Early signs of autism

Patricia Margo - posted on 05/30/2013 ( 13 moms have responded )

3

0

1

My 21 month old knows colors, shapes, repeats any words you tell her to, speaks sentences, many words she taught herself. Could these be a signs of Autism? She's extremely intelligent.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Caroline - posted on 06/10/2013

2

0

0

With my experience in children with Autism, I have noticed that there are a few signs that a parent will notice right from the start. A child with autism will hold their hands in certain fashion, like to rock, rotate or spin things. and most of all they do not adjust well to strangers. And they tend to cover their ears with loud noises, and in some cases the child will start to cry uncontrollably.
An autistic child hates change in routine, they don't like their order to be interrupted.

Jennifer - posted on 06/10/2013

39

5

1

This all sounds like perfectly normal development to me. I would be more worried if she were not doing some of these things. She sounds like a very bright, intelligent girl. Enjoy!

Deanna - posted on 06/05/2013

280

32

0

Autism is not always associated with brilliance. From http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/autis...

What is autism?

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of complex neurodevelopment disorders, characterized by social impairments, communication difficulties, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Autistic disorder, sometimes called autism or classical ASD, is the most severe form of ASD, while other conditions along the spectrum include a milder form known as Asperger syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS). Although ASD varies significantly in character and severity, it occurs in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups and affects every age group. Experts estimate that 1 out of 88 children age 8 will have an ASD (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, March 30, 2012). Males are four times more likely to have an ASD than females.

Sara - posted on 06/02/2013

23

0

4

I have worked in mental health and with autistic kids. Being bright is not symptom of autism. Early signs are not wanting to be held or being withdrawn.

Kimberly - posted on 06/01/2013

43

29

9

My 8 year old did everything early. She walked at 9 months, could read small books and write and spell her name, my name, her Mamaw and pawpaws name, and her brother and sisters names before she started Pre-K. She is now going to 3rd grade and because of her ADHD they had a physiatric evaluation done and they do IQ testing when they do the evaluation and she tested in the high-superior range and is at 5th and 6th grade levels in math, English, and reading. She is very intelligent but not autistic. You just have a very smart child! Work with her and help her learn new things. My daughter loves to learn everything she can and is doing 4th grade worksheets that her older sister brought home over the summer.

13 Comments

View replies by

Kristy - posted on 06/18/2013

52

17

3

I can say as the mother of an autistic child that your daughter sounds pretty normal to me. If she suddenly stops doing all these things and starts regressing then I would worry. How is she soically? Is she easy going & makes friends easy or is she a loner prefering to play by herself? Does she make nice neat lines with her toys or obsess over spinning objects like the dryer? Does she have a hard time transitioning from a prefered task to a non prefered task? Does she not look at you when she talks to you or you to her? Does she have serious fits of rage? Unconsolible crying & screaming for as long as an hour ata time. If she has any thing like this then I would have herlooked at, otherwise enjoy your daughter's early development.

Monica - posted on 06/03/2013

32

1

5

My son knows ABC'S counts to 59 reads small words and spells his name all before he was 2. He's all most 3 in August. He has speech delay but he can repeat everything I say and has some small behavioral issues do to his communication. Just found out he has very mild Autism. Get her checked out soon:) It helps to know for sure:)

Jude - posted on 06/03/2013

1

38

0

I don't know if the fact that your daughter is very intelligent means that she has autism, but if she has then embrace it!!!! My 6 year old daughter has high functioning autism and I wouldn't have her any other way it makes her the loving and fantastic child that she is. I find it very offensive that someone would comment saying she hopes your daughter isn't autistic like its something that she has caught!!! Love her for who she is autistic or not xx

Patricia - posted on 06/03/2013

1

0

0

I have a three yrs old grandson who won't speak a single word. He almost seemed like he maybe a deaf child, we had his hearing tested it was fine. we have had speech therapist come and work with him. Not much progress .We are unsure what to do.He has had some trama in his life his mother was injured and has been not living with her for almost a year .going through a transition of being back with his mommy . not sure what to expect when he comes home. any help in helping him with finding his little voice.Has been tested by a specialists and come to conclud no autisium . So we are unsure how to help him .We want to work with him at home to help him find his voice.
Thanks
Nana
Denham Spgs, La

Amanda - posted on 05/31/2013

245

2

21

I have worked with children with autism. From the sounds of it I would have to say no, but if you are worried the take her to see a specialist. My cousins son is being evaluated soon because he is two years three months, doesn't talk yells all day to the point of throwing himself on the ground all day, separates his blue toys and wont play them. He is behind on his social and mental development. From what you say your daughter is smart, but if socially she doesn't seem to match what is set for age it could be something else. If she is it sounds like she would be high functioning autism. Hope it isn't!

MissMommyMay - posted on 05/31/2013

98

0

29

As a parent, you’re in the best position to spot the earliest warning signs of autism. You know your child better than anyone and observe behaviors and quirks that a pediatrician, in a quick fifteen-minute visit, might not have the chance to see. Your child’s pediatrician can be a valuable partner, but don’t discount the importance of your own observations and experience. The key is to educate yourself so you know what’s normal and what’s not.

Monitor your child’s development. Autism involves a variety of developmental delays, so keeping a close eye on when—or if—your child is hitting the key social, emotional, and cognitive milestones is an effective way to spot the problem early on. While developmental delays don’t automatically point to autism, they may indicate a heightened risk.
Take action if you’re concerned. Every child develops at a different pace—so you don’t need to panic if your child is a little late to talk or walk. When it comes to healthy development, there’s a wide range of “normal.” But if your child is not meeting the milestones for his or her age, or you suspect a problem, share your concerns with your child’s doctor immediately. Don’t wait.
Don’t accept a wait-and-see approach. Many concerned parents are told, “Don’t worry” or “Wait and see.” But waiting is the worst thing you can do. You risk losing valuable time at an age where your child has the best chance for improvement. Furthermore, whether the delay is caused by autism or some other factor, developmentally delayed kids are unlikely to simply “grow out” of their problems. In order to develop skills in an area of delay, your child needs extra help and targeted treatment.
Trust your instincts. Ideally, your child’s doctor will take your concerns seriously and perform a thorough evaluation for autism or other developmental delays. But sometimes, even well-meaning doctors miss red flags or underestimate problems. Listen to your gut if it’s telling you something is wrong and be persistent. Schedule a follow-up appointment with the doctor, seek a second opinion, or ask for a referral to a child development specialist.
---http://www.helpguide.org/mental/autism_s...

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms