Doc's want to test my 14month old for ADHD!!

Zoe - posted on 11/23/2009 ( 270 moms have responded )

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My 14 month old daughter is very very active, to the point where the doc want s to check her for ADHD... Is it just me but i think She is WAAAAAAYYY to young to even consider that! And it seems like doc's shove every child who is over active into that catagory and drug them up. I don't want to offend anyone and i know some kids auctually are ADHD and need med's to calm down, But i was just wondering if anyone else had been told the same thing??

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[deleted account]

Have you ever had him tested for food allergies? With all the overprocessed foods, dangerous chemicals sprayed on foods, food additives such as (high fructose corn syrup), and high amounts of sugar in our diets, food allergies are becoming a big problem, not only for children but for adults as well.

Kimberly - posted on 12/05/2009

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I have 4 sons who have numerous problems from ADHD to Bi polar and yes some of them where very hyper as toddlers others where not but I have never had a doctor want to medicate my baby .. They struggled with medicating my 5 year old and he was off the wall and did dangerous things. I would get a second opinion from a child pyschatrist not a peditrician. Good Luck

Jana - posted on 12/04/2009

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Wow, Time to switch pediatricians in my book. That is way to young to diagnose a child with ADHD. I they have not given you any info here is some.

What 14 month old child is not going to be very very active!! ?? This is ridiculous! I work in mental health and have to tell you that i have not seen a counselor or dr. even consider this kind of diagnosis on a child that young EVER! Ussually they wait until the child is school age and see how they interact with peers and in a structured environment. Between 4 and 6 is when i start to see kids getting diagnosed and that is in severe cases where the child cannot function properly in a structured environment such as school. I also have a child with ADHD. It is a challenge. They diagnosed around age 6. I won't medicate as of yet. We are working with structure and incentive programs. He is incredibly intelligent and i want to put off medicating as long as possible. Also if it is not on the list below. I sign to watch for is if she appears to be able to get by on very little amounts of sleep. They do not require as much sleep as other children and it does not seem to effect them adversely. Hope you find this helpful.



Also, Lot's of exercise and you can meet with a nutitionist or even look up on line calming foods to feed for dinner. Also lavender in her bath at night may help if sleep is an issue.







The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders lists the symptoms required to establish a diagnosis of ADHD. Throughout the 50 year history of the manual, these criteria--the official definition of ADHD--have evolved with each new edition. This is a short history of that evolution, plus the currently accepted criteria.



The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders includes standardized diagnostic criteria for many psychiatric disorders. First published by the American Psychiatric Association in 1952, the manual is used as a resource by the majority of mental health professionals. In its earlier editions, many clinicians considered the DSM merely a tool for researchers. Now, in an era of managed care, clinicians are often forced to rely on the standardized criteria in the DSM in order to remit insurance claims. And its impact goes even further. If a condition is acknowledged by the DSM, it can be credibly used in a legal defense, or in a disability claim. In the case of ADHD, a diagnosis can mean that a child is entitled to receive special educational services from his or her school district.



In its 50-year history, the DSM has been significantly updated four times--in 1968, in 1980, in 1987, and in 1994. It wasn't until the second edition was published in 1968 that a disorder resembling ADHD appeared in the DSM. The "hyperkinetic reaction of childhood" was defined as a type of hyperactivity. It was characterized by a short attention span, hyperactivity, and restlessness.



In the third edition of the manual (DSM-III) published in 1980, the name of this childhood disorder was changed to Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), and its definition was expanded. The new definition was based on the assumption that attention difficulties are sometimes independent of impulse problems and hyperactivity. Therefore, the disorder was redefined as primarily a problem of inattention, rather than of hyperactivity. In keeping with this approach, two subtypes of ADD were presented in DSM-III--ADD/H, with hyperactivity, and ADD/WO, without hyperactivity.



