feeding?

Angel - posted on 12/16/2008 ( 42 moms have responded )

67

5

8

My son never seems full, he drinks 4-6 oz every feeding and feeds about every hour and a half. His doctor says he shouldn't be eating more than 4 oz, but he will scream and scream if he is still hungry (even after he's had 4 oz). She also said that I'm not suppose to feed him anything other than formula until he is 6 months old. Everything else I've seen says you should base it off your child's development. I don't know what to do about this????

42 Comments

View replies by

Jenette - posted on 12/17/2008

42

24

1

When I have problems or questions about my child, I try to think of it in the most simplistic way. Which one is worse??? Crying an hour and a half until the next feeding, or feeding another two ounces of formula. You might find out that your son could wait longer in between feedings if he got more ounces at a time. Which, could possibly let him drink fewer ounces overall in a day. For example, if he can drink six ounces every three hours instead of 4 ounces every hour and a half...by the end of the day, he will be drinking less formula if he drinks 6 ounces.

Let's break it down...If you feed your son every three hours for a 24 hour period, and you give him 6 ounces at each feeding, then you will be giving him a total number of 48 ounces in a day. Now if you feed him every hour and a half over a 24 hour period and give him 4 ounces at each feeding, he will eat a total of 64 ounces in a day.

Plus, a side note, he might only need six ounces for the morning feeding when he is most hungry and be satisfied with four ounces for the rest of the day.

I hope this is logical and makes sense. Let me know if it doesn't. And, if you have any questions, feel free to write.

Deborah - posted on 12/17/2008

1

7

0

Hi, I tried to skim through all the replies you have gotten thus far so I would not be repeating what someone else might have already said but I did not see anyone metion this so I will go ahead. I have a daughte with cystic fibrosis. Infants may or may not be tested for this in the states they are born in ( all states test for different numbers of genetic diseases based on their budget). In CF one of the issues is trouble in absorbing calories from the food eaten. So they have trouble gaining weight and tend to hungry more often. Babies will often present to thier pediatricians with such diagnosis like-failure to thrive...a simple sweat test done at a licensed CF center can rule out CF. I am in no way trying to be an alarmist but as a parent of a child with CF...I always like to tell mothers who say their babies are "still hungry"..there are always other avenues to be aware of.

Kerry - posted on 12/17/2008

8

10

1

My son was super hungry too. Feed him as much formula as he wants. He will stop when he is full or throw it up. Then he will get more a time (mine was taking like 7oz sometimes) and last longer. My baby boy had crazy growth spurts and thats why it seemed that way. I just fed him what he wanted and at about 5 months he evened out.

Kerry

Jennifer - posted on 12/17/2008

15

11

1

hi i'm a mother to four kids, every stage of anything, with them have all been different. so, from as soon as 3 months to the latest one starting at 5 months. your his mom you know him, trust your instincts. if he is hungry give him more to drink and if that still doesn't fill him, a little bit of rice cereal is a good start.when he is full he will tell you just dont feed him anymore if he is pushing you away or turning his head away.if he does that and he is still acting the way you beleave is out of hunger it might be more of a comfort thing. my oldest (breastfeed) started wanting more just an hour after finishing. so we started giving him a pacifier and that seemed to help.

good luck to you both.

