in countless ways. If the dress code includes a prohibition on hair coloring, then let the hair coloring come out during the summer. My daughter had beautiful blonde hair, as did her very good friend. The two of them visited with a former classmate two states away. When our girls returned home, they were redheads. Not even a pretty red, either. Our girls were 16 at the time. I let my daughter know that I was not contributing to the maintenance of that hair color. Period. When she was 17 and wanted to go back to blonde, I paid $$$ to one of the best hairdressers in town. I was perfectly happy to maintain her natural, God-given hair color. Over the years, she has been back and forth between red and blonde. She currently has blonde hair. Her daddy is happy to see her back to her "real" color, as am I. She is an adult and can choose to do whatever she wants with her hair, but we (her parents) really prefer her blonde hair. Her daughter is blonde. I hope she never goes red!!!

42 5

I do not color my hair. Tried it when I was 19 and really hated the results. I am happy with my hair and get lots of compliments on its color (silver) and length (about six inches below my shoulders).

4 3

Dress codes in general are not ridiculous, but some do go far enough to become so. I don't see what good restricting hair color does other than exert control over the kids for the sake of control alone. And kids can get around it. Some time after my graduation, my high school implemented a 'no unnatural hair color' addition. There was a very clear target of ONE girl who had her hair dyed five different colors at once. She was the only student with unnatural colors. She promptly dyed her hair 5 different NATURAL colors at once and they couldn't do a thing about it, as she was not violating the rules at that point and changing them again would prove their discrimination. Besides, who was she hurting with her technicolor hairstyle?

4 3

I dye my own hair black and love it. It's far more flattering than the indeterminate shade I've dubbed 'Midwestern-what-the-hell' that is my natural color. I only wish I could keep out the four or five grey strands I have, I think they'd look striking against the black.

0 82

I can respect that. My daughter has a blonde streak through her black hair in her bangs. This is fine for her school dress code as it is "of natural color". She colors it pink or blue during the summer. I told her I wasn't happy with it but it is her hair and if it gets destroyed or falls out she will have to pay the price for it. She keeps good conditioning and treatments on it and has for the last 2 years. She is 14 and a freshman now. She is very mature and very smart. I think everything depends on the parents, school and the kids. JMO.

1 0

I am eleven twelve in a Mounth. I bleached my hair all the way and put purple in it. Dyed my hair twice before my only regret with the bleach and purple that I did today is I shouldve waited a few days before the purple. Just a dry head now XP it's just hair... Just won't wash it for a week... Hehe

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1 0

Im a hairdresser and will let my girls have a subtle change when they are 13. A few highlights etc.. a good alternative is hair extensions as they come in every colour and dont damage the hair! If my girls want crazy colours then extensions it is.

13
34 97

What a great idea, I had never thought of that.

0 6

That was the compromise my son & I came to. I believe in a"happy medium". I wasn't too fond of the Mohawk, but he really wanted one. He is 13 & at the point of finding his own identity, so I made a deal with him. I him to Google the hair cuts & find one we both are ok with. I also told him since he was still young, let's start with just highlighting the ends first. We are both pretty satisfied with the compromise.

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0 0

I think that kids today grow up too fast, as it is. I wouldn't let my kids dye their har until they were "adults" and able to care and pay for it themselves. If we continue to go on the premise that these types of things are better than others (i.e. tatoos, piercings), then I think we are not doing our jobs as parents and making the tough decisions.

9
1 0

I payed for the bleach kit and purple a few days ago with my allowence... Is that what you mean? I'm a good girl don't worry...

0 0

There's a huge difference between hair and tattoos and piercings though. Hair grows and can be changed back to a natural shade where the other two are permanent. But I understand now why my mom had such a problem with me and the way I dressed and wore my hair. As moms we see the beauty in our children even if they don't. And we don't like to see our kids basically altering that beauty. But I remember my teen years well and a big part of being that age is self identity. The need to stand out as an individual and yes that includes even if thier friends are doing the same thing. Most will outgrow wanting to look so lavish and some find that's where they feel most comfortable. But in a day in age where parents deal with so much more with their children such as gender identification, clinical depression, aspergers, etc... Hair seems so not an issue if it gives your kids confidence and happiness and that sense of freedom to be who they are.

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0 0

I believe this is an absolute personal decision based upon the parent's feelings regarding hair dye as well as the relationship and maturity of the child - not to mention the reasoning for the child wanting to dye his or her hair in the first place. If a child is brunette and wants to be blonde and beautiful, for example, I would personally make them wait until they are 14 or 15 - changing yourself to 'be beautiful' is never really acceptable. At such a young age, we should be helping our children learn that they are beautiful and to find the positive aspects of themselves rather than helping them change them. As an eco-friendly mom, I'm also fairly against using chemicals on my child's head. I say 'fairly' because I actually do dye my hair (back to it's former bright shade, as it grows in a darker auburn now) and I am not a 'do as I say, not as I do' type of person.
That being said, if the child simply wants to dye their hair for the fun of it - spirit day or bright streaks for the summer, etc. - there are many healthy stains available that can be used in place of hair dye. My daughter went through a phase where she loved pink so much she even wanted pink hair, so I allowed her to have a pink streak on each side of her face. The 'dye' was natural, but lasted 6-8 weeks, and was in a location where it could either be seen or covered up. She was ecstatic - her hair matched everything she owned. It was done just for the fun of it. We also naturally lightened her hair this summer using honey and lemon while she was out in the sun. It took her natural shade of dark blonde and brought out her already natural streaks a bit, much like the sun itself can do if you don't mind being in the sun too much.
I pick my battles. Hair is not a battle I'm willing to fight - she can have her hair cut how she likes and I'm accepting of her wanting to play around with the color. So long as she does it in a safe, fun way and not to make herself 'pretty', and doesn't use nasty chemicals in the process, I'm fairly approving.

9
0 20

This is exactly what I was thinking, but I couldnt have said it better! My daughter is 12 and she has friends who do outrageous things just because someone else did it. (dress provocatively, dye hair wild and bold unatural looking colors, and pierce various parts of their bodies, etc.) I dont approve of these things for my daughter, especially for that reasoning. Kids of this age are incapable of knowing what is truly good for them or what may cause them harm. They make decisions impulsively and still need guidance, not being overbearing, just guidance. When we feel it is the right time for our daughter, we will strongly ENCOURAGE beautiful, natural highlights or lowlights that enhance her beauty versus make her look like a clown.

9 18

All the negative people on here going on about chemicals are not too smart. WHAT do you think your kid is breathing????????? There are more chemicals taken in one breath from a city than there would be from months of dying hair. LOL

9
25 13

Agreed! I feel some people like to use that as an excuse.

9 18

Besides, most NORMAL kids want to try funky bright cool colours, the ones that are mostly VEGETABLE dye and are not harmful,,,, people need to live a little!!!!!! My daughter is 3 and asked for a pink strip in her hair, OF COURSE she can have a pink strip its only a hair stain!! haha

0 0

While you cannot prevent your kid from breathing a dirty city air if you live in the city, you do put your kid voluntary to chemicals by introducing him to hair colors and stuff... Even if the hair color has no chemicals why spoil natural innocence of a child by introducing him to hair colors, make up, tattoos, piercings and everything that follows... Kids can want anything, it doesn't mean you should let them everything! I was growing up in a beautiful city of Europe and have a lot to remember. I didn't color my hair until 17. Unfortunately, I see a lot of kids growing up in this country by sitting at home, instead of running around, expressing their natural looks and have a healthy lifestyle!

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7 26

I feel that a child should be making her own decisions when she decides to dye her hair. In other words, be of age. A 16 year old with dyed hair looks ridiculous in my opinion. I know some moms will disagree with me, but children look best with their natural color and hair dye is toxic. It strips and dries out the hair, and makes it less healthy. Why mess with what God created?

9
0 5

but why not let them have fun when they can? as I told my daughter, it will become socially unacceptable once you look for work.

1 8

I think I'm in the minority here. While our kids (13, 8 & 4) have not asked to do it, we wouldn't allow it until at least high school, and we definitely wouldn't allow any unnatural colors (green, blue, purple, pink, etc). I understand that kids are "finding" themselves, and I agree, hair is just hair. It grows out. But the statement it makes is not one I want my children sending to others. I want them to be happy and shine with their natural beauty and personality. In my opinion, expressing themselves with things like piercings, tattoos and colored hair is not "expressing", it's a scream for attention. I want them to learn that they are perfect exactly they are. Some people will love them for it, and others will pay no mind. One does not need to be noticed by everyone to be important. That doesn't mean I don't think there are plenty of happy, well-rounded, successful people who are tatted-up or have a pink mohawk. But like it or not, people will judge a book by its cover. And green hair is not the cover I want for my children. If they grow up and become a rock star, then they can have green hair. Until then, they will stick to natural colors.

7
0 8

couldnt agree more

1 0

I Agree very much, I know it's off the fact that I had a Mohawk with wash out blue .... Grew it out with a permeant purple.. It's hard to seem that I agree.. But I like your ethusiasim with your kids looks.

43 0

Couldn't have said it better myself... plus, if I let them... MIL would go CRAZY

0 0

I totally agree. I have a 15 yr old daughter who wants to dye her hair blue and I am saying NO for many reasons. The main one is that I think it's a slippery slope if I agree to let her do it. Basically, if I let her dye her hair once, twice, three times, then what's next? Tattos, body piercings, etc! That's all fine with me but not until she's 18!

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0 21

As long as they live in my house, they will not be permitted to dye their hair. The kids are already to grown; hair color, body piercing and tota disregard for adults, etc!!!! Why add insult to injury????
Each house hold is different and therefore should be handled based upon the parent(s) perspective. I just do not think it is a good idea!!!

7
1 27

my girls are 5 and 6 i just dyed their hair....i however didn't strip it like the package suggested........it should stay in for a month or two......they also have washable hair dye..........and the koolaid method works well too

7
0 0

i wish my mom was like you

1 0

Mee too

1 0

kool-aid does not come out.

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0 0

I got my first highlights when I was fourteen and dyed all my hair when I was 17. I was the one who had to live with the consequences if I didn't like it. I am now 22 and have since dyed my hair a few times (once pink). Likewise, my brothers used to use the colored hair gel when they were children and loved it. My mom always told me that I was beautiful no matter what I did to my outward appearance but it was more important that my inside (the way I behaved and treated others) was beautiful. I applied that to my life. Obviously you need to inform children that people do make snap judgments based you on the way you look and you need to be smart about the decisions to alter your appearance but letting kids have a little fun with coloring their hair is not a bad thing, in my opinion.

6
0 20

My daughter is 12 and she has friends who do outrageous things just because someone else did it. (dress provocatively, dye hair wild and bold unatural looking colors, and pierce various parts of their bodies, etc.) I dont approve of these things for my daughter, especially for that reasoning. Kids of this age are incapable of knowing what is truly good for them or what may cause them harm. They make decisions impulsively and still need guidance, not being overbearing, just guidance. When we feel it is the right time for our daughter (when she can make choices for herself and explain that she wants to express herself, enhance herself, whatever), we will strongly ENCOURAGE beautiful, natural highlights or lowlights that enhance her beauty versus make her look like a clown. The major point for our household is to think things through before doing them. what are the reasons and why do you want to do it?

5
1 0

At one point I wanted black and pink hair. Because I saw a picture of a girl with it. I thought the colours looked nice. I wanted to test it so I went black and liked it enough where I forgot about the pink. But what I'm saying is it don't mater where they get the impedance it's about what they say about it in all.

0 0

As the daughter of a cosmetologist I'm probably far more liberal than most. My mother let me start dying my hair when I was 13 and I turned out alright. It's just hair dye, not a tattoo or anything truly permanent.

5
0 0

i want to get my hair dyed when i 13 in February what tips do you have me?? I want a black then a little blue across the front

0 20

i have 2 girls the ages of 11yr old and a 13 going on 14. I've been asked from them if they can color their hair, my answer is no. I told them they don't need it, unless they have gray hair. Which at this point they do not have gray hair. They go to a Catholic school and it seems like that school accepts some of the hair coloring, nail polish and lightly makeup. Now they have the wash on coloring on the hair and I'm still not a fan of any kind of coloring for my girls. I've told them that will just make one look like they are trouble and I know for a fact not all kids are trouble makers. But that's just me. So i told them when you are 18 and out of the house, then you can do whatever you want, cause you are not under my roof.

4
1 0

I'm trouble. Purple hair has it written right on it. Hormone raged pre-teen who don't talk much sits watches dbz does tawando and sketches anime all day... I'm trouble for people who are annoyed by geeks :D

5 22

MY mother would not let me dye mine till i turned 18. I did as soon as I turned 18 and now i wish I never did it .Dying your hair really is not good for it and you learn that when you get older.

4
3 0

If they are over the age of 12, yep, LET THEM DYE THEIR HAIR! My son had blue hair for Grades 9, 10, and 11. I even helped him with the dying, because he needed a two-process dye (bleach + color) to achieve his various combinations, usually indigo, purple and aqua. In Grade 12 he began to fade it out. He is now at university, ran his own business during the summer and is still thinking of returning to coloured hair! Clearly, he was not harmed by the experience. If your child is determined to do it, help them and assist them to ensure that the color is clear, crisp and attractive. It's hard to start down that road, as a parent, but if you have raised a good child, hair color is a sideshow.

3
0 0

i,m glad you agree cause i will be 13 in February and i want to dye my hair

0 0

18

2
2 6

I think once a kid gets to be school age, it would be ok to try temporary color like the streaks. Make sure though that their school has no problem with that and if the school does have rules on color--then let them do their hair during summer or even like spring break.

2
1 11

Prob. Not until he/or she was 16.

1
0 0

Well after reading so many say "it's fun" "why not?" "it grows back" etc, I am really not surprised. Our society seems to be forgetting that we are not supposed to be best friend's with our kids, we are supposed to be their parents. I'm not sure why so many think it's great to allow young kids the chance to dye their hair, but the reality is by giving in to every little whim that your kids have, you will find that you have lost control when they are older. I have friends who are now in the position of "omg, I can't WAIT until my kid is out of the house….he/she is driving me crazy!" I am a mom of 3 boys…all three make me proud. They are respectful, intelligent, fun to be around, social…and none of them ever even asked to do something weird to their hair. They are very involved in sports, yet they never asked to dye their hair a goofy color. I have a friend who's daughter decided about 4 years ago to dye her hair pink on one side, and black on the other. I'm sure some of you would think "wow, good for her" but the reality is she is treated differently by the kids at school. It is a choice she made…but you can't expect everyone to think that outward appearances don't matter. It may be unfortunate, but they DO MATTER. And more importantly, showing respect goes a LONG way. So for those who think that dying their hair all sorts of weird colors is cool, I will continue to believe that highlights are okay, but dying it an outrageous color is just a shout out to say that you a person "dying" for attention.

1
0 0

All of my friends and family find me the exact same way as you find your children, and I have mental health issues, and GUESS WHAT?!? My hair is blue. It isn't a shout out for attention, it's a way to express themselves. It's a way to make a kid feel like they belong, and it DOESN'T make them socially unacceptable. People who have dyed hair can still be great people.

0 0

Way to pass judgement mom! Pat yourself on the back for teaching your kids to do the same!

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0 22

I let my daughter get colored highlights, maybe 6 foils or so in Kindergarten, she is now is 4th grade and has had purple, blue and some blonde highlights this last summer. It'll grow out and its fun for her!! I say go for it

1
0 8

Yes! Let them do it. Now is the only time they wont have someone from HR telling them no. I had to wait till I was 42 and on disability before i could color my hair purple. My mom always said no, then my job, then my husband. It took that long to finally be free and it felt so good!! Let them be free when they are suppossed to be. Before the world comes down and puts restrictions on their lives.

1
0 8

And I say any age. But after they ask, make them wait 6 months. If they ask again, then you knoe=w they really want it.

1 0

I asked weekly for two Mounths ^ got purple. I'm lovein it.

0 23

yes i abosoultly agree i just want to bleach it blonde but i would even happily settle for highlights or lowlights

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5 0

Until we know for sure if hair dyes are safe, let them dye strips which allows them to be creative but not apply the dye to their scalp. Remember, if they have any cuts in their scalps, 1/2 hour of hair dye will be absorbed into their blood stream. When you breathe dye fumes, air is filtered of toxins in the lungs but if it enters through a cut, well it is in circulation immediately!

1
0 20

All of what you said might have been slightly true about 50 years ago. There have been many changes in hair color chemicals since then.

0 0

I know a 12 year old who burnt the top of her scalp (with hair dye) so badly - her hair will never grow back! Don't forget they are chemicals.

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13 9

My daughter is 10 and has dark brown hair and she badly wants to dye it with pink highlights, and while i think it would be an awesome idea cause i believe they should be able to express themselves this would require her hair to be stripped down first and that i am not ok with...when she starts high school and can be responsible for it then i say go for it!

