Flu Vaccine

Jamie - posted on 11/02/2015 ( 3 moms have responded )

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I've always been skeptical about flu vaccines, last year was the first time I got my daughter the vaccine, she also got it this year, all I've been seeing is negative stuff :(, a site called "vax truth" showed up on my Facebook talking about children dying from the flu shot and it's got me so freaked out !!

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Bobbi - posted on 11/16/2015

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i completely agree with raye ramsey,if you look hard enough you can find something wrong with any product and there will always be someone who had a bad reaction,or the conditions were just right to cause a bad reaction.i am up to date on my daughters vaccines.if there's something i can do to prevent..lets say whopping cough or polio then i will.but this is what if feel is right for me and my child,

Raye - posted on 11/12/2015

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Vaccines are a million times more helpful than harmful. Just because one person may have had a bad experience or something bad happens that someone interprets as being caused by the vaccine, doesn't mean that it's a "normal" effect of the vaccine. In 1998, there was a study that "proved" that vaccines caused Autism. In 2010 that "research" was found to be FALSE, and the doctor was banned from practicing medicine and brought up on 12 counts involving the abuse of developmentally challenged children. However, people still believe the false claims because they either haven't been made aware that the research was bogus, or they are conspiracy theorists that think the truth is actually a cover-up.

With a large enough number of opportunities, any outrageous thing is likely to happen. 179,000,000 doses of flu vaccine are estimated to be distributed in the US during the 2015-2016 flu season. There's always a risk of something bad happening. Even just getting out of bed in the morning, any number of things could kill you. But the risks are not very likely for most people.

Statistics can lie, because people twist them to their own purpose to show causality where maybe there is none.
1) 100 people take Drug A and 100 people take drug B. One person dies (from car accident) while taking Drug A, but two people die (from gunshot and from drowning) while taking Drug B. Some people may take that out of context to report that twice as many people died while taking Drug B. Technically that's true, but some people may go further to imply that the drug actually CAUSED the deaths, even if no direct link was ever found.
2) There were almost half the number of fatalities by lightening strike in 2014 (26) than in 2006 (48) and lightening fatalities seems to be on a decreasing trend. Someone could postulate that lightning has gotten safer over the last 8 years. But that's not likely.
Statistics can lie.

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