The inclusion of ADD/WO has been the subject of debate ever since. When the third edition of the manual was revised in 1987 (DSM-IIIR), the name of the disorder and its diagnostic criteria had been overhauled, once again emphasizing hyperactivity. The authors now called it Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and consolidated the symptoms into a unidimensional disorder, without any subtypes at all. This definition did away with the possibility that an individual could have the disorder without being hyperactive.



After the publication of the DSM-IIIR, a variety of studies were published supporting the existence of ADD without hyperactivity, and the definition was changed again in the fourth, and most recent, edition of the manual published in 1994 (DSM-IV). The authors did not change the name ADHD, but the symptoms were divided into two categories--inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive--and three subtypes of the disorder were defined: ADHD, Primarily Inattentive; ADHD, Primarily Hyperactive/Impulsive; and ADHD, Combined Type.



The DSM-IV listing attempts to describe the typical manner in which ADHD manifests in affected children--when symptoms appear, when parents and caretakers can reasonably expect the symptoms to attenuate, and what factors may complicate the diagnosis of ADHD.



The DSM-IV urges clinicians to use caution when considering an ADHD diagnosis under certain circumstances. The manual notes, for example, that it is difficult to diagnose ADHD in children who are younger than 4 or 5 years of age because the variability in normal behavior for toddlers is much greater than that of older children. It also recommends that evaluators use caution in diagnosing adults with ADHD solely on the adults' recollection of symptoms they experienced as a child. This "retrospective data," according to the DSM-IV, is sometimes unreliable.



Below are the current diagnostic criteria for ADHD, taken from the text-revised edition of the DSM-IV, which was published in the summer of 2000. Note that this excerpt comprises only a fraction of the DSM-IV's entry on ADHD, and it should be used only for informational purposes. It is not intended for self-diagnosis or for use by anyone other than a qualified health professional.



diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder



(A) Either (1) or (2):



(1) six (or more) of the following symptoms of inattention have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is maladaptive and inconsistent with developmental level;



Inattention



* often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities

* often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities

* often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly

* often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)

* often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities

* often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework)

* often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools)

* is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli

* is often forgetful in daily activities



(2) six (or more) of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is maladaptive and inconsistent with developmental level:



Hyperactivity



* often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat

* often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected

* often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness)

* often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly

* is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"

* often talks excessively



Impulsivity



* often blurts out answers before questions have been completed



* often has difficulty awaiting turn



* often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)



(B) Some hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that caused impairment were present before age 7 years.



(C) Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g., at school [or work] and at home).



(D) There must be clear evidence of clinically significant impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning.



(E) The symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, or other Psychotic Disorder and are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, or Personality Disorder).

Denise - posted on 11/29/2009

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as a licensed clinical social worker i have some thoughts here...1) MOST of the advice you're getting is on track and helpful 2) there are many misconceptions about the disorder, the diagnostic criteria actually states that symptoms must be present before age seven, but until school performance is an issue i wouldn't even go there with diagnosing, labeling, and possibly meds...unless child is engaging in extremely dangerous behaviors because she can't control impulsivity...which really isn't all that uncommon with young children anyhow since they don't understand consequences yet...why they have parents to look out for them, 3) heredity is important, but not all conclusive...there is a genetic predisposition for most disorders that is passed on in families...and environment can trigger these predispositions...so it's not accurate to say that it is all "learned"...like pretty much everything in all children, it's a combination of both nature and nurture, BOTH can have a very strong impact/influence...children are not born blank slates, genetics can be very powerful regardless of environment!!! but environment can very strongly influence also, it's just not "everything"...that said, behavioral interventions for whatever your daughter is struggling with will be very helpful...check out magic 1,2,3 or love and logic, both can both can be helpful at a very early age...for now mostly i'd say just eat your wheaties and vitamins and keep up...with a different Doc for sure...14m is too young to go there! may the parenting force and energy be with you! :) ps if you google diagnostic criteria for ADHD you will find lots of helpful and informative sites and resources

Debbie - posted on 11/28/2009

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First of all there is no "test" for ADHD. A diagnosis of AHDH is given after parents and several other people who have daily contact with the child, such as teachers, give input (usually by filling out a rating scale) The doctor considers medical records, evidence/diagnosis of ADHD in family members, and the rating scales metioned earlier.. THEN the doctor can make an educated guess. The doctor may prescribe one of many medications for ADHD based on his/her findings. In 17 years of teaching, I have seen an abundance of children who were diagnosed with ADHD. In some, medication made no difference at all, leading me to wonder if that student was ADHD or just plain BAD. In others, it was like night and day. The medication does work on a child who is truly ADHD. My own grandson was diagnosed with ADHD in kindergarten. Although his pediatrician and mother had some reservations about putting him on medication at such an early age, there was a WORLD of difference in his behavior and performance at school.



ADHD stands for Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder. My first child was into everything at that age. Her youngest climbed on everything at that age. I would be inclined to believe that your daughter is just overly active (God bless you!) ; and very few, if any, 14 month old babies have an attention span of any length. It's constantly from one thing to another. You're right it IS waaaaayyyyy to early to seriously consider ADHD. It reminds me of a doctor I once went to who wanted to put my 17 year old daughter on Prozac for her allergies. Dump the doctor and find another.

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Olubukunola - posted on 12/05/2009

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There is nothing wrong with ur child the moment medication is applied believe me you then everything will be wrong. Where i come from it is normal for kids to be active but as times goes on thy sttlle down but here in america everything is a disease or sickness. Its all depend on you.

Melissa - posted on 12/05/2009

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no. i would get a new pediatrician.we have one of those quack doctors also here in gouverneur who is known for putting ALOT of kids on medicine and he doesnt even do testing. he just says yup it sounds like adhd. here a script.my pediatrician says that kids should not be tested before the age of 7 because their still developing the most in these ages.my daughter was so hyper at the age of 10 months and still is, but when she got into school, it helped her to settle down alot. she is still hyper but knows when it is time to do work. my oldest son who is going on 10 was diagnosed with adhd and is on medicine, but he is also getting better off of it too. work with your children and let them have time to learn themselves also.

[deleted account]

I wish I had your doctor! Yes, your child is too young to test -- and definitely too young to medicate for ADD.



I'm sure my 8yo does have ADD, but her doctor won't test. I homeschool and he says since she's not with a group of peers we can't tell what is typical for kids her age. He's not spent more than 5 minutes with her - what does he know! I keep him because he doesn't pressure us to vax or medicate for anything!

Valerie - posted on 12/05/2009

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That is weird!!!..I was told by close family member to test my child but i never did because my gut feeling said my child was just active like any child...so go with inner feeling and doctors are not always right...good luck...these days everyone wants to cure everything with drugs..my child never was ADHD and healthy young man in the marines now...

Stephanie - posted on 12/05/2009

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Hi Zoe, i'm sorry that things are so crazy for you at the moment.I really believe that time will tell.I also believe a mom know's her own child best.I don't know if you are around any children who are adhd or add.It can be very dangerous for that specific child and actually others who may be around the child with adhd.Not so much the add but definitally the adHd.My friends son has adhd and has really hert his little sister and himself.They also tend to want to get out of the house and try all different ways to do so.The point being if you are not worried about it then I would definitally wait,but if you are thinking he/she might hurt someone or them selves then take the next step.I feel so bad for anyone having to go threw this kind of thing.

Melissa - posted on 12/05/2009

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I think it's too early to tell too if she's has ADHD. My son was diagnosed with it in pre-school with his teacher documenting his behavior as to why she felt he was ADHD,then I gave the notes or report to my family physician. She had been teaching pre-school for 15yrs. At home I called him my destroyer,because he always took things apart,that I'd have to throw away. He's 14yrs. old now and on medication which has helped him do alot better in school. I'd wait til school and see what they may see.

[deleted account]

That is way to young. I have read that to many drs. are handing out meds in alarming amounts. I have also read that with older children who have food allergies can have problems with hyperactivity. You really need to find another doc. Maybe one that is more holistic.

Sasha758 - posted on 12/05/2009

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I had no ideal you can tell they had it that young.. My son is 6 and we just testing him for it.. I started see the signs after he wouldn't calm down enough to do his school work.. But normally I think all kids are busy, active and happy.. And I still refuse to let them give him medication.. I just can't see why a doctor would suggest that a toddler has ADHD..I would try a 2nd opinion..Either way, if meds is not your choice don't subject your baby to it...

Diane - posted on 12/05/2009

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I agree with you she is way to young to even considering taking medication for ADHD. She most likely just an active 14 month old. Some kids are more quisitive than others . I have three graown children and each one is different. My oldest son keop me busy and when he was in kindergarten I had him tested and he was not ADHD. He just liked keeping eveyone on their toes. Enjoy her behavior and help her explore because before you no it she will be all grown up and out of the house.

Jessica - posted on 12/05/2009

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Seriously? Find yourself a new Dr because its seems you have a quack.....14 month olds are suppose to be hyper and suppose to have the attention span of 2 mins. ADHD is real but its over diagnosed, because parents are too lazy to find the real problem with their childs behavior and simply want to medicate the child. I would wait til shes 6 yrs old before you have her tested.

Tina - posted on 12/05/2009

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my daughter has ADHD i knew this from birth but, just like most docs they wouldnt even think about checking her until she was 3 1/2...you dont really now a child has it until there pre-school to school age bc in most causes they are just over active, i would say no and wait until she is older....best of luck.

Marie - posted on 12/05/2009

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The reason a child is tested for, and given medication for, ADHD is because the condition is impacting the child's ability to learn and interact socially in school. I am a certified special ed teacher AND the mother of three children, two of whom were diagnosed with ADHD. It doesn't make sense to me that a doctor would consider meds in a child so young, especially since some of the side effects are slowed growth, poor appetite, flattened affect, and sleep disruption. I wonder, though, if your doctor is concerned about other developmental issues. I strongly urge you to find another doctor, perhaps even a pediatric neurologist, who is better versed in pediatric developmental disorders.

Tania - posted on 12/05/2009

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I have son with adhd and i think your child is too young to make such a diagnosis. Wait until at least starting school. Plenty of activities and play time is what your child needs with lots of focus on positive reinforcement when she is doing things well.

Natasha - posted on 12/05/2009

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My daughter is very active as well and her doctor has even commented on that fact, but they have never said anything like that. I would tell them to hold off on that thought. There is nothing wrong with a toddler being hyper. That is how they learn and explore new things.

Sonette - posted on 12/05/2009

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My daughter is now 5. After birth she only slept for 5min in nap times. After a year she only would sleep for 15min during the day. At age 2 she stopped taking nap times and only fell asleep around 11 - 12 at night. She is still busy - very creative. Still going late to bed. But such an angel - demanding daring cheeky. I have got my hands full, but love every moment of it.

Monique - posted on 12/04/2009

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I am very concerned about the way they are looking to label children that do not fit in the box, I myself have my daughter currently being run around the mill because she is not social enough or rather does not have the text book social skills, it is exhausting.. As a nurse it is also concerning that they are now discovering many side effects of the drugs namely Ritalin used for ADHD and that is even more concerning. If she is over active you can have her allergy tested using hair follicles depending on where you are.. she may be naturally active or some additives or colours may be contributing. Hope that this helps.

APRIL - posted on 12/04/2009

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way too young it shouldnt be even addressed til they are in school this dr sounds like akick back junkie get a new dr. all he wants is his bonus checks

Angela - posted on 12/04/2009

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just a little note zoe, as a nurse i can tell u they have certainly taken this ADD/ADHD to new levels of 'bad press'! anything that cannot b explained/children that are "over active" etc and so forth they put this 'label' on them I can't stand it bcuz it totally overshadow the ones who truely have this issue/i absolutely agree with u she is way to young!

Debbie - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Zoe:

Doc's want to test my 14month old for ADHD!!

My 14 month old daughter is very very active, to the point where the doc want s to check her for ADHD... Is it just me but i think She is WAAAAAAYYY to young to even consider that! And it seems like doc's shove every child who is over active into that catagory and drug them up. I don't want to offend anyone and i know some kids auctually are ADHD and need med's to calm down, But i was just wondering if anyone else had been told the same thing??


Zoe, there is no way I would do that.  If you do research there really no way of testing her any way.  My son is 14 and he has been on medicine off and on since 8 or 9 yrs old.  We try different ways.  But at 14 months they are very active any way.  Don't do it.  At least wait until she in school.

[deleted account]

I am going to assume that she is very active, enough that the Doctor has either been told by you, or seen it first hand.

Medication for children for adhd........wow............especially at her age.

I would suggest that you look at other reasons and options first.

My son was very much the same, and I kept telling my husband he is hyperactive :-)



Anyway, when he was two we had our little girl. We found out when she was just a couple of months old that she was lactose intolerant [she was displaying physical signs]. It started me on a trek of watching the kids foods.

Let me tell you now, that it is amazing what a difference you can make to the littlies by simply working out if they have intolerances to certain things.

We discovered our son cannot have anything with colours or salicylates, which are found in Tomatoes, citrus, broccoli, cauli, all the things that you think are healthy for them ended up being the worst.

It may be worth you looking at foods first if you think she may be reactive to those things. Royal Prince Alfred Hospital have an allergy unit, [for intolerances too] and also have a great book called 'friendly foods' which will explain what foods can do. Alot of it is behaviour based. Kids who have changed there diet have settled in their behaviour, still play lots and active, but more settled.

One example I could give you is that I remember getting all teared up one night after giving our son his bath. As he was on the bed ready to change into his nappy and pj's he layed there for me and smiled. Now this may not seem like much to most, but if you have had a child that has never layed and let you dress him before, and has always run up and down the bed and wriggled etc, well let me tell you......that was when I knew it was the food doing it to him.

He is 7 now, and knows the feelings, signs etc when he has had something that doesn't agree with him.



Another book to look at is the Sue Dengate series, Failsafe foods. It, in my opinion goes hand in hand with the 'friendly foods' book.



I hope this helps, it is one thing to eliminate if you are worried about how active she is anyways. :-)

Jessica - posted on 12/04/2009

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If your doc thinks that there's a "test" for ADHD, you need to think twice about his expertise in this particular area. An ADHD diagnosis is generally built over time taking into account how the child's behavior impacts his/her family, social, and academic (if appropriate) areas of their lives, as well as how the child percieves himself/herself. Obviously you're probably not there yet. When you're evaluating how she's doing, do you feel like she's active and curious, or scattered significantly more than the average 14 month old? Again, tough to tell- they aren't known for their ability to focus for very long, and some kids just really groove on the gross motor stuff. I hope this helps a little.

Debi - posted on 12/04/2009

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I have a daughter that is ADHD and I would have never had her checked at that age, all these doctors are so use to seeing these lazy kids now a days any other kid that is even a little hyper they day ADHD or ADD. I would not worry about any other opinions from more doctors about this until he is much older.. I would also change my Doctor but this is all "MY" Opinion.. Good Lucky and God Bless

Heathr - posted on 12/04/2009

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unless ur seeing signs like you talk and try to teach some things and she pays attention for like 2 secs and then switches to something else and then something else and something else and so on I don;t think you have anything to worry about. Get a new doc. This one is trying to make the pharmacuetical companies rich!

Nykee - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Ricki:

I completely agree, she is way to young to be diagnosed with any form of ADD. I think someone should check the doctors head. They wanted to check our five year old for ADHD because he has trouble concentrating on one thing for more than five minutes (sometimes). As far as I am concerned he is FIVE! He does very well in school and is incredibly smart.


I'm with you! Teachers in elementary schools would rather recommend a child who is more difficult than average to be drugged into sumission rather than to actually find what makes that child ticks. Stand your ground. A school system in Pennsylvania (where I used to live) bullied the mother of a kid I babysat for, who also went to the day care I worked in - they would call her in for meetings and bombard her making her feel like she had no options. It's hard not to cave - but you know your child best. Kudos to you!

Ricki Lee - posted on 12/04/2009

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I completely agree, she is way to young to be diagnosed with any form of ADD. I think someone should check the doctors head. They wanted to check our five year old for ADHD because he has trouble concentrating on one thing for more than five minutes (sometimes). As far as I am concerned he is FIVE! He does very well in school and is incredibly smart.

Bekki - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Linda:

14 months seems too young to be tested for ADHD. I may be wrong but if I'm not mistaken, the diagnosis can only be done after the child turns 6 or 7 years old. I think its normal for a young child to be very active because at that age they tend to be a bundle of energy. I know mine was. I think its best you seek for a second opinion before you decide on it. Good luck!


Diagnosis can be done at any age. Any..age..



 



My son is 5 years old and has a full diagnosis of ADHD, medication and all. The med they put him on was adderall. he took one pill and his body did not respond the way it might when he's 7, so i pulled him off, called his doctor and she agreed with my decision. So we are managing it on our own until he hits 6 then we will try meds again.



 



ADHD can be diagnosed not only through tests but through imaging of the brain. In children with ADHD there are sometimes differences in the structure of the brain.. When diagnosis is based on behavior alone it usually must be a group decision between doctors therapists and the school district.

Samantha - posted on 12/04/2009

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she is too young to be tested. My doctor would not test my son until he was 5 years old and the school wanted him tested before that.

Penelope - posted on 12/04/2009

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I agree with all the answers below. Give her lots of play time without toys that play for her and feed her good, healthy food. Also, remember that you are not her best friend, you are her mother and take the time to teach her to sit still, pay attention etc.

Katie - posted on 12/04/2009

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Definately time for a new doctor or at least another doctor opinion. I have 2 children with ADHD and both of them weren't tested until the age of 4-5. I had seen signs of them having it at the age of 2-3. Your child could possibly be hitting the "terrible twos" early, and I don't mean that in a bad way, but the activity itself.

Kristina - posted on 12/04/2009

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As a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, I have NEVER heard of a 14 month being tested for ADHD--don't even know where to start. What is happening in her environment, what is she eating or not, and what is happening that you consider to be very very active? What are her sleep habits like? And has she had any other health problems such as ear infections or asthma? These are all differential questions that need to be addressed by your pediatric provider. Who wants, by the way, to test her for ADHD?

Nykee - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Lynn:

Just a note. kids that have been diagnose with ADHD, I've challenged the parents by letting me have them after they are off their so call controled drugs. I have a farm with horses. Every kid that spent a day with me went home and slept 8 hours and woke up calm, refreshed, and down to earth so to speak. Kids are just that Kids. They are active in many aspects of their lives. That is what helps the individual to grow into the person they become. Some are more active than others but, then their bodies need more activities to keep up with their body growth. My son was the same way and i told the Doc. no. We just gave him more to do and allowed more activities. Go to the park and let her swing. Let her run around the park a couple of times. Drugs control the individual, why stunt that energetic mind let her potentials flurish. My son was doing first year college work in eight grade. What if I listened to my Doctor and put him on that drug where would he be today. blondie


Thank you for having the courage to stay that medications are not always the answer, even though many would jump down your throat for saying so. I agree that in many cases diagnosing a child with ADD or ADHD is simply because teachers and parents don't want to do what it takes to wear that child out. I went to school for Child Development and Child Care Management, and worked for four years in a day care center, and I find that channeling their energy is just as effective (and safer) than medication!

Nykee - posted on 12/04/2009

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Yeah, when I worked in restaurants people would always opt for "caffiene free" soda for their kids, but really it's the sugar that's the culprit! Red dye will make a big difference. You'd be amazed at what has red dye in it. You can find out what makes your kid tick, but diet can DEFINITELY change a kid's level of activity (or hyperactivity). When my brother was little (this was before ADHD was a big deal), the doctor told my mom to give him a little bit of coffee with milk filling the rest of the cup in the mornings. That was his "Ritalin."

Sherri - posted on 12/04/2009

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Thank you Nykee for that info. I noticed that my grandson loves the iced latte or the frapachino and seems after a few sips to calm way down. We have to limit his sweets also. Haven't tried the red dye stuff yet. We don't let him have chocolate either right now b/c it seems to make him worse.

Nykee - posted on 12/04/2009

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Oh my! I agree completely with you, that's entirely too young! I'd definitely consider a second opinion. You may be able to calm her down with diet... small amounts of caffeine can help calm a child down, since it has an opposite effect before pubery than it does afterward. Perhaps cut out red dyes, as that adds to hyperactivity... and of course, avoid sugary foods. Otherwise, I think having a hyper child isn't a bad thing. It makes your job hard, but really - has anyone considered the possibility that medicating active children to become couch potatoes is part of the obesity problem our country seems to have? I think you're absolutely right to question a doctor who wants to medicate a 14 month old baby with those medications. Good luck!

Sherri - posted on 12/04/2009

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Medication at that age is a definate no no. My daughter was ADHD and we did not medicate her. We probably should have when she was a teenager, b/c she was completely out of control, began cutting herself and dressing gothic and really angry all of the time. She has grown out of it thankfully. Her son is 16 months old now and she and the daddy are both ADHD. We mentioned it to his doctor and they did not seem concerned at this point. Wait...Yes they are a handful and require a different kind of learning than some other kids, but so worth it. I am glad that I did not drug my daughter. Just takes alot of patience. Good luck.

Linda - posted on 12/04/2009

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BOY I WISH THEY HAD TO HAVE TESTED MY SON AT THAT AGE! I spent 13 years telling doctors my son had a problem and they blew me off! Had he been tested at 14 months like I asked we would have been spared 13 years of misery and confusion on all involved! Trust me you might think she is too young but if it is caught now she will be a happier child and learning will come far easier...Just don't let them put her on Ridelin that only makes things worse...Ask for alternatives and research those before you start her on the meds...My son had a night and day difference with Aderall...Now he is on Vyvance...There are safe alternatives out there...Do your research!

April - posted on 12/04/2009

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I was told my son had ADHD when he wasn't quite a year.Turns out ,he does,but instead of getting the coping mechinisms that can help ,I wouldn't get him tested

and put all of us(we have 2 other children) through hell. I finally conceded the point when I met Dr.Kathryn Cooke,my boy's pediatrition.We chose to not medicate him.We love his spirit and his energy.It has just taken a lot of creativity to find appropriate direction

for his energy. They are never too young to be diagnosed with something that auto-

matically makes them multi-taskers and the most likely to smell something 'strange'.

A great book to read and use with BIBLE enthusiasm is "Raising Your Spirited Child"

by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka.I promise it will help you. Good luck! God Bless!

Petra - posted on 12/04/2009

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If you think she may have ADHD and you are happy with the testing then go ahead but if you do not agree, if you think this is absolutely unnecessary and far too young for such a label then stick to your guns and say no to the testing. Remember YOU are the expert with your child NOT the doctor & don't ever let them make you feel different!

Jamie - posted on 12/04/2009

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I am a retired educator of 32 yrs., and we were told that most ADHD didn't manifest until about the third grade. I believe I would seek a second opinion.

Jamie - posted on 12/04/2009

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I am a retired educator of 32 yrs., and we were told that most ADHD didn't manifest until about the third grade. I believe I would seek a second opinion.

Velvet Dean - posted on 12/04/2009

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Oh and you might want to put a lot of thought into whether or not you will be willing to medicate her with drugs if she is ADHD before you have her tested. If she is diagnosed with it rather you want to medicate her or not the school will force it on you when she starts school. You may decide you want to try something else first before she is labeled as ADHD.

Velvet Dean - posted on 12/04/2009

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Is there any harm in allowing her to be her active self as long as she is not in school and it is not effecting her school work? Look into the doctor and find out if he has any connection to the pharmaceutical companies that put out the ADD and ADHD drugs. If you are having a problem controlling her yourself and you need something for her that will help YOU. Try lowering the amount of gluten and casein in her diet. I put my twins on a GFCF diet and it worked wonders for my boys. I am not suggesting by any means that you totally remove the gluten and the casein from her diet. Just lower it. Try more vegetarian dishes also. Especially at her age. Soups and Salads and such. Also use at wal-mart there is a great herbal tea. Celestial Seasonings. Do not give her to much. But they different kinds of herbal teas that have different effects. I used to give my children a small cup of the sleepy time tea about 1/2 hour before bedtime. Another thing you can do it a small amount of coffee. I know it sounds nuts but it really does work. I give my 5 yr old a very small amount of coffee (caramel drizzle folgers gormet for the taste) and it calms him down but doesn't turn him into any kind of a zombie. FYI If it makes her even more hyper she is NOT ADD or ADHD. Caffeine is a well known natural med for ADD and ADHD.



Anyway I hope I have helped. Good luck to you if you need any more assistance or advice please feel free to msg me.

Kerisue - posted on 12/04/2009

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Some kids are just active. From my exsperiance its what they eat.My son was very active and hard too. He got harder the older he got. I was judge that it was my parenting and I couldnt handle my child. This went on for four years. This is a very long story so I'll make it short and just tell you the results. It ended up my son has so many allergies that his nerves system shut down and didnt know how to handle life its self. I got his allergies under control and he is doing well. Red dyes and blue dyes are the most common allergy that makes kids have the ADHD behavor. He never got any rashes or hives I had no clue. It was just his behavor that was out of control. My advise is get allergy test done befor any meds. Good luck!! Your not alone. I felt so alone with it for a long time. There are a tons of mothers with very active kids.

Alicia - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Pam:

My son & I both have ADHD and it IS something that you're born with, though there's no definitive test like for diabetes or strep throat. Be aware that ADHD presents very diffrerently in girls than in boys. Do get info on what to look for and if you see the signs, learn how to help her channel the energy, feel less easily overwhelmed, or learn to gauge time more accurately, for example. ADHD people can be especially intelligent and creative,so encourage her to enjoy her talents!

Meds should always be a last resort and not prescribed for someone so young unless there are very serious problems (no jumping off the roof or running in traffic yet?) Children & Adults with ADD/ADHD (www.chadd.org) is fabulous and reliable: learn online, at meetings,talk to other parents, kids, specialists and ADHD coaches, get the latest research findings and borrow books for free.

But frankly, if you're not to the point of screaming and tearing your hair out, she probably doesn't have it!


 

Alison - posted on 12/04/2009

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Funny, cause I thought my daughter had ADHD at that age (and even before) and I wanted to get professional input (not medication), but they wouldn't even consider discussing it until the child is school-age or els serioiusly troubled. Unless she is a danger to herself or others, why would you medicate a child that young? And if you are not going to medicate, why test her???

[deleted account]

Seems young to me, but I knew right off the bat about my son that he was and no-one would test him. Finally, I had to go outside of his regular pediatrician to a specialist when he was 10 and sure enough, the results showed there was no doubt. At 14 months old, there is nothing they're going to do about it anyway, not at least until school starts, so you could go either way, just to find out. I would think you would have to retest again around the time she starts kindergarten. Is there a possibility that there is something else going on? I agree with Kris Harper's response - who cares until they get into school.

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