1
0 12

My daughter is also 10, and although I wasn't sure of it at first, my husband and I decided it's not a permanent thing. She had been wanting her hair dip dyed, (where only the bottom few inches are dyed). I took her to the hairdressers today, and must admit it's beautiful. She has fair hair and has red violet colour around the bottom 3 - 4 inches. It will fade in about eight weeks, or can easily be cut out.

1 27

My daughter has dark brown hair and i frosted it bright red...you don't have to strip it first i didn't do hers (she is 6) and a month later it is still in when i condition her hair it gets brighter and hasn't faded at all and i skipped the stripping step and just left the gel dye in for 25 minutes didn't damage her hair and she got her streaks that she wanted

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Yes

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0 0

My 12 year old has turquoise hair. We can afford the upkeep and she loves it. It’s how she expresses herself. As long as she’s bringing in good grades and is a loving person that isn’t mean spirited, judgemental, violent or promiscuous - who cares? Pick your battles! It’s 2018 people, not 1957!

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102 0

choose your battles wisely.

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0 0

Yes I have a 11 year old daughter with beautiful brown hair she has always been fond of her hair but recently she has wanted to dye her hair she says she wants to either dye it from brown to blonde or brown to what she calls "unicorn hair" it's a mix between pinks purples blues and a lot of unnatural colours at first I was worried that she was doing it because she thought she was ugly which she reassured me wasn't the case she said "I want to do this I'm very fond of my hair and I love it very much but I want to change my appearance up I think it would be a good change and it makes me feel unique" after that I agreed to let her I said if she gets good grades and continues to go to school I will let her dye it every time it fades until she no longer wants to she was so estatic the second I said yes she started on her plans the school year hasn't started so I'll see her decisions

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0 0

Me,personally, as a 13 year old myself, believe that temporary dyes or natural colors such as brunette, blonde,auburn,etc. are pretty normal and let kids my age express themselves and is a good age. For more "bold" hair colors like blue, pink, or anything like that is more appropriate for 16 year old and up, maybe even 15 if you, as the parent, are okay with that. Therefore, if the child/teen is younger, then temporary dyes, but if they are older than maybe even have a spa night with them and give each other makeovers and dye your hair together(if you do that.)

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0 32

My daughter is 9 1/2 and has been struggling this year with anxiety and medical stuff, which we found out was all because she is going through puberty and per the Dr will bein complete phase 4 by the end of the summer.. Pretty scary for a 9 yr old to hear, especially when NONE of her friends are going through it. So my husband (NOT ME) told her that if mommy says its ok she can get the tips of her hair died what ever color she wants. I said absolutely that is fine with me.

The conversation was 6 months ago, now I am taking her on Saturday to get her tips done professionlly (I don't trust myself to do it), as her your growing up/you had a Great School year gift. I don't see anything wrong with letting the kids express themselves, hair grows back, it gets longer you cut it... its just hair...

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0 0

My sons want to dye their hair yellow. they say they want to be more like their father, Gertrude Trump. I think this is good because Gertrude is a great father to them. They love him very much. I think that dying childrens hair is a great thing to do, I think I might dye my hair rainbow unicorn style.

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0 0

i think they should be allowed to do what they want with their own appearance, I think 11 or 12 is a good age :)

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Here is exactly what I told my kids: As long as they were good people in general (y'know, nice, got passing grades, etc.) they could look however they wanted, because in the end, it only matters what's on the inside, and I will love them no matter what.

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I'm 13 and i like to dye my hair aquamarin but my mom is not okay with that she says girls at these age should ne natural I need a good reason for her to let dye my hair cause i want a different thing in my life maybe i will die tommorow who knows?! So i need this chance
I'm from persia Thank you

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My daughter is 10 and I have said I will allow blue tips/streaks that last only during the Summer. I will not allow it at school (nor would her school). Just a fun thing for 4-6 weeks in the Summer. I see nothing wrong with that.

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I would let my child dye their hair at any age. I've let my daughter dye her hair several times. It's just hair, and it grows back. You can dye it back to the natural color, etc. There are endless possibilities, and in my opinion, it doesn't matter if you like someones appearance, it matters if they like their own appearance.

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My 15 yr old daughter was bullied last year & has been seeing a therapist. Up until now she never cared about her appearance. She is shy but is also gesd strong. She told me she wanted to make a fresh start this year and do a makeover. I was estatic.. However, one request was to dye 2 strips of her "hot pink". I was nit happy.

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Seriously? Hot pink tips are your concern here? Ugh. Parents....

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