Kellee - posted on 12/17/2008

3

6

0

My son would take 12 oz at a feeding and would be hungry every half hour from 8 till midnight at 4 weeks. At 6 weeks I started putting rice cereal in about 1-2 oz of breastmilk and fed it to him in an infant feeder (kind of like a syringe and a bottle). I made it so thin that you could hardly tell it had any cereal in it. He started going to bed and sleeping through the night. You need to watch him the first couple times he eats it to make sure he is not having any trouble digesting it like you would when adding any new foods and make sure you burp him so he doesn't spit it up (if you use the infant feeder he will suck it down real fast so don't put more than 1-2 oz in it at first). My doctor frowned upon it so I only fed him this way before bedtime and either nursed or bottlefed all the other feedings. I started him on regular cereal when my doctor gave it the OK at 2-3 months. My son never had any food allergies and is not overweight in anyway- he still eats like a horse at 6 and I can't keep any weight on him. My daughter was perfectly content with just breastmilk until I started her on cereal when the doctor gave me the OK. After I started her on rice cereal it gave her gas and she woke up hungry every 2 hours all night (she was sleeping 6-8 hours through the night) so I had to skip rice cereal and go to oatmeal. I think each child is different and you have to follow their cues. I think that some kids- especially boys need a little something extra sometimes. Both my children have healthy appetites and good eating habits and are not anywear near overweight- they both started differently though. Good Luck!

Shannon - posted on 12/17/2008

10

14

0

since my baby was 3mnths she was drrinking atleast 6oz every 2hrs

i think your baby knows better then your doctor if hes hungry

Jennifer - posted on 12/17/2008

4

20

0

Hi! I nursed my baby (and still nurse her). At that age she was still nursing every hour and a half for 30 minutes at a time. When I went back to work I would pump at work and bring home between 5-6 oz for her to have the next day while i was at work. It seemed like when i got home all she wanted to do is nurse b/c she was so hungry. We were going to wait until she was 6 mos old to introduce solid food, but at 4 mos she was staring at our food and trying to grab it. When she turned 5 mos we started stage 1 vegetables like squash and carrots. She loved them. I didn't want to give her any grains, so we skipped the rice cereal. We were trying to be cautious about food introduction b/c I have food allergies and I didn't want to trigger any for her. I think you should base your decision on common sense and they way your son is developing. Also, my baby was fairly fussy the first few months of life. I wasn't sure what was wrong with her, but it turned out to be gas. We gave her gas drops every time she nursed or ate and it solved her fussiness and crying issues. A great website for alternative information is www.mothering.com. We also started teaching her sign language when she was four mos old. When she was 6 mos old she was able to tell me whether she wanted water (drink), milk, or food (eat), and if she was tired (sleep). www.aslpro.com is a great sign language web site.

Fiona - posted on 12/17/2008

2

0

0

Wow...we all have TONNES of ideas/opinions, eh? This is so brilliant. Having read all these posts, I think the overwhelming tone of them all is that you trust yourself to know what your little guy needs. Babies don't REALLY come with a manual, so it's very much trial and error in parenting...taking your cues from him will help. And, you will develop a very good, and a very strong sense of being a good Mum/Mom.

Blaine - posted on 12/17/2008

13

5

0

If your baby is still hungry you should offer him more. At that age they only eat out of neccessity unlike us! I read something recently that said offer their weight divided by two in ounces. So if the baby weighs 14 lbs offer 7 ounces. Your baby will either eat it or not.

Dannell - posted on 12/16/2008

1

12

0

sometimes your child seems hungry when it is just wind, a bit of a tummy ache they thing they are hungry because they are unable to tell the difference between one ache and another. sometime feeding more on top of this creats more pain and an unhappy mum as baby screams alot!

Krystal - posted on 12/16/2008

15

29

3

no way bryce has been eating 8 oz. since he was about 3 monthes and that was every 4 hours. and as far as his not having anything else until he s 6 monthes you ll know when he s ready even if you try the cereal and he regects it at least you tries sorry i don t have more to offer.

Alison - posted on 12/16/2008

25

1

5

Do not feel guilty if you have to feed your son more than 4 ounces at a time...some babies need that extra ounce or two. I also feed my baby formula right before bed and it helps her stay asleep.

Jen - posted on 12/16/2008

1

0

0

The research done by the World Health Org. says that "solid" food isn't necessary for the first 6 months of life. Mother's breastmilk is the best choice for baby, followed by doner breastmilk. Developmental cues are important for introducing solid foods as there are children that seem to be ready before 6 months. I've also known children that didn't take solids until 8 months. The child should be watching you eat, trying to grap your food and be able to swallow the food. If you put a small amount of food in their mouth and their tongue reflects spits it back out that means they aren't ready. This is a protective reflex so they don't choke.

Jennifer - posted on 12/16/2008

2

0

0

It's hard to do when a DOCTOR tells you otherwise, but you should trust yourself as a mom and decide for your baby what is best.



Good luck with getting some relief from crying baby!

[deleted account]

Angel:

I'm not sure how old you baby is, but I have heard that if you start solids too early, there is a greater risk in developing food allergies - not sure it's true, but thought it should be mentioned. I had the same feeding problem w/ my 2nd daughter - it turned out it wasn't the food amount but the time period. From the time she was born until about 6 months, I would give my daughter the bottle, she would take about 1 hour to drink it (the amounts increase as she grew from 2 to 4 to 6, etc...) and 30 min later she was screaming for more food. When I asked my pediatrician he told me to watch for what she was doing while feeding. Turned out she would take little naps between "drinks", or would chew on the bottle nipple instead of just drinking the formula. Like instead of having a bowl of pasta in one sitting you take a bite here or there for a couple of hours- you may not feel satisfied. When she started with solids it got easier because it takes longer for it to be digested and holds them for longer.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Pamela - posted on 12/16/2008

7

6

0

I am on my third child and with each and everyone, I started feeding my children cereal bottles by two months. My kids were Hungry like yours and I couldn't deny them food. First, started them on a four ounce bottle of two scoops of powder formula, with one spoon of fruit ( either bananas or applesauce) and about 1-2 tablespoons of oatmeal.. FYI always start with Oatmeal cereal because it is gentle with their stomachs, never rice cereal at first, it WILL bind them. You will need to use a tri-cut nipple or use a Slow nipple and take a sterilized needle to make it a (little) more open for the formula, rice and fruit to make it through the opening. It will give you a peace of mind and a night of sleep! But, be careful. You will have to burp them very well before bed time and...keep their head a little raised just incase...I use a pillow in their crib and my 3 month old sleeps from 7:30p.m. -2:00a.m.! Then wants a bottle @ 5:30 a.m. He is also eating from a spoon of stage one fruits and veges just at 10:00 am ( just once a day) and then a cereal at night. Good Luck sweetie....hope it works for you! P.D of NY.

Alice - posted on 12/16/2008

14

21

1

Hi Angel, I had the same problem with my #2 son who is now 31yrs. and has children of his own. I'm telling you this to let you know that do survive and he has never been over weight either. As a baby and toddler he ate everything in site and seemed to never be satisfied. I had to decide when not to feed him. Like you, at first I didn't know what to do, I was breast feeding him and giving him formula. I didn't like the smell of the formula so I stopped giving it to him. I continued to breast feed and began giving him cereal and eventually table foods early. We have to treat each baby individually because they each have have their own unique make up. Listen to your child, feed him nutritious meals, learn when not to feed him (to prevent over feeding) and LOVE him!

Julie - posted on 12/16/2008

35

8

4

My son did the same thing. I was feeding him every hour on the hour. I knew I was producing enough. I was totally exhausted after two months. I started him on rice cereal mixed with breast milk. It was so funny because he knew exactly what to do with a spoon and never rejected it. I gave him cereal at night before bedtime. Finally he would sleep 3 -4 hours.

Andrea - posted on 12/16/2008

6

13

0

I just posted a similar question to you. I have just put my son onto 6 oz of formula and he seems to be very hungry with that amount! My Dr. at his 2 month check up told me to feed him until he is full! That you should not "control" the amount you feed him. I feed my son Enfamil formula and when you go onto their webiste they give you guidelines...they say a 3-6 month old should be drinking around 5-6oz. They say to take your childs birth weight and multiply it by 2.5 and that is the total daily amount your child should be getting (but to keep in mind every child develops differently). My question is when can I start rice cereal...I think that might help to fill my son?

Jill - posted on 12/16/2008

9

14

0

I'm with everyone else.. If you baby is hungry feed them. Make sure that they burp after the feedings because if they don't they could get a stomache. My son is just about 6 weeks old, he is breastfeed but at night we give him a bottle befor going to bed he is already eating 6 oz. He also weights 10lbs 7.5 oz and is 21 inches long. So he is a big baby and needs more to fill himself up.. But sometimes when he is fussing he just needs to be burped then he feels better. I wouldn't worry about the 4 oz thing soons fishy to me. This doctor is not with your baby everyday to know what you are going through.

[deleted account]

My son is an eater too :) He's 5 months old and I started feeding him rice cereal at 4 months and stage 1 foods at 4 1/2 months. I still breastfeed him but it just wasn't enough because he would still be hungry after eating. Right now, I give him solid food meals twice a day and breastfeed him the rest of the time. Our pediatrician said to feed him if he's hungry and ok'd solid foods at 4 months.

Keri - posted on 12/16/2008

10

20

0

my daughter was the same way and the doctor told me the exact same thing too but i fed her stage one rice cereal anyway, i made extra runny and just her a little bit once a day. i started this with her when she was 4 months and it made it a whole lot better especially at night time i did not have to get up near as often with her. i also think that it got her ready for solid foods a an early stage and than when it came time to eat the solid foods to had no problems.

User - posted on 12/16/2008

12

0

0

I have 2 children, my son is 12, he and I couldn't get the breastfeeding thing right, so he was formula fed from about 2 months on. My daughter is 8 now and she breastfed up to 13 months. I wouldn't start a baby on "solids" until 5 or 6 months, but I think the "only x number of oz. per feeding is ridiculous. If you were breastfeeding, she would have no idea how much you were feeding your child. When I was in the maternity ward after my son was born, I remember a young mother actually using the call button to ASK if she could feed her crying newborn. Babies have no ulterior motives, no self esteem issues or body image issues. If your baby is hungry, feed him. If hunger is not the issue, he will stop eating. I would look for a second opinion from another pediatrician. If the doctor doesn't seem to be looking at your child as an individual now, how will you trust her skill if there is a medical emergency?
Good luck and lots of joy with your little one.

Fiona - posted on 12/16/2008

2

0

0

These are all good responses, to a very important question. It's hard to know, especially when you're a first time parent, when enough is enough and when more is more...one of the BEST things we can all do is trust our instincts as mothers (we have these instincts for very important reasons). Doctor's advice is just that: advice. A good doctor will tell you that they are human first, doctor's second and what they know is because of what they've learned/experienced. Same things with us Mum's/Mom's. Your journey with your little guy might only be a few months old, but he's communicating quite effectively with you...and you're listening. So go with that. You KNOW he's hungry. You aren't posting on here that he has tummy ache or crying about a wet nappy or something...you KNOW he's hungry.

So...what to do about your hungry baby? It's pretty difficult to overfeed a baby. They are VERY good at telling you when they don't want anymore or don't want something (and believe me, it doesn't change as they get older...the vocabulary and means of expressing those things just shifts.) So, it might be worth trying an extra ounce or two to see how he does with it...he'll spit the bottle out if he's full or had enough. A good doctor will tell you to see what works for your little guy, not go by some numbers in a book or ratio. Your little guy isn't a number or ratio...he's a hungry little man. ;0)

Just for reference...I had two girls. Both born at 7.5 lbs and about 20 cms. One breastfed for about 4 months and then just wouldn't anymore. She was interested in foods from about 3 months on...and like yours was holding her head up, rolling and all of that important development stuff really early on. So she became a formula and food-fed baby. She developed quite well, aside from a dairy allergy (which resulted in her being a soy-formula fed baby). The other breastfed for 3 years and was barely ever interested in real food. This little one, I swear, would eat, and eat, and eat. There were days when I did NOTHING all day except feed that baby, change her, clean her and feed her some more. She didn't spit up and she grew at a rate that was appropriate for her. She's a petite thing, still is, one of the smallest kids in her class and at the age of 7 and half, still only weighs 42 lbs. She's totally healthy though (we've had her checked.) She breastfed like a fiend. She didn't start on solids until she was almost a year because she just wasn't interested (we offered...many and various things). I wondered about the 'safety' of breastfeeding almost exclusively for that length of time, but it's all she wanted. She eventually nibbled on fruits, etc. but I seriously thought she was sucking the life out of me and my breasts because she ate soooooooooooooooo much. IF she had been formula fed, I'm not sure we could've afforded to feed her. lol. There's no way she was having 2-4 oz at the same stage as your son. I pumped too, and she would take a 6-8 oz bottle in one sitting. As there are 62 million genetic codings that create the individual that you know as your son, so too, there are likely as many 'right' or 'wrong' ways to feed your baby...your little man KNOWs what he needs, and he's telling you. It's ok to trust yourself. You're not going to hurt him by trying him on an extra ounce or two...he'll tell you he's had enough.

Not all solids are built equal either. I know the requisite advice is to start your babies on 'cereals' and such. Please remember that Pablum/cereals weren't invented until around the Great Depression as a way to satiate starving orphans/hospital babies. Just because they are 'easy' doesn't mean they are easily tolerated or necessarily very good for babies. There are, of course, various schools of thought on this subject. I ground up organic rice and sometimes oatmeal in my coffee grinder and started from there...costs less and no fillers AND I knew what was going into it. Usually though, we mulched/mushed up carrots, peas, potatoes, squash, cooked pear & apple to get us started. Mashed potatoes and gravy were a staple 'baby' food in our house for a long time. I'm not saying that all people would agree with this, but it worked for us. Never bound up or caused distress to our children.

Our youngest, not interested in food, baby very quickly decided that rice & soft tofu were her staples. When she was about 1.5 years we added brocolli, spinach, etc. (not advisable for wee people though). She picked, and breastfed. And she's just fine. Still loves rice, tofu and seaweed.

There's piles of info out there on WHAT TO DO...at this point, though, you have a hungry baby. We know he's hungry because YOU KNOW he's hungry, so go with that instinct...the ounces and measurements are just guidelines...otherwise your doctor would have a hard time giving you approximates of what to feed your baby. So, take his advice as guidelines...doesn't mean you HAVE to follow it to the letter.

Listen to your little guy, he's telling you what he needs already...

[deleted account]

I would be really careful about introducing solids too soon. Especially if food allergies run in your family. The other reason is, I've read, their tummy's aren't designed to be able to handle solids till at least 5-6 months. They have to be able to hold their head up, move food with their tongues to the back of their mouth, and have the enzymes in tact to digest the food. All those things don't come together till they are closer to 5-6 months. If you don't trust your child's doctor, you need to find a new doctor. I know my kids' pediatrician is constantly keeping abreast on the most recent clinical studies and is well informed. She wants what's best for my children. She also gives me lists of resources she trusts for me to check into myself, because there is so much conflicting info out there. What ever you do, it was always recommended to me to find someone you trust and some source you trust and cling to it tightly.
Is this baby #1? Sometimes there's a learning curve with our babies too, learning their cues and what they mean. Even with my third baby, I have trouble reading her cues because tired and hungry are so similar. She sucks her fists for both...so what I do is try giving her a pacifier and bundling her (see Happiest Child on the Block for details) to see if she is just over stimulated then laying her down. If she repeatedly spits it out, I know she's hungry so I offer her more milk. I also have been giving her more floor time when she's done eating so she can exercise her muscles, etc. then lay her down (same way) after about 20 minutes on the floor. She is breastfeeding though so it's totally on-demand. When they wean to formula though I always read you're supposed to give them a bottle every 3-4 hours because it takes a little longer for it to digest.
Does any of that help?
Good luck.

Mindy - posted on 12/16/2008

3

8

0

The book is on Growingkids.org It is a christan based book and like all books you have to do what is right for you and your situation. Just like taking doctors advice trying cereal will not hurt your child, he will let you know if it well satisfy him or if he hates it.

Mindy - posted on 12/16/2008

3

8

0

There is a great book available called "baby wise" I have given to many new mothers who loved the book. It also gives advice on feeding, teaching sign language before they can talk and helping your little one sleep through the night. We did this with our last child and it was amazing the diffence it made.

[deleted account]

My daughter was just like your son. I fed her until she was full. Babies are smart. They will tell you when they are hungry and turn their head when they are full. At least that is how my Dr. explained things and that is how my daughter responded. I didn't start rice cereal until she was 6 months. Good luck.

[deleted account]

Another great book is by Dr. Spock (no, I'm not talking about Star Trek) about child development. He has a very sensitive and emotional perspective on raising children from birth to the teenaged years. It's a good how-to manual!

Brooke - posted on 12/16/2008

6

22

0

Just because a kid is hungry doesn't mean he is ready for solids. Everything a baby needs for at least 6 months comes from the breast/bottle.

Every baby is different, if your baby is telling you he is hungry, feed him!

I have had several experiences with doctors that show me that they don't know everything. The best thing you have is your own sense of what your baby is asking you for.

There is an amazing book that will shed light on feeding your child...I learned an enormous amount and it really helps even through the toddler and child years.

It is called Child of Mine: Feeding with Love and Good Sense by Ellyn Satter. It came highly recommended from several sources, but you should check it out and decide for yourself!

Kristi - posted on 12/16/2008

42

10

4

My son started solids about 5 months. He was breastfed and he ate whenever he was hungry. I think the fact that your baby shows interest in food, is still hungry after formula and sounds like ahead developmentally, probably means he's ready for the next step. I would def. consider another doctor. You should never let your baby be hungry; that's horrible advice. I think you should trust your instinct. If it makes you uncomfortable, it's probably for a reason, and if it feels right, it probably is. That's hows its been in my experience anyway. Good Luck!

[deleted account]

I have two little treasures, and they were both great eaters! My daughter (now six months) was consuming 8oz of formula every two hours (YES... that much every two hours). Our wonderful doctor told us to feed her as much as she desired. Some babies need more, some less. With her consent, we started her on solids at 2.5 months (and my son at 3 months). Both of them are developping beautifully. If you opt to give him solids, make sure to 'stick' to one food for a few days in order to eliminate any allergic concerns. I would give my baby as much formula as she desired...remember that they also go through some growth spurts and need different amounts at different stages. Best of luck to you.

Monica - posted on 12/16/2008

0

0

4

I'd try it then. Just a little bit of cereal and see if he takes it. Try a tablespoon of cereal mixed with formula or breast milk and spoon feed him. It really can't hurt him. Our parents fed us cereal before we were 2 months old...and we're still healthy as can be. Then you can tell your doctor what you did and let them know your babie's response. Some babies are ready earlier than others. You shouldn't have to starve your baby because the doctor doesn't want you to feed him more than 4 oz. Mom's know best. Go with your instinct.

Melissa - posted on 12/16/2008

6

4

2

Delete

Are you sure? Yes | No Posted by You (a moment ago)



I personally have a problem with doctors. When I had my daughter the nurse told me not to give my daughter the full two ounce bottle, and that if she was eating that much she would have to stay longer in the hospital. I asked my OB/GYN and he said that if she was hungry, feed her. He said he'd never heard of letting a child be hungry and that no, the hospital won't keep the baby longer because she's eating the two ounces. My children are big kids. Not fat, but just big and tall. My daughter is 4 yr old and is 42 inches tall and 48 pounds. She is above all other children in her height/weight chart, and always has been. She eats healthy foods and very very rarely has junk food/candy. For a snack she always has a green apple and that's all she wants. I know my kids. My doctor knows statistics and "should be's" just like he told me once that my daughter's head was 'too big'. The dietician at WIC said she was too tall. I asked the diestician if she wanted me to step on my daughter, shrink her a little. My point is that the doctor isn't there 24/7 and that fact should be taken into consideration when getting advice from your doctor. I do agree with simply giving your son more in his bottles if he wants it, if you don't want to start on jar food (jar food is NOT solid by any sense of the imagination). But just remember that your the MOM not your doctor, and not any of us.

Angel - posted on 12/16/2008

67

5

8

He watches everyone around him eat with great interest. I'm not sure if it is a growth spurt because he's been doing this for a while, almost a month now.

Margot - posted on 12/16/2008

2

3

0

I agree with some of the other posts. You should probably talk to another doctor, or tell your pediatrician, "here's the thing. He's hungry. I want to feed him more formula, but you are telling me that isn't a good idea. So, now I'm considering starting him on solid foods because my son is hungry!"



Because I'll guess that if she doesn't want you to feed him 6 ounces, she isn't going to want you to start him on solids either.

Monica - posted on 12/16/2008

0

0

4

My son is 5 months old and just started to have an interest in eating food. We started feeding him yesterday one meal with a bottle. I was told by our doctor that it's up to us when we want to start and what we want him to start eating. He said between 4 months and one year we are the ones that determine when he transitions from cereal to vegetables to fruit. If your little one shows an interest in what you are eating, then yes I'd dry cereal. Make it very liquid-like so they can get used to the texture. If your little one isn't showing any interest then they are not ready. He could be going through a growth spurt. Be patient :) Babies grow up so fast!!!

Angel - posted on 12/16/2008

67

5

8

See his pediatrician told me that 6 oz is way too much for a baby his age to be drinking, and not to feed him more than 4 oz. Half the time this leaves him still extremely hungry and really fussy. I just don't know what to do, because he is already sitting pretty much on his own and can hold his head up without any problems. He has been rolling since he was about 2 and a half weeks old.

Margot - posted on 12/16/2008

2

3

0

I agree with your doctor on the no solid food until 6 months old. We didn't feed our son solids until he was 6 months old, partially because that's what our pediatrician told us to do, and partially because we didn't want to rush it. By the time he was eating solids, though, he was consuming an 8 oz bottle every 4 hours, and it seemed to be the next logical step.



As for feeding him only 4 oz at a time. That should be based on his development. Our pediatrician told us to just feed our son until he was satiated, but not to let him snack in between. If you were breastfeeding him, he would drink as much as he wanted, and the more he wanted, the more your body would produce. Our pediatrician was fairly emphatic about making sure that he got his fill at mealtimes so that he would not want to snack and create bad habits.



When my son was still an infant, the most commonly heard words through our house were "honey, can we get another 2 ounces please?". Because as he grew he would just suck through what we thought he would eat. Through all of that, his growth and development have been right on track.



I hope this helps and that you get some helpful answers from other moms as well.

Angel - posted on 12/16/2008

67

5

8

My son is 3 months old, I formula feed him and he really doesn't spit up much at all

Laurie - posted on 12/16/2008

28

12

3

I'd try a different doctor and see if they both say the same thing. I'm not sure how old your child is, so I'm not sure about the feeding thing. I know I've been told with all six of mine that food is typically introduced between four and six months, depending on their interest and development. My twin infants are not four months yet but the pediatrician is having me feed them some rice cereal now to try and get some more weight on them. So, I think I'd start by seeing another doctor. Or at the very least talk to the one you have now and make sure they know how hungry he is... and then ask "why?" to anything they tell you. (I think that's just a good rule of thumb anyway with any doctor) Also, does your son spit up a lot? I think that makes them hungrier sooner, especially if you're breastfeeding and they're spitting up all the hind milk. Just a thought.

Melissa - posted on 12/16/2008

6

4

2

How old is your son? My daughter started eating stage 1 jar food at 3 months; my son started at about 4 months. I would give it to them once, maybe twice a day. Sometimes I had to put rice cereal in it if it was really runny, like carrots, so it doesn't just drip down their throats.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms