has anyone got experience with rotavirus?

Zuzana - posted on 01/26/2010 ( 6 moms have responded )

11

5

0

my daughter is suffering with this viral illness now for the 10TH day, symptoms remain the same and she is really rapidly loosing weight.Has anyone got any ideas how to help her eat and drink?thank u

6 Comments

View replies by

Zuzana - posted on 01/27/2010

11

5

0

thank u everybody, we have already spent 4 days in hospital on IVs and everything, but they let us home. it´s been 10 days since and she is better only with regards to her temperatures, seen the doctor again and she said she is not bad enough for hospitalization again but it´s hard to watch her suffer like this, she is dropping on weight with every day and we are due to fly on sat!i´m desperate for her to get better :(

Catrina - posted on 01/26/2010

5

8

1

I agree about a trip to the hospital. You also need to check for signs of dehydration. Those would be the area around her eyes starting to be sunken in a bit, dry mouth/ tongue, etc. I would take her right in to get checked out, dehydration can be really dangerous with children, especially young ones.

Jennifer - posted on 01/26/2010

1,431

1

298

She may need to go to hosp. to be checked. If she has had diarrhea for that long, then she could be low in potassium. If that is the case, then she will need to be on IV's to help get it back up. It is hard to get over something if potassium is low, and it is almost impossible to get potassium back up on your own with out iv's

Barbara - posted on 01/26/2010

8

33

1

Hope that helps...I was told pedialyte is great for dehydration...and sterilize everything....wash the crib down and mattress....

Barbara - posted on 01/26/2010

8

33

1

Prevention

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) now recommends a rotavirus vaccine be included in the lineup of routine immunizations given to all infants.

The RotaTeq vaccine has been found to prevent approximately 75% of cases of rotavirus infection and 98% of severe cases. Another vaccine, Rotarix, also is available and is effective in preventing rotavirus infection. Your doctor will have the most current information about these vaccines.

A previous rotavirus vaccine was taken off the market in 1999 because it was linked to an increased risk for intussusception, a type of bowel obstruction, in young infants. Neither RotaTeq nor Rotarix have been found to have this increased risk.

Frequent hand washing is the best tool to limit the spread of rotavirus infection. Kids who are infected should stay home from childcare groups until their diarrhea has ended. In hospitals, rotavirus outbreaks are controlled by isolating infected patients and following strict hand-washing procedures.
Professional Treatment

An infant or toddler who becomes moderately or severely dehydrated may need to be treated in a hospital with intravenous (IV) fluids to bring the body's fluid and salt levels back to normal. Most older kids can be treated at home.

Your doctor may need to test your child's blood, urine, or stool to confirm that the diarrhea is being caused by rotavirus and not by bacteria. Because antibiotics do not work against illnesses caused by viruses, the doctor will not prescribe antibiotics to treat a rotavirus infection.
Home Treatment

To prevent dehydration, follow your doctor's guidance about what your child should eat and drink. Your doctor may suggest that you give your child special drinks that replace body fluids, especially if the diarrhea has been going on for longer than 2 or 3 days.

In general, kids with mild diarrhea who are not dehydrated should continue to eat normally but should receive more fluids. (Fruit juices and soft drinks can make diarrhea worse and should be avoided.) Those who have mild to moderate dehydration should be given an oral rehydration solution in small, frequent amounts to correct the dehydration and then should go back to eating normally. Children who are breastfed should be breastfed throughout.

A child who is vomiting will need to eat smaller amounts more frequently. Follow your doctor's guidance and avoid giving your child store-bought medicines for vomiting or diarrhea unless your doctor recommends them.
When to Call the Doctor

Call the doctor for advice if your child has signs of a rotavirus infection, including watery diarrhea, fever, nausea, and vomiting. Call immediately if your child is showing signs of dehydration

[deleted account]

my husband started off with it and went to the er... within 5 hours i had to go and then the next day my son had it he threw up for 2 days and had he poops for a week or so... bad rashes... then after a week my parents came and got him and it passed o my dad then mom then grandmom.... go to the CDC website.... it stays in the host for 2 weeks or longer